Prime Rib Roast with Sage Jus

One 14-pound prime rib bone-in roast, tied
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
20 large sage sprigs
20 large thyme sprigs
8 bay leaves
8 shallots, peeled and halved
1 head garlic, cloves crushed, plus 4 cloves thinly sliced
2 cups water
1 onion, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons freshly cracked black peppercorns
1 cup dry red wine
5 cups beef stock or low-sodium broth
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Preheat the oven to 400°. Set the meat in a large roasting pan, fat side up. Season the meat generously with salt and pepper. Around the roast, scatter 10 sprigs each of sage and thyme, 6 of the bay leaves, the shallots and the crushed garlic cloves. Pour in 1 cup of the water and roast for 45 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 275°. Roast the meat for about 2 hours and 15 minutes longer, adding the remaining 1 cup of water to the pan as the juices evaporate. The roast is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 135°.

Transfer the roast to a large carving board. Pour the fat in the roasting pan into a large heatproof bowl, stopping when you reach the syrupy pan juices at the bottom. Pour the pan juices into a small bowl and discard the vegetables and herbs.

Set the pan over 2 burners and add 2 tablespoons of the reserved fat. Add the onion, peppercorns and the sliced garlic, remaining 2 bay leaves and 10 sprigs each of sage and thyme. Cook over moderate heat until the onion is softened, about 8 minutes. Add the wine and cook, scraping up any bits stuck to the bottom and sides of the pan. Pour the mixture into a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the beef stock and pan juices and cook over moderate heat until slightly reduced, about 15 minutes.

In a small bowl, whisk the flour with 2 tablespoons of the reserved fat. Whisk the paste into the saucepan and simmer the gravy until thickened, about 5 minutes. Strain the gravy through a fine sieve and keep warm until ready to serve.

Cut the bones off the roast and slice the meat 1/2 inch thick. Cut in between the bones and serve them on the side. Pass the gravy at the table.

Prime Rib Roast with Coffee Rub

1/3 cup finely ground coffee
2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped
One 12-pound, bone-in prime rib roast (5 bones)

In a bowl, thoroughly blend the coffee with the salt, pepper and vanilla bean seeds. Set the rib roast in a roasting pan and rub it all over with the coffee mixture, concentrating most of the rub on the fatty part of the meat. Turn the roast bone side down and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 450°. Roast the meat for 15 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 325° and roast for about 2 1/2 hours longer, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the meat registers 125° for medium-rare.

Transfer the roast to a carving board and let rest for 20 minutes. Scrape off any excess coffee rub. Carve the meat in 1/2-inch-thick slices and serve.

Make Ahead: The coffee-rubbed roast can be refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature before roasting.

Standing Pork Rib Roast with Cracklings

One 8-rib pork loin roast with skin (about 5 1/2 pounds)—ribs frenched, skin scored at 1/2-inch intervals and tied
1/2 cup kosher salt

Place the pork loin on a rimmed baking sheet. Season generously all over with 1/4 cup of the salt, then sprinkle the skin with the remaining 1/4 cup of salt to create a thin layer of salt over it; be sure to push the salt into the crevices in the skin at each score. Refrigerate uncovered overnight.

Let the pork stand at room temperature for 3 hours. ?Preheat the oven to 275°. Set ?a rack in a large roasting pan. Using a damp towel, brush the excess salt off the roast, then transfer to the pan skin side up. Bake for about 1 hour and ?30 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 115°.

Increase the heat to 450° and continue to roast for about 50 minutes longer, until the skin is crisp and an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 135°. Transfer the roast to a carving board and let rest for 30 minutes. Remove and discard the ties. Using a sharp serrated knife, slice the meat and serve.

Roast Beef with Chilies and Arugula

ROAST BEEF
One 4-pound dry-aged sirloin roast
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

HOT SAUCE
1/2 pound red fresno or red jalapeño chiles—stemmed, seeded and coarsely chopped
1 garlic clove, crushed
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
1/4 up water
2 tablespoons kosher salt

GARNISHES
1/2 cup whole milk
1/2 cup very thinly sliced garlic cloves (sliced on a mandoline)
Canola oil, for frying
Kosher salt
2 cups baby arugula
Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzle
2 scallions, thinly sliced
Freshly ground pepper

Set the roast on a baking sheet and rub it all over with the salt and pepper. Refrigerate, uncovered, for 1 day.

Preheat the oven to 400°. Heat a large cast-iron skillet. Cook the roast, fat side down, over moderately high heat until well browned, about 3 minutes. Continue cooking, turning, until the meat is browned all over, about 5 minutes. Turn the meat fat side up and roast for 40 to 45 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center registers 125° for medium rare. Transfer the roast to a cutting board and let rest for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the hot sauce. In a blender, combine all of the ingredients and puree until smooth. Strain into a medium bowl.

In a small saucepan, bring the milk and garlic just to a boil. Drain the garlic and pat the slices dry on paper towels. In a small saucepan, heat 1/2 inch of canola oil to 275°. Working in 2 batches, fry the garlic, stirring, until light golden, 1 to 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the garlic to paper towels to drain. Season with salt and let cool.

Spread the arugula on a platter. Thinly slice the roast and arrange on the arugula. Drizzle a little hot sauce and olive oil over the meat and garnish with the garlic chips and scallions. Season with salt and pepper and serve the remaining hot sauce at the table.

The hot sauce can be refrigerated for 1 week. The garlic chips can be stored for 1 day in an airtight container.

Stewed Black-Eyed Peas

2 pounds dried black-eyed peas
1 sweet onion, such as Vidalia, peeled and halved through the root end (keep the root attached)
4 whole cloves
1 garlic head, cut in half
10 black peppercorns
2 dried bay leaves
1 chile de árbol or other small dried chile
1 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
Hot sauce, to taste

Put the peas in a large bowl, add water to cover by 2 inches, and soak overnight.

Blacken the onion: If you have a gas stove, turn one burner on high and place the onion halves directly on the grates next to the flame and cook, turning occasionally, until the onion is charred on all sides, about 5 minutes. Otherwise, heat the broiler and broil the onion on a baking sheet a few inches from the heat, turning occasionally, until charred, 1 to 2 minutes. Set aside to cool.

When the onion is cool enough to handle, poke 2 cloves into each half, and add the onion to a large stockpot. Drain the peas, discarding the liquid, and then transfer the peas to the pot.

Place the garlic, peppercorns, bay leaves and chile on a 12-inch square of cheesecloth and wrap tightly, using twine to seal the packet.

Add 6 quarts water and the spice packet to the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Skim any foam that collects on the surface, then reduce to a simmer. Stir in the olive oil and 1 tablespoon salt and cook, stirring and skimming occasionally, until the peas are fully cooked and the cooking liquid has thickened, 1 to 2 hours.

Discard the spice packet, season with the remaining 1 tablespoon salt (or to taste) and the hot sauce and serve.

Baked Pasta with Cheddar and Spiced Onions

6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 large onions, thinly sliced
1 large bay leaf
1 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin
Pinch of cayenne, plus more to taste
1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt, plus more as needed
3 fat garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 (15-ounce) can whole peeled plum tomatoes
1 pound small pasta, such as rotini or shells
3/4 cup chopped parsley or cilantro (or use a combination of cilantro and parsley), plus more for serving
8 ounces shredded Cheddar
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
Hot sauce, for serving (optional)

Heat 1/4 cup oil in a 12-inch skillet over high heat. Add onions and bay leaf, and cook, stirring frequently, until softened and browned in spots, 12 to 20 minutes. (Reduce heat if the pan starts to scorch.) Lower heat to medium, and stir in coriander, ground cumin, cayenne and 1/4 teaspoon salt; cook 1 more minute. Transfer half the onions to a bowl and reserve (leave the bay leaf in the skillet).

Add garlic, cumin seeds, pepper and allspice to the skillet, and stir. Cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Pour in the juice from the canned tomatoes. Use your hands or kitchen scissors to squish or cut the tomatoes into pieces and add to pan. Fill the empty tomato can with water, and pour into the skillet. Add remaining 2 tablespoons oil and remaining 1 teaspoon salt, and bring mixture to a simmer. Simmer until thickened, about 20 minutes. Taste, and add more salt and cayenne if you like. Remove bay leaf.

As mixture cooks, heat oven to 400 degrees and bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook pasta until just about 2 minutes shy of al dente. Reserve 1 cup pasta water, and drain pasta.

Stir pasta, reserved pasta water, and parsley into skillet with tomato sauce. Top with reserved browned onions, Cheddar and Parmesan. Transfer to oven and bake until golden and bubbly, 20 to 25 minutes. If you like, you can run the pan under the broil to brown the top, or leave it as is. Let cool slightly, top with more parsley, if desired, and serve with hot sauce, if you like.