Quick Pickled Turnips

1 bunch hakurei turnips (approximately six, see note)
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
3 thin slices of ginger

Wash turnips well and slice them thinly on a mandolin. Place turnip slices in a small bowl and toss with the salt. Let rest until there is a pool of liquid on the bottom of the bowl, about 30 minutes. Drain turnips of the salty water and pack into a pint sized mason jar.

Add vinegar, sugar, pepper and ginger slices. Apply a watertight lid and shake to combine. Place pickled turnips in the fridge and chill before eating. Pickles can be eaten within an hour of being made and will keep for at least a week.

Alternative recipe:

Japanese Quick Pickled Turnips

Ingredients

5-6 small – medium turnips (9 – 10 oz.)
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tbsp mirin (sweet rice wine)
1 whole dried red chile
1 small piece of ginger – julienne
1 zipper bag

Wash turnips well especially inside of the leaves. Cut off the leaves about one inch from the top of the turnips. Peel and slice turnips into about 3mm thick. Cut the leaves into 4cm(1.5inch) long.

Put sliced turnips, a handfull of leaves and salt into a zipper bag and squeeze them to coat salt into all the turnips. Massage them for a few more minutes until the turnips soften.

Add the rest of the ingredients and massage them again. Seal the zipper bag and refrigerate at least 1 hour up to 6 hours.

Drain all the liquid and serve them in a small bowl. You can put some soy sauce on top when you eat.

Pickled Japanese Turnips

2 lb. Hakurei Turnips, cleaned and greens trimmed
3 cups Water
3 cups rice vinegar
1 1/2 Tablespoons pickling salt
6 Tablespoons sugar or 3/4 cup mirin – sweet rice wine
3-inch piece of ginger peeled and sliced thin

Heat a pot of boiling water enough to blanch the turnips. Combine the water, sugar or mirin, vinegar and salt and bring to a boil. Blanch the turnips for 30 seconds in the boiling water and remove.

Have hot jars ready. Add a few slices of ginger to them. Pack with the turnips just out of the boiling water. Pour over the pickling solution. Follow the canning directions below. The turnips should have a little crunch left in them after they are opened.

Can the jars in a hot water bath or keep in the refrigerator for up to a month.

Momofuku Turnip Pickle

1 pound turnips, peeled and sliced paper thin
2 (4-inch-by-2-1/2-inch) pieces kombu
1 cup rice vinegar
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup water
2 tablespoons kosher salt

Place the turnips and kombu in a 1-quart jar, leaving at least 1/2 inch of room at the top of the jar.

Make the brine: Place the vinegar, sugar, water, and salt in a small saucepan, whisk to dissolve the sugar and salt, and bring to a rapid simmer.

Immediately pour the brine over the turnips, making sure to cover them completely but leaving 1/4 inch of room at the top of the jar. Let cool to room temperature, about 1 hour.

Cover the jar with a tightfitting lid. Shake the jar or turn it upside down to evenly distribute the brine, then place it in the refrigerator for at least 1 day and preferably 1 week before using. (The pickled turnips can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 2 months.)

Japanese Spicy Pickled Daikon (with Korean, Chinese, and Indian Variations)

1 pound daikon radish
15ml (1 tbsp) table salt
125ml (1/2 cup) sugar
125ml (1/2 cup) apple cider vinegar
125ml (1/2 cup) water
30ml (2 tbsp) sea salt
2 red chillies, washed and finely sliced
60ml (4 tbsp) dill, washed and chopped
Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired.

Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.

Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and chillies in a saucepan and bring to a boil.

Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

Squeeze the excess moisture out of the radish.

Layer the vegetable along with sprinklings of dill in a sterilised, airtight storage container.

Pour in the pickling liquid, ensuring all surfaces of the radish are covered.

Wait for at least 2 days, but preferably 1 month, for the flavours to develop.

Variations:

Korean Pickled Daikon
You can easily turn this pickled dikon recipe into a kimchi-style recipe. All you need to make this a kimchi pickled daikon recipe is the chilli paste kimchi is made with. This includes the Sunchang Gochujang hot pepper paste. Just mix as much hot pepper paste as you see fit.

Chinese Pickled Daikon
You can easily make a Chinese-style pickled daikon. Simply add the following traditional Chinese ingredients and spices below, such as:

star anise
cloves
cassia or Chinese cinnamon
sesame seed oil
fennel seeds

You can also consider these additional ingredients:

cabbage
Korean radish
carrots
scallions
zucchini
gingergarlic
turmeric

Pickled Mooli
You can also make this an Indian-style recipe. Just add some turmeric powder or these turmeric substitutes. Next add ginger, curry powder, garam masala mix and fresh chillies or chilli paste. This way you can incorporate as much Indian flavour as possible.

Takuan (Japanese Pickled Daikon)

1 daikon radish
15ml (1 tbsp) salt
125ml (1/2 cup) sugar
125ml (1/2 cup) rice wine vinegar
5ml (1 tsp) ground turmeric
125ml (1/2 cup) water

Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired.

Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.

Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and turmeric in a saucepan and bring to a boil.

Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

Squeeze the excess moisture out of the radish and place the vegetable in a sterilised, airtight storage container.

Pour in the pickling liquid, ensure all surfaces of the radish are covered.

Wait for at least 2 days, but preferably 1 month, for the flavours to develop.