Best Lasagna

Ragù Bolognese

2 lb. ground pork
1 lb. ground beef chuck (20% fat)
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 oz. pancetta or slab bacon, chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 celery stalk, finely chopped
1 medium carrot, peeled, finely chopped
6 garlic cloves, sliced
2 Tbsp. tomato paste
3/4 cup dry white wine
1 28-oz. can whole peeled tomatoes
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1 cup whole milk
Béchamel

7 Tbsp. unsalted butter
1/4 cup plus 3 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
6 cups whole milk
4 oz. Parmesan, coarsely grated (about 1 cup)
Pinch of cayenne pepper
Pinch of ground nutmeg
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

1 1/4 lb. dried lasagna noodles (we like De Cecco since they are wide and short)
Kosher salt
Extra-virgin olive oil (for greasing)

Ragù Bolognese

Preheat oven to 225°. Mix pork and beef with your hands in a large bowl; season generously with salt and pepper, then mix again. Form into about 18 large meatballs (they don’t need to be perfect—you’ll be mashing them later).

Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high. Working in 2 batches, cook meatballs, turning occasionally and reducing heat if bottom of pot looks in danger of scorching, until browned all over, about 6 minutes per batch. Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet as they’re done.

Reduce heat to medium. Add pancetta and cook, stirring often, until lightly browned and beginning to crisp, about 5 minutes. Add onion, celery, carrot, and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 6–8 minutes. Add tomato paste and cook, stirring constantly, until paste darkens, about 2 minutes. Add wine and cook, stirring occasionally, until nearly completely evaporated, 4–5 minutes. Add tomatoes, crushing with your hands, and increase heat to medium-high. Cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is jammy and reduced by about half, 8–10 minutes. Add broth and milk and return meat to pot. Bring to a simmer. Cover pot, leaving lid slightly ajar, and transfer to oven. Bake sauce (no need to stir, but check after 1–2 hours to ensure liquid is at a low simmer, adjusting oven temperature as needed) until meatballs are falling-apart tender, 3–4 hours.

Using a potato masher, break meatballs apart and incorporate into liquid (you should have about 8 cups ragù); season with salt and pepper. Reduce over medium-low heat if needed to thicken.

Do Ahead: Sauce can be made 4 days ahead; let cool, then cover and chill, or freeze up to 3 months.
Béchamel

Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in flour and cook, whisking occasionally, until flour begins to smell a bit nutty, about 4 minutes. Quickly whisk in milk and increase heat to medium-high. Bring to a simmer and cook, whisking occasionally, until béchamel thickens, about 4 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, whisking occasionally, until smooth and velvety, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk in Parmesan, cayenne, and nutmeg (you should have about 6 cups); season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a large bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and use within 1 hour or chill.

Do Ahead: Béchamel can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled. Rewarm just enough to loosen before using.
Assembly

Preheat oven to 325°. Cook noodles in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally and separating noodles so they don’t stick to each other, until just starting to soften but still snap in half rather than bend when folded; 3 minutes is the magic number. They will be so firm it will just seem all wrong, but this is what separates al dente lasagna layers from gummy ones. Transfer noodles to a large bowl of cold water to cool. Drain and lie flat in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet, separated by parchment or wax paper.

Lightly oil a 13×9″ glass or ceramic baking dish. Spread 1½ cups ragù in dish. Lay a single layer of noodles over ragù (you will need to cut some noodles in half in order to fill all gaps). Spoon 1¼ cups béchamel over noodles, spreading in an even layer with a small offset spatula. Top béchamel with 1½ cups ragù. Repeat, creating 5 layers of pasta (or 6, depending on how deep your pan is) and ending with remaining 1 cup béchamel. It should come right to the top edge of the dish, and the top layer of pasta will get super crunchy when baked.

Cover with a lightly oiled piece of foil and set on a rimmed baking sheet (just to catch drips). Bake lasagna until bubbling gently around the edges, about 1 hour. Remove from oven and increase oven temperature to 425°; carefully place rack in top of oven. Uncover and continue to bake until top is browned and crisp around the edges, 10–15 minutes.

Let sit 10 minutes before serving.

Source: Bon Appetit

Lasagna Bolognese

Bolognese Sauce

1 large onion, coarsely chopped
1 medium carrot, peeled, coarsely chopped
1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pound ground beef chuck
1 pound ground pork
4 oz. pancetta (Italian bacon), finely chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup dry white wine
1 cup whole milk
1 14.5-oz. can crushed tomatoes
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth, divided
Fresh Pasta Dough and Noodles

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
3 cups all-purpose flour plus more
4 large eggs, room temperature

Béchamel

5 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
4 cups whole milk, warmed
pinch of freshly ground nutmeg
Kosher salt
Assembly

Kosher salt
Unsalted butter, room temperature (for dish)
2 cups finely grated Parmesan

Bolognese Sauce

Pulse onion, carrot, and celery in a food processor until finely chopped.

Heat oil in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Add beef, pork, pancetta, and vegetables; cook, breaking up meat with a spoon, until moisture is almost completely evaporated and meat is well browned, 25–30 minutes; season with salt and pepper.

Add wine to pot and bring to a boil, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pot, about 2 minutes. Add milk; bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until moisture is almost completely evaporated, 8–10 minutes. Add tomatoes and 2 cups broth; bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, adding water by ½-cupfuls if sauce looks dry, until flavors meld and sauce thickens, 2½–3 hours.

Let sauce cool, then cover and chill at least 12 hours or up to 2 days. (Letting the sauce sit will give it a deeper, richer flavor.)

DO AHEAD: Sauce can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.
Fresh Pasta Dough and Noodles

Whisk salt and 3 cups flour in a large bowl, make a well in the center, and crack eggs into well. Mix eggs with a fork, then slowly mix in flour until a shaggy dough forms. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead, dusting lightly with flour if sticky, until smooth, about 5 minutes (it will be fairly stiff). Wrap in plastic; let sit until dough holds an indentation when pressed, 1–2 hours.

Set pasta maker to thickest setting; dust lightly with flour. Divide dough into 4 pieces. Working with 1 piece at a time and keeping remaining dough wrapped in plastic as you work, flatten dough into a narrow rectangle (no wider than mouth of machine); pass through rollers. Fold dough as needed to fit and run through again. Repeat without folding, adjusting machine to thinner settings after every pass and dusting with flour if sticky, until pasta sheet is 1/16” thick (setting 8 on most machines). Place pasta sheets on a lightly floured surface and cut crosswise into 16 8”-long noodles.

DO AHEAD: Dough can be made 1 day ahead; chill. Bring to room temperature before rolling out, about 1 hour. Noodles can be made 1 day ahead. Stack on a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper between each layer. Cover with plastic wrap and chill.
Béchamel

Heat butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat until foaming. Add flour and cook, whisking constantly, 1 minute. Whisk in warm milk, ½-cupful at a time. Bring sauce to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, whisking often, until the consistency of cream, 8–10 minutes; add nutmeg and season with salt. Remove from heat, transfer to a medium bowl, and press plastic wrap directly onto surface; let cool slightly.

DO AHEAD: Béchamel can be made 1 day ahead. Keep covered and chill.

Reheat the sauces. Combine Bolognese sauce and remaining 1 cup broth in a large saucepan over medium heat, and heat until sauce is warmed through.

Meanwhile, if you made the béchamel ahead of time, heat in a medium saucepan over low heat just until warmed through (you don’t want to let it boil).

Working in batches, cook fresh lasagna noodles in a large pot of boiling salted water until just softened, about 10 seconds. Remove carefully with tongs and transfer to a large bowl of ice water; let cool. Drain noodles and stack on a baking sheet, with paper towels between each layer, making sure noodles don’t touch (they’ll stick together).

Preheat oven to 350°. Coat a 13×9” baking dish with butter.

Spread 1/4 cup béchamel in the prepared baking dish. Top with a layer of noodles, spread over a scant 3/4 cup Bolognese sauce, then 1/2 cup béchamel, and top with 1/4 cup Parmesan. Repeat process 7 more times, starting with noodles and ending with Parmesan, for a total of 8 layers. Place baking dish on a rimmed baking sheet and bake lasagna until bubbling and beginning to brown on top, 50–60 minutes. Let lasagna sit 45 minutes before serving.

DO AHEAD: Lasagna can be assembled 12 hours ahead. Cover and chill. Let sit at room temperature 2 hours before baking. Cook, covered with foil until the last 20 minutes, then finish cooking uncovered.

Homemade pasta is great: It’s rich and can be rolled very thin. But of course it’s not your only option: Fresh store-bought: Available in the refrigerated section of specialty stores and Italian grocers. Usually a bit thicker than what our recipe calls for but still a good choice. Buy 1 1/2 pounds. Sizes vary by shop; if needed, trim the noodles during assembly to fill the pan without much overlap. Dried: If you spot imported dried egg noodles, they’re worth the splurge, but standard supermarket durum wheat will work just fine (avoid no-boil, though). Supermarket noodles are thicker, so make fewer layers. Cook 24 noodles (1–1½ boxes) per package instructions; divide sauces evenly among 6 layers. Trim noodles as needed.

Source: Bon Appetit

Moussaka

Eggplant and Lamb

8 garlic cloves, finely grated, divided
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons chopped mint, divided
2 tablespoons chopped oregano, divided
3 medium eggplants (about 3½ pounds total), sliced crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick rounds
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more
2 pounds ground lamb
2 medium onions, chopped
1 3-inch cinnamon stick
2 Fresno chiles, finely chopped
1 tablespoon paprika
1 tablespoon tomato paste
3/4 cup dry white wine
1 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes

Béchamel and Assembly

6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
2 1/3 cups whole milk, warmed
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
4 ounces farmer cheese, crumbled (about 1 cup)
2 ounces Pecorino or Parmesan, finely grated (about 1¾ cups), divided
3 large egg yolks, beaten to blend

Eggplant and Lamb

Place a rack in middle of oven; preheat to 475°. Whisk half of the garlic, ½ cup oil, 1 Tbsp. mint, and 1 Tbsp. oregano in a small bowl. Brush both sides of eggplant rounds with herb oil, making sure to get all the herbs and garlic onto eggplant; season with salt and pepper. Transfer eggplant to a rimmed baking sheet (it’s okay to pile the rounds on top of each other) and roast until tender and browned, 35–45 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400°.

Meanwhile, heat remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a large wide pot over high. Cook lamb, breaking up with a spoon, until browned on all sides and cooked through and liquid from meat is evaporated (there will be a lot of rendered fat), 12–16 minutes. Strain fat through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean small bowl and transfer lamb to a medium bowl. Reserve 3 Tbsp. lamb fat; discard remaining fat.

Heat 2 Tbsp. lamb fat in same pot over medium-high (reserve remaining 1 Tbsp. lamb fat for assembling the moussaka). Add onion, cinnamon, 2½ tsp. salt, and ½ tsp. pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is tender and translucent, 8–10 minutes. Add chiles and remaining garlic and cook, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pot, until onion is golden brown, about 5 minutes. Add paprika and tomato paste and cook until brick red in color, about 1 minute. Add wine and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly reduced and no longer smells of alcohol, about 3 minutes. Add tomatoes and break up with a wooden spoon into small pieces (the seeds will shoot out at you if you’re too aggressive, so start slowly—puncture the tomato, then get your smash and break on!). Add lamb and remaining 1 Tbsp. mint and 1 Tbsp. oregano and cook, stirring occasionally, until most of the liquid is evaporated and mixture looks like a thick meat sauce, 5–7 minutes. Pluck out and discard cinnamon stick.

Béchamel and Assembly

Heat butter in a medium saucepan over medium until foaming. Add flour and cook, whisking constantly, until combined, about 1 minute. Whisk in warm milk and bring sauce to a boil. Cook béchamel, whisking often, until very thick (it should have the consistency of pudding), about 5 minutes; stir in salt. Remove from heat and whisk in farmer cheese and half of the Pecorino. Let sit 10 minutes for cheese to melt, then add egg yolks and vigorously whisk until combined and béchamel is golden yellow.

Brush a 13×9″ baking pan with remaining 1 Tbsp. lamb fat. Layer half of eggplant in pan, covering the bottom entirely. Spread half of lamb mixture over eggplant in an even layer. Repeat with remaining eggplant and lamb to make another layer of each. Top with béchamel and smooth surface; sprinkle with remaining Pecorino.

Bake moussaka until bubbling vigorously and béchamel is browned in spots, 30–45 minutes. Let cool 30 minutes before serving.

Do Ahead: Moussaka can be baked 1 day ahead. Let cool, then cover and chill, or freeze up to 3 months. Thaw before reheating in a 250° oven until warmed through, about 1 hour.

Source: Bon Appetit

Pressure Cooker Coq au Vin

4 chicken legs (thigh and drumstick)
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
2 cups dry white wine
1 bunch thyme, divided
4 oz. thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into ¾” pieces
8 oz. shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, caps torn into 3 pieces
4 Tbsp. unsalted butter, divided
8 oz. carrots, peeled, cut crosswise into 4″ pieces
4 shallots, peeled
2 garlic cloves, smashed
2 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
Handful of chopped parsley

Pat chicken dry with paper towels; season aggressively with salt and pepper. Transfer chicken to a 1-gallon resealable bag or an 8×8″ glass baking dish. Pour wine over, then add ½ bunch thyme. Turn to coat, seal bag or cover baking dish, and let sit at room temperature while you prep the other ingredients. (Or, chill up to 48 hours.)

Cook bacon in a 10″ or 12″ nonstick skillet, preferably not cast iron, over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown and crisp but all of the fat hasn’t rendered out, 8–10 minutes. Transfer to a plate with a slotted spoon. (Medium heat lets you work in batches without having to worry about scorching your pan, and you’ll eventually use all the browned bits to build a deeply flavored braising liquid.)

Add mushrooms to bacon drippings in pan; season with salt. Cook, tossing occasionally, until tender and golden brown but not crisp, about 6 minutes. Scrape mushrooms into Instant Pot insert and reserve pan.

Meanwhile, remove chicken from marinade and place on a large plate; reserve marinade but pluck out and discard thyme sprigs. Pat chicken skin dry with paper towels. Heat 2 Tbsp. butter in reserved pan over medium. If you’re using a 10″ skillet, you’ll have to do this in 2 batches, but chicken should all fit in a larger pan. As soon as butter is foaming, add chicken, placing skin side down, and cook, undisturbed, until skin is dark golden brown and plenty of fat is cooked out, 10–12 minutes. Turn onto flesh side and cook until pale golden brown underneath, about 2 minutes. Nestle chicken into pot insert.

Pour off all but about 1 Tbsp. accumulated drippings in pan (save it—this is a cross between clarified butter and schmaltz and can be used to sauté or roast basically anything). Add carrots, shallots, and garlic; season lightly with salt. Cook, tossing often, until shallots are golden brown in spots, about 4 minutes. Add to pot insert along with half of the reserved bacon.

Return pan to medium heat and pour in vinegar. Cook, scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until syrupy, about 3 minutes. Add reserved wine marinade and remaining ½ bunch thyme and bring to a simmer. Cook, stirring and scraping bottom of pan, until reduced by half, 5–7 minutes.

Pour liquid over chicken and seal pot. Set for “Pressure Cook,” high, 15 minutes. Let natural release 10 minutes, then unseal.

Meanwhile, smash flour and remaining 2 Tbsp. butter together with a fork in a small bowl until well combined.

Transfer chicken legs and vegetables to a platter or plates. Pluck out and discard thyme sprigs from liquid. Add butter-flour mixture to liquid and whisk to melt. Bring to a simmer on high “Sauté” setting and cook to thicken sauce, about 3 minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning, if needed. Stir in parsley.

Serve coq au vin with braising liquid poured over and all around. Sprinkle remaining reserved bacon over.

Cassoulet

Duck Confit:
6 duck legs
6 Tbsp. Diamond Crystal or 3 Tbsp. plus 2½ tsp. Morton kosher salt
4 sprigs thyme
4 garlic cloves, smashed
2 tsp. black peppercorns
1 tsp. juniper berries (optional)

Beans:
2 whole cloves
1 large onion, peeled, halved through root end
1 1/2 lb. dried Tarbais, corona, or cannellini beans, soaked overnight, drained
8 oz. pancetta (leave in 1 thick piece)
2 carrots, scrubbed, halved crosswise if large
1 head of garlic, halved crosswise
4 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
Freshly ground black pepper
Kosher salt

Pork Ragù:

1 1/2 lb. skinless, boneless pork shoulder (Boston butt), cut into 1″ pieces
1 1/2 tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more
Freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
1 large carrot, peeled, chopped
1 large carrot, peeled, chopped
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
4 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
1 14.5-oz. can crushed tomatoes
6 cups chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth
Assembly

Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
1 lb. fresh pork sausage (such as Toulouse, sweet Italian, or unsmoked kielbasa)
3 cups medium-fine fresh breadcrumbs, divided
1/4 cup finely chopped parsley
1 garlic clove, halved lengthwise
1 lb. precooked garlic sausage, sliced crosswise ¼” thick (optional)

Two Days Ahead

Cure Duck Legs

Prick skin on duck legs all over with the tip of a paring knife. Rub legs with salt, making sure to massage into flesh and skin.

Place legs in a large bowl and cover with plastic wrap, pressing directly onto legs. Rest a plate on top of legs and weigh down with several 28-oz. cans. Chill at least 12 hours and up to 1 day.

Note: If you’re going to cook the beans and ragout and combine tomorrow, soak the beans tonight. If not, just remember to soak them the day before you want to cook them.
One Day Ahead

Confit Duck Legs

Preheat oven to 250°. Evenly scatter thyme, garlic, peppercorns, and juniper berries (if using) across a large baking dish or roasting pan and add 2 Tbsp. water.

Remove duck legs from bowl. Rinse off salt and arrange legs, skin side down, over aromatics in baking dish. Cover dish tightly with foil and weigh down with a cast-iron skillet or a heavy baking dish. Bake until fat renders out of duck and legs are submerged, about 2 hours.

Carefully remove baking dish from oven and remove skillet and foil. Turn legs skin side up and nestle back into fat. Cover dish again with foil and continue to cook legs, unweighted, until duck meat is very tender and bones wiggle easily in joints, 2–2½ hours longer.

Let legs cool in fat until you can handle them, then transfer with tongs or a spider to a plate. Strain ¼ cup fat through a fine-mesh sieve into a small bowl and let cool. Cover and set aside for cooking the breadcrumbs. Strain remaining fat into an airtight container; cover and reserve for another use (like roasting potatoes).

Remove skin from legs, trying to keep as intact as possible; transfer skin to an airtight container. Cover and chill. Pull duck meat from bones, tearing into 2″ pieces; discard bones and cartilage. Place meat in another airtight container; cover and chill. You won’t need the skin, meat, or fat until you’re ready to assemble the cassoulet.

Do Ahead: Duck legs can be confited 3 weeks ahead. Transfer legs to a large nonreactive vessel; strain fat through a fine-mesh sieve over meat. Cover and chill. Let come to room temperature before using. Meat and skin can be prepared 3 days ahead; keep chilled.
Cook the Beans

Stick a clove into each onion half. Place in a large pot along with beans, pancetta, carrots, garlic, thyme, and bay leaf; pour in cold water to cover beans by 2″. Season with several grinds of pepper and bring to a gentle simmer. Partially cover pot and cook beans, skimming surface occasionally and adding more water as needed to keep beans submerged and seasoning with a couple of pinches of salt after about 30 minutes, until beans are tender but not falling apart, 45–60 minutes for cannellini and 1–1½ hours for Tarbais or corona. Remove pot from heat; pluck out and discard onion, carrots, garlic, thyme, and bay leaf. Transfer pancetta to a cutting board; let cool slightly, then cut into 1x¼” pieces. Add back to pot and let mixture cool.

Cook Ragout

Meanwhile, sprinkle pork with 1½ tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt and several grinds of pepper. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven or other heavy pot over medium-high. Working in 2 batches, cook pork, turning once, until browned all over, 10–12 minutes per batch; transfer to a plate as you go.

Reduce heat to medium and place onion, carrot, and garlic in pot; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned, 8–10 minutes. Return pork to pot and add thyme, bay leaf, tomatoes, and stock. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, partially cover pot, and simmer gently, skimming fat occasionally, until meat is fork-tender, 1¾–2 hours. Pluck out and discard thyme and bay leaf. Let ragout cool slightly.

Combine Beans and Ragout

Using a slotted spoon, transfer bean mixture to pot with ragout. Add enough cooking liquid from beans just to cover. Pour remaining bean cooking liquid into an airtight container and chill; you may need it for finishing the cassoulet later. Let ragout mixture cool completely, then cover and chill at least 12 hours.

Do Ahead: Ragout and beans can be combined 2 days ahead. Keep chilled.
The Day Of

Temper and Season Ragout Mixture

Remove ragout mixture from refrigerator and skim fat from surface; discard. Cover pot and bring ragout to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat. Taste and season conservatively with salt and pepper if needed (the duck will add considerable saltiness when mixed in).

Prepare Sausage and Breadcrumbs

Remove reserved duck meat and skin from refrigerator. Let meat come to room temperature.

Meanwhile, arrange skin in a single layer in an 8-qt. Dutch oven or other heavy pot (the same one you’ll cook the cassoulet in). Cook over low heat, turning occasionally, until golden brown and crisp, 20–30 minutes. Using tongs, transfer skin to paper towels and blot away excess fat.

Prick pork sausages all over with a fork and cook in fat in same pot, turning occasionally, until browned all over and cooked through, 12–15 minutes. Transfer to a plate and let cool slightly. Cut into 2″ pieces.

Add breadcrumbs to pot and cook, stirring often, until golden in spots and starting to crisp, about 5 minutes. If breadcrumbs seem very dry or are sticking to the pot, add 1–2 Tbsp. reserved duck fat. Transfer breadcrumbs to a medium bowl and let cool slightly. Add parsley and toss to combine. Wipe out pot and let cool.

Layer Cassoulet

Rub inside of cooled pot with cut sides of garlic; ladle in one-third of ragout mixture. Top with half of pork sausage, garlic sausage, and duck meat, then another third of ragout mixture. Top with remaining duck meat and sausages, then remaining ragout mixture. Liquid should come to top of beans. Add reserved bean cooking liquid if needed.

Do Ahead: Cassoulet can be assembled 1 day ahead; cover and chill. Bring to room temperature before proceeding. Store breadcrumbs and duck skin separately airtight at room temperature.
Bake Cassoulet

Preheat oven to 375°. Scatter two-thirds of breadcrumb mixture over cassoulet.

Bake, uncovered, until a golden crust forms, 25–30 minutes. Remove from oven and use a spoon to break up crust, pressing very gently so crust absorbs a little liquid; smooth surface. Bake until another crust forms, 25–30 minutes; break up again. Repeat process 2 more times (for a total of 4 times). If mixture starts to look dry, moisten with a bit of reserved bean cooking liquid when breaking up the crust.

Top cassoulet with remaining breadcrumb mixture; bake until golden brown, 15–20 minutes. Let rest at least 25 minutes before serving.

Divide cassoulet among bowls; crumble duck skin over.

Source: Bon Appetit

Enriched Chicken Stock

2 tablespoons pure olive oil
1 pound chicken wings
1 pound lean beef brisket, cut into 1-inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper
3 medium carrots, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
1 small celery root (10 ounces), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch dice
1 large tomato, cored and quartered
6 cups canned low-sodium chicken broth

Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the chicken wings and beef and cook over moderately high heat until browned all over, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and add the carrots, onion, celery root and tomato. Cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are barely softened, about 10 minutes.

Add the broth to the pan and bring to a boil. Cover partially and cook over moderately low heat for 30 minutes. Strain the stock, reserving the meat and vegetables for another use. Refrigerate the stock and remove the fat from the surface before using or freezing.

Make Ahead: The stock can be frozen for up to 1 month.

Duck Breasts in Muscat and Orange Juice

1 cup Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise or ruby port
1 cup fresh orange juice
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Four 6-ounce boneless duck breasts, fat trimmed to 1/8 inch thick and scored
1 1/2 cups Enriched Chicken Stock
Salt and freshly ground pepper

In a large baking dish, mix the Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise with the orange juice, soy sauce, lime juice and olive oil. Add the duck breasts and marinate for 4 hours or overnight in the refrigerator.

Remove the duck breasts from the marinade and pat dry with paper towels. Pour the marinade into a medium saucepan and add the Enriched Chicken Stock. Boil over moderately high heat until reduced to 1/3 cup and syrupy, about 35 minutes.

Heat a large nonstick skillet. Add the duck breasts skin side down and season with salt and pepper. Cook the breasts over moderate heat until the skin is very crisp, about 5 minutes. Turn the breasts, cover and cook until the meat is rare, about 3 minutes. Transfer the breasts to a carving board, cover loosely with foil and let stand for 5 minutes. Slice the duck crosswise 1/4 inch thick and arrange on plates. Pass the sauce at the table.

Pomegranate Jalapeno Glazed Ham

One 7-pound, bone-in, spiral-cut smoked ham
1 cup chicken stock or low-sodium broth
20 whole cloves
One 10-ounce jar jalapeño jelly (1 cup)
1 cup sweetened pomegranate juice
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

Preheat the oven to 325°. Place the ham in a large roasting pan and add the chicken stock. Stud the ham all over with the cloves.

In a medium saucepan, bring the jalapeño jelly, pomegranate juice and lemon juice to a boil. Simmer over moderate heat until slightly thickened, 10 minutes. Whisk in the mustard, cinnamon and ginger and simmer until reduced to about 1 1/4 cups, about 5 minutes.

Drizzle half of the glaze over the ham and cover with foil. Roast for 1 1/2 hours, basting frequently, until a thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the ham registers 125°. Remove the foil and brush the ham with any remaining glaze. Roast for 30 minutes longer, until the top is lightly caramelized. Transfer to a platter. Discard the cloves. Pour the pan juices into a bowl and serve with the ham.

Horseradish-Crusted Roast Beef

One 6-pound sirloin tip roast, preferably grass-fed, tied
1/2 cup prepared horseradish
2 tablespoons kosher salt
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

Preheat the oven to 375°. Set a rack in a large, deep roasting pan and place the beef roast on the rack.

In a small bowl, blend the horseradish with the salt, Dijon mustard, chopped parsley, ground pepper, sugar and sherry vinegar to form a paste. Slather the paste all over the top and sides of the meat. Roast in the lower third of the oven for about 2 hours, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the roast registers 125°. Transfer the roast to a cutting board and let rest for at least 20 minutes.

Discard the string and thinly slice the roast beef across the grain. Transfer the meat to a platter and serve.

Serve with mashed potatoes

Make Ahead:

The unsliced roast beef can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. The sliced roast beef can be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated overnight.