Pressure Cooker Bone Broth or Stock

3 pounds bones, preferably a mix of meaty bones and marrow-filled bones
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 ½ tablespoons coarse sea salt, or to taste
1 to 2 celery stalks
1 large carrot
1 large onion, 2 leeks, or a bunch of leek greens
1 whole clove or star anise pod
2 to 6 garlic cloves
5 to 7 sprigs fresh thyme or dill
5 to 7 sprigs fresh parsley
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
2 to 4 1-inch-thick coins peeled fresh ginger (optional)

If you want to roast the bones first, heat the oven to 450ºF. Lay the bones out on a rimmed baking sheet and roast until well browned, 25 to 35 minutes.

Put the bones (roasted or not) in the pressure cooker pot and add all the remaining ingredients. Cover with 3 to 3 1/2 quarts of water (the water shouldn’t come more than two-thirds of the way up the side of the pot).

To make regular stock, cook on high pressure for 1 hour if using all chicken or poultry bones, or 2 hours for beef or pork bones or a combination of poultry and meat.

For bone broth, cook on high pressure for 3 hours for poultry bones, and 4 1/2 hours for beef, pork, or mixed bones. When making bone broth, you’ll know you’ve cooked it long enough if all the connective tissue, tendons, and cartilage have dissolved and the bones crumble a bit when you poke at them. If this hasn’t happened, cook it on high pressure for another 30 minutes and check it again.

Allow the pressure to release naturally. Use the broth or stock right away, or store it in the refrigerator or freezer. Bone broth and regular stock will keep for 5 days refrigerated or up to 6 months frozen.

Pressure Cooker Chicken Curry

3 to 4 ripe tomatoes, halved through their equators
3 tablespoons ghee, unsalted butter or safflower oil
3 tablespoons virgin coconut oil
2 cups finely chopped onions
6 garlic cloves, grated on a Microplane or minced
2 tablespoons grated peeled fresh ginger
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 3-inch cinnamon stick or 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
8 cardamom pods, lightly crushed with the flat side of a knife, or 1 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into 1-inch chunks
1 to 2 teaspoons garam masala, to taste
1/2 cup canned unsweetened coconut milk
Cooked basmati rice, for serving (optional)
Plain yogurt, for serving (optional)
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish

Set a box grater over a bowl. Starting with their cut sides, grate the tomatoes through the large holes of the box grater so the tomato pulp falls into the bowl. Discard the skins. Measure out 2 cups of tomato purée.

Using the sauté function, heat the ghee and the coconut oil in the pressure cooker. Stir in the onions and cook, stirring often to encourage even browning, until they are caramelized, 12 to 18 minutes. Stir in the garlic, ginger and cumin seeds; cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Stir in the cinnamon and cardamom and cook for another minute. Then stir in the coriander, salt, turmeric, red pepper flakes, black pepper and finally the tomato purée.

Add the chicken to the sauce, cover and cook on low pressure for 4 minutes. Let the pressure release naturally. If the sauce seems too thin, use a slotted spoon to transfer the chicken to a bowl and then simmer the sauce on the sauté setting until it has thickened to taste. (Note that the coconut milk will thin the sauce down further.) Stir in the garam masala and the coconut milk, and let the curry sit for 20 minutes for the flavors to meld. Serve with the rice and yogurt, if desired. Garnish with cilantro.

Pressure Cooker Chicken and Dumplings

3 1/2 pounds bone-in chicken pieces, preferably dark meat (if using white meat, cut cooking time by 2 minutes)
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more as needed
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
2 carrots, diced
2 celery stalks, diced
1 Spanish onion, diced
1 turnip, peeled and diced
4 garlic cloves, smashed
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 quart chicken stock, preferably homemade
Chopped fresh parsley or celery leaves, for serving

FOR THE DUMPLINGS
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup fine cornmeal
1/4 cup minced fresh chive (optional)
2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons butter, melted
3/4 cup whole milk

Pressure Cooker Cuban Pork

8 garlic cloves
Juice of 1 grapefruit (about 2/3 cup)
Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
1 tablespoon fresh oregano leaves
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 ½ tablespoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
1 4- to 5-pound boneless pork shoulder, cut into 4 pieces
1 bay leaf
Chopped fresh cilantro leaves, for serving
Lime wedges, for serving
Hot Sauce, for serving
Tortillas, for serving (optional)
Fresh tomato salsa, for serving (optional)

In a blender or mini food processor, combine the garlic, grapefruit juice, lime zest and juice, 2 tablespoons of the oil, brown sugar, oregano, cumin, and salt; process until blended. Transfer to a large bowl and add the pork and bay leaf; toss to combine. Marinate, covered, at room temperature for 1 hour (or refrigerate for up to 6 hours).

Using the sauté function set on high if available, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in the pressure cooker (or use a large skillet). Remove the pork from the marinade, reserving the marinade, and shake the meat to remove any excess liquid. Cook until it is browned on all sides, about 12 minutes (you will need to do this in batches, transferring the browned pork pieces to a plate as you go).

When all the pork is browned, return the pieces to the pot along with any juices from the plate. (If you used a skillet, add 1 tablespoon water and use a wooden spoon to scrape the skillet well to include all the browned bits stuck to the bottom.) Add the reserved marinade to the pot. Cover and cook on high pressure for 80 minutes. Let the pressure release naturally.

Remove the pork from the cooking liquid (jus). Taste the jus, and if it seems bland or too thin, boil it down either in the pressure cooker on the sauté setting or in a separate pot on the stove until it thickens slightly and intensifies in flavor, 7 to 15 minutes. Remove the bay leaf and add a bit of salt if necessary. If you’d like to degrease the jus, use a fat separator to do so, or just let the jus settle and spoon the fat off the top.

Shred the meat, using your hands or two forks. Toss the meat with the jus to taste (be generous—1 1/2 to 2 cups should do it), and serve with cilantro, lime wedges, and hot sauce.

Painkillers

For one, follow the 1-2-3-4 model:
1 part lime juice (sour)
2 parts cream of coconut (sweet)
3 parts Cruzan Rum (strong)
4 parts pineapple juice, perhaps diluted with some water (weak)

For a batch:
1 empty gallon jug
Either 2 cups Cruzan dark rum or 1 cup dark rum and 2 cups vanilla rum (for the Nilla Killa)
1 15oz can of Coco Lopez Cream of Coconut
32 oz of Orange Juice
32 oz of Pineapple Juice
32 oz of Mango Juice
fresh grated nutmeg

Put tge rum and Coco Lopez in first, then fill up the jug with the juices.

You can also leave the rum out and let people mix their own.

1-2-3-4 Punch

One of Sour
Two of Sweet
Three of Strong
Four of Weak

For example:

1 part lime juice
2 parts simple syrup or grenadine (or better yet, Campari)
3 parts rum
4 parts juice (orange, pineapple, etc.)
freshly grated nutmeg
a dash or two of bitters

A variation: Maho Bay Rum Punch

1 part lime juice (sour)
2 parts cream of coconut (sweet)
3 parts Cruzan Rum (strong)
4 parts pineapple juice, perhaps diluted with some water (weak)