Suya-Spiced Pan-Roasted Pork Tenderloin

2 teaspoons sweet paprika
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
2 1¼-pound pork tenderloins, trimmed of silver skin and halved crosswise
2 tablespoons grapeseed or other neutral oil
2 teaspoons packed light brown sugar
¾ cup low-sodium chicken broth
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) salted butter, cut into 8 pieces and chilled
2 tablespoons lime juice
1/3 cup roasted, unsalted peanuts, finely chopped

Heat the oven to 450°F with a rack in the middle position. In a large bowl, stir together the paprika, ginger, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne and 1 teaspoon each salt and black pepper.

Add the pork, turn to coat and massage the spice mixture into the meat. Let stand at room temperature for 15 minutes.

In an oven-safe 12-inch skillet over medium-high, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the pork and cook, turning occasionally with tongs, until browned on all sides, about 4 minutes total.
Transfer the skillet to the oven and roast until the center of the thickest tenderloin reaches 140°F, 10 to 15 minutes.

Transfer the skillet to the stovetop (the handle will be hot). Using tongs, transfer the pork to a large plate and let rest for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, add the sugar and broth to the skillet.

Bring to a simmer over medium-high, scraping up any browned bits, and cook until reduced to 1/2 cup and slightly thickened, about 2 minutes.

While whisking constantly, add the butter 1 piece at a time; add the next piece only after the previous one is almost fully incorporated.

After all the butter is incorporated, stir in the lime juice and cook until a spatula drawn through the sauce leaves a trail, about 20 seconds.

Off heat, stir in the peanuts, then taste the sauce and season with salt and black pepper. Thinly slice the tenderloins and arrange on a platter.

Stir any accumulated pork juices into the sauce, then spoon the sauce over the pork.

Sate Lilit Bali (Minced Meat Satay on Lemongrass Skewers)

1/2 lbs minced duck or chicken meat
2 cups grated unsweetened coconut
2 oz gula jawa / Indonesian palm sugar (finely chopped)
1 tsp salt
3 Tbsp cooking oil (and extra for brushing)
About 10 stalks of lemongrass or 20 bamboo skewers

Ground spices:
5 shallots (peeled)
7 cloves garlic (peeled)
1- inch galangal (peeled)
1- inch kencur/Kaempferia galanga (peeled) or substitute with 1/2 galangal and 1/2 ginger if you must
2- inch turmeric (peeled)
2 tsp coriander seeds
5 candlenuts/kemiri sub with macadamia nuts or omit if you must
1 tsp shrimp paste/ belacan
4 kaffir lime leaves Cut off the tough vein in the middle
1/2 lemongrass stalk cut into 1-inch piece
2 cloves
5 Thai red chilis remove stems (optional)
1/4 tsp grated nutmeg

Sauce:
4-5 red chili (seeded and finely chopped)
1/4 cup kecap manis / Indonesian sweet soy sauce
1/4 cup fried shallot crisps/ bawang goreng

Place all the ground spices ingredients in a food processor and process into a paste. Add a bit of water to help it going
If you use bamboo skewers, soak the bamboo skewers in water for few minutes. If you use lemongrass as skewers, cut the stalks into half and get rid of extra layers if necessary.

Preheat 3 Tbsp of oil in a wok or skillet. Add in the ground spices and saute until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Remove from the wok or skillet and let it cool down completely.

In a large mixing bowl, mix the meat with the spice paste above, coconut, palm sugar, and salt. They should come together nicely without falling apart.

With clean hands, scoop up about 2-3 Tbsp of the meat mixture and mold it onto the bamboo or lemongrass skewers. Repeat until you are done with the meat and skewers.

Preheat the grill. Brush the sate with a bit of oil and grill the sate until cooked and golden brown all over. You can also use grill pan for this purpose. Serve with the sauce.

Ayam Suwir Pedas Bali (Ayam Sisit Bali-Balinese Shredded Chicken)

Ingredients
300 gr cooked chicken meat shredded, or use 500 gr uncooked chicken
1 Tbsp cooking oil
100 ml coconut cream
2 Tbsp water or chicken broth from cooking the chicken

Ground spice paste:
4 Tbsp sambal oelek adjust the amount if you want it less or more spicy
4 Thai red chili remove stems
1 small red onion peeled and quartered
4 garlic peeled

Other ingredients:
1 Tbsp turmeric powder
3 Tbsp galangal powder

Herbs:
2 stalks lemongrass
5 bay leaves (daun salam)
5 kaffir-lime leaves

Seasonings:
2 Tbsp coconut sugar or to taste
1 tsp salt or to taste
2 Tbsp Tamarind juice

Prepare the spice paste:

Place red onion, garlic, and sambal oelek in a food processor and grind into a paste

Cook the spicy sambal paste:
Preheat 1 Tbsp cooking oil in a wok or skillet. Add the spice paste, turmeric and galangal powder, and herbs. Stir fry until really aromatic, about 5 minutes. Add water and continue to stir fry for another 3 minutes

Add the coconut cream and stir to mix. Add the shredded chicken in and cook until the mixture is still moist but no more runny juice. Have a taste and adjust seasonings to your liking. It should be spicy, savory, a hint of tartness and sweetness.

Notes: WHAT TO SERVE WITH AYAM SUWIR PEDAS BALI

– NASI CAMPUR BALI: In Bali, ayam suwir is served with nasi campur (mixed rice). Meaning, white rice served with few other entrees such as fried chicken, hard-boiled eggs or omelet and side dishes like fresh slices of cucumber, tomatoes, Indonesian-style salad, sate lilit Bali, sate ayam kecap, crackers, etc. You don’t have to have all of those, but usually a combination of those.

– PLAIN RICE WILL DO TOO: Serve with white rice and few slices of fresh cucumber and tomatoes and trust me.

Peking Duck and Mandarin Pancakes

For the duck:
4 boneless duck breasts (about 6-7 oz./170-200g each with the skin on; rinsed and thoroughly patted dry with a paper towel)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine
1/8 teaspoon five spice powder
1 tablespoon oil

For the mandarin pancakes:
1 1/2 cups flour (200g)
1/8 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup boiling water (160 ml)
1 teaspoon oil

For the fixings:
1 cucumber (de-seeded and julienned)
1/2 cup cantaloupe (julienned, optional)
2 scallions (julienned)
3 cloves garlic (finely minced and mixed with 1 teaspoon oil to make a paste, optional)
3 tablespoons hoisin sauce

Marinate the duck:

Mix the salt, soy sauce, wine, and five spice powder in a small bowl and massage into the duck. Leave the duck breasts skin side up on a plate uncovered, and let sit in the refrigerator overnight to marinate and to let the skin dry out. (If you don’t want to wait overnight, reduce the marinating time to 30 minutes).

Prepare mandarin pancakes:
Mix the flour and salt in a heatproof bowl. Pour the boiling hot water into the flour mixture and use chopsticks or a spatula to mix until a dough ball forms. Once it is cool enough to handle, knead the dough for 8 minutes until smooth, adding flour if the dough is too sticky.

Cover with plastic and allow the dough to rest at room temperature for at least 1 hour.

Roll the dough into a cylinder and cut into 12 equal pieces. Form each piece into a dough ball, then flatten them out into a small disc about 2 inches in diameter. Lightly brush 6 of the discs with oil, ensuring the sides of the discs are also brushed with oil.

Layer the remaining 6 discs over the 6 oiled discs so you have 6 pieces, each comprised of 2 discs.

Use a rolling pin to roll the discs into 7-inch circles, flipping the pancakes frequently so both of the dough discs are rolled into the same size.

Heat a wok or frying pan over medium low heat, and place one pancake into the pan. After 30 to 45 seconds, you should see air pockets begin to form between the two pancakes. Flip the pancake; it should be white with just a couple of faint brown patches. Any more than that, and they are overcooked.

After another 30 seconds, the air pockets should be large enough to separate the two pancakes. Remove the pancake to a plate, and let it cool for another 30 seconds. Now carefully pull apart the two pancakes at the seams. Place finished pancakes onto a plate and cover with a warm kitchen towel. Repeat until all pancakes are done.

The pancakes can be reheated in a steamer for about a minute when ready to serve. They also keep in the freezer for up to 3 weeks if you decide to make a larger batch.

Cook the duck and assemble:

Next, preheat the oven broiler on low heat. Heat an oven-proof pan over medium-high heat, and add 1 tablespoon of oil to coat the pan.

Sear the duck breasts, skin side down. Move them frequently so the skin crisps up and fries in the duck fat that renders out.

After 8 minutes, or when the duck skin is golden brown and a little bit crispy, carefully drain off the duck fat and discard (or save for later application to other recipes). In the pan, flip the duck breasts (so they are skin side up), and transfer them to the broiler for about 3 minutes. Be careful not to burn the skin, which at this point should be a bit crispy.

Remove the duck from the broiler and let rest for 10 to 15 minutes. The duck will be cooked about medium well and will be very juicy. Transfer to a cutting board and, using a sharp knife, cut into thin slices.

Serve the duck with your warmed pancakes, fixings, and sauce.