Caldo Tlepeno (Mexican Chickpeas, Chicken, and Chipotles)

Serves 4–6

1 cup dried Garbanzo Beans
1/2 white onion, minced
2 chipotle chiles in adobo sauce, roughly chopped, with seeds and sauce
1 cup chopped tomatoes
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon good-quality lard or olive oil
6 cups chicken broth
1 cup peeled and sliced carrots
2 small zucchini, sliced
1 cup shredded cooked chicken
Avocado cubes for garnish
Lime wedges for serving

Cook the garbanzo beans. Drain, then set aside.

In a blender, combine the onion, chipotle chiles, tomatoes, and garlic and puree until smooth.

In a stockpot or large saucepan, heat the lard over medium heat. Add the pureed vegetables and fry, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes. Pour in the broth, bring just to a simmer, and simmer uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Add the garbanzos, carrots, and zucchini and continue to simmer until the carrots and zucchini are barely cooked, about 8 minutes.

Add the chicken and continue to simmer until the vegetables are just cooked and the chicken and garbanzos are heated through.

Ladle the soup into warmed individual bowls, garnish with avocado, and serve immediately. Pass the lime wedges at the table.

Caribbean Red Beans and Rice

Serves 4 to 6, doubles like a dream

2 cups cooked Rancho Gordo Domingo Rojo beans or pigeon peas
2-1/2-cups brown rice, cooked and cooled
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 green or red pepper, chopped
1/4 habañero (Scotch bonnet pepper) or 1 to 2 jalapeños, seeded and chopped, depending on how hot you like it*
2 celery stalks, chopped
1 tomato, chopped (or 1 cup canned diced tomatoes, drained)
1 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1 small handful fresh thyme leaves, or ¼ teaspoon dried
1 small bunch cilantro, coarsely chopped
Sea salt and pepper to taste

In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat.

Add the onion and garlic, and sauté until softened, about 5 minutes.

Add the pepper, habañero, and celery, and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, for another 5 minutes.

Stir in the diced tomato and season with the allspice and cumin.

Add the cooked Domingo Rojo beans and rice, stirring until the mixture is well combined. Reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the moisture from the vegetables is absorbed, about 10 minutes.

Add the thyme, cilantro, sea salt, and pepper.

Red (or Black) Beans and Rice

1 pound dried beans, such as Red Nightfall or Sangre de Toro
1 large onion, finely chopped
1 small green pepper, finely chopped
2 celery stalks, finely chopped
3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 fresh jalapeño, finely chopped
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
10 1/2-ounce can chicken broth
1 cup red wine
3 cups of water
1 bay leaf
1 pound smoked ham hocks
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 cups hot white rice

Chopped scallions for garnish

Wash beans well and sort through them, removing any pebbles or impurities. Place beans in a pot, cover with water and soak overnight.

When ready to cook, drain beans and set aside.

Sauté onion, green pepper, celery, garlic and jalapeño in oil in a large stock pot over medium-high heat, uncovered, until soft (about 10 minutes).

Add beans to the pot, along with chicken broth, red wine, water, bay leaf, ham hocks, cayenne pepper and black pepper. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and taste to adjust seasoning.

Simmer, covered, for 2 hours, stirring frequently.
Remove ham hocks after 2 hours. Continue to simmer beans for another 30 minutes, or until the liquid in the beans has a thick, creamy consistency.

As soon as the ham hocks are cool enough to work with, remove all meat from the bones, and shred it. Return meat to the beans.

Divide the hot rice among 4 wide, shallow serving bowls. Pour 1 1/2 cups of the bean mixture over the rice in each bowl; you’ll have a little bean mixture left over.

Garnish with scallions and serve immediately.

You can also replace the red beans with a firm, creamy bean like Midnight Black Bean.

If you wish to add andouille, tasso or chicken to this recipe, to make it meatier still . . . go right ahead!

Red Beans and Rice

1 lb. Rancho Gordo Sangre de Toro Beans
2 tbs. cooking oil (we like grapeseed or vegetable)
1 large onion, diced
1 bell pepper, diced
1 large carrot, grated
2 ribs celery, diced
5 large garlic cloves, diced
3 tsp. smoked paprika
1 smoked ham hock or 3/4 lb. smoked ham, diced (optional)
2 dried bay leaves
3 tsp. fresh thyme leaves
A few dashes Worcestershire sauce
Balsamic vinegar, to taste (we used about two big dashes)
A few dashes of Hot sauce (optional)
Salt, to taste (if you can, get Smoked Sea Salt — adds a nice smoky flavor)

Cooked white rice for serving

Pickled onions, for garnish (optional)

Fresh chives and parsley, chopped for garnish

You can soak the beans overnight if you’d like OR, for day-of: cover the beans with water in a big pot and bring to a rolling boil. Boil the beans for about an hour, until the beans are tender but not falling apart. Sometimes it takes longer, depending on the age of the beans. Do NOT add salt yet (this slows the cooking process).

When the beans are nearly tender, pour your cooking oil into a pan and sauté the onions, celery, bell pepper, and carrot until fragrant (about 2-3 mins). Add the garlic and smoked paprika, then sauté for another few minutes, stirring occasionally.

Drain the beans, then add the sautéed vegetables to the beans. Add the ham hock (if using), thyme, bay leaves, Worcestershire, balsamic, hot sauce, and just enough water (or veggie stock) to cover.

Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to a low simmer.

Stirring occasionally, cook for at least 2 hours, or until it’s nice and creamy. The longer you cook it, the better it gets!

Do one final salt check — add a bit more if it needs it.
Pour mixture over cooked white rice and top with pickled onions (if using) and fresh chopped herbs. Serve with good local bread and a glass (or three) of Cabernet Sauvignon.

Citing Two Old Dogs.

Pasta e Fagioli (Pasta Fazool)

1/4 pound diced Apple Smoked Bacon (optional) (we like Hobbs)
1 tablespoon good quality olive oil, (3-4 tablespoons if not using bacon)
1/2 cup finely diced sweet onion
1/4 cup finely diced celery
1/4 cup finely diced carrot
2 garlic cloves finely chopped
3/4 cup diced Roma tomatoes or canned crushed tomatoes with juice
1/2 pound Royal Corona or Cassoulet beans, soaked 6-8 hours
4 cups homemade chicken stock or your favorite canned chicken stock
6-8 cups water if necessary
1/2 teaspoon Mexican Oregano or 1 tablespoon fresh oregano chopped
1 cup pasta (your choice shape such as little tubes or broken papardelli noodles
1 tablespoon fresh Italian parsley chopped
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Da Vero Lemon Olive Oil to drizzle
Vella Dry Jack to grate to taste over the “fazool”

In a large heavy bottom soup pot, sauté bacon until browned. Remove bacon from pot with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Discard all but about 1-2 tablespoons bacon fat and add 1 tablespoon olive oil (or start with 3-4 tablespoons of olive oil if you are not using bacon).

Over medium heat, sauté onions, celery, carrots, and garlic until soft and onions are translucent, about 10 minutes.

Add tomatoes, beans, stock, oregano, and return bacon to the pot. Simmer over medium heat until beans are tender, about 1 hour (cooking time may vary depending on freshness of beans). You may add water if necessary.

Add pasta and continue cooking until al dente. Remove from heat, stir in the parsley and allow the “fazool” to stand for 10 minutes before serving, to concentrate the flavors. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

To serve: Drizzle individual bowls with lemon olive oil, and sprinkle grated cheese on top.

Pasta e Fagioli with Escarole

2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
3/4 cup tomato sauce (you can use your favorite)
1 cup cooked Rancho Gordo Alubia Blanca beans, or another creamy white bean
1 cup stock (Try chicken stock and bean broth, half and half)
1 sprig fresh rosemary
1/2 pound short, flat pasta (I broke up tagliatelle nests)
1 head escarole, chopped into bite-sized pieces
Salt and pepper to taste
Serves 3 or 4 as a light main dish

In a large skillet, warm the oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and saute until soft, 8–10 minutes. Add the tomato sauce, beans, stock, and rosemary sprig and stir. Lower the heat to medium-low and cook gently for another 10–15 minutes to combine the flavors.

Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to package directions, using plenty of salted water. Drain the pasta.

Remove the rosemary sprig from the sauce, then mix in the drained pasta; add the escarole and toss gently. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve.

Classic Pasta Fagioli

Serves 4-6

1 lb Baia Pasta Organic Durum Wheat Sardinians (Or try Whole Durum Wheat or Spelt pasta from Baia)
1 1/2 cup of cooked Rancho Gordo Cranberry beans
1 1/2 cup of cooked Rancho Gordo Royal Corona beans
4 cups bean broth from the cooked beans (If you have less than four cups, make up the difference with chicken broth)
4 oz pancetta, cubed or roughly chopped
1 tbs of lard (or 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil)
1 medium onion, chopped fine
1 celery rib, chopped fine
1 carrot, minced
1 garlic clove, minced
1 rosemary sprig
1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
1 tbs tomato paste
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt & pepper to taste (optional)
Pecorino or Parmesan cheese, grated, for serving

As you prepare the beans, make sure you have plenty of liquid on hand when they are done as this will be the basis for your sauce.

While the beans are cooking, prepare the soffritto. Melt the lard (or olive oil) in a medium-sized pan over medium heat. Slowly fry the pancetta until fragrant and chewy. Once cooked, remove the pancetta with a slotted spoon and let rest on a paper towel. If needed, add more olive oil so there is enough fat to fry the aromatic vegetables.

Add the carrot, celery, garlic and onion until the vegetables are soft and the onion is turning golden colored.

Add the tomato paste and pepper flakes and cook for a few minutes until the paste is heated through and the tomato flavor is intensified.

Add the bean broth and rosemary sprig and adjust the salt and pepper to taste. Continue cooking on a gentle simmer for 15 minutes or so. The liquid should start to reduce.

Cook the pasta in a large stockpot in salted water for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Drain.

Add the drained pasta, beans, and reserved pancetta to the soffritto mixture, mix well and gently cook for a few minutes to marry the various flavors.

Serve immediately with a splash of peppery extra virgin olive oil. Pass around a bowl of grated pecorino or Parmesan cheese for the guests to help themselves.

Pork, Pork, Pork, and Beans

Serves 6-8

1 pound Rancho Gordo Yellow Eye Beans
1 1/2 to 2 pounds bone-in Pork Butt (Shoulder)
5 slices Uncured Rustic Bacon, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch strips (lardons)
4 links Rustic Pork Sausage, cut on the diagonal into 1-inch pieces
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Mirepoix:

1 large yellow onion, coarsely chopped
2 large stalks of celery, coarsely chopped
1 small carrot, coarsely chopped
6 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
1 fennel bulb, coarsely chopped
14 ounce can diced tomatoes with the juice
1/2 cup dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc
5 branches fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
2 tablespoons lemon juice

Beans:

3 tablespoons olive oil
Sea salt, preferably Rancho Gordo Sal de Mar sea salt (from the Yucatan)
2 cups panko crumbs
8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Seasoning the pork butt: Remove the bone from the pork butt and cut the meat into 1 1/2-to-2 inch chunks. Season all sides of the meat with salt and pepper, and refrigerate it (uncovered) for a day.

Soaking the beans: Put the beans in a bowl and cover with 2-inches cold water. Soak the beans for 4 to 6 hours.

Begin the cooking: Put the bacon into a cold 5 quart enamel cast iron or other heavyweight Dutch oven and place the pan over medium heat. Cook the bacon from for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring from time to time, until the fat has rendered and the bacon is just beginning to color. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a bowl and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Mix the mirepoix vegetables together and reserve 1/2 cup for cooking the beans. Add the remaining vegetables to the pan and sauté in the bacon fat, stirring from time to time for about 10 minutes until the vegetables have softened and are just beginning to color.

Stir in the tomatoes and their juice. Add the wine, thyme and bay leaf. Tuck the pork chunks into the vegetables, leaving the top half of the meat exposed and put (uncovered) in the oven to cook for about 2 hours.

Cooking the beans (while the meat is in the oven):
Heat a medium size enamel cast iron or other heavyweight Dutch oven. Add the oil and the reserved mirepoix and saute about 10 minutes to soften.

Add the beans and their soaking water, adding additional water to reach 2-inches above the beans. Place over medium-high heat, cover and bring to a rolling boil. Continue to boil rapidly for 10 minutes, adjusting the heat as necessary.

Place the lid slightly ajar (to allow evaporation), and reduce the heat to cook the beans at a gentle simmer for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Add additional water as needed to be sure the beans are covered by 2 inches of water at all times; use the lid to control the heat.

After about 1 hour, the smell of beans should be pronounced and you can salt the beans at this point. Add 11/2 tablespoons of salt. Continue to cook until the beans are just tender.

Completing the dish: Once the pork is tender, remove the pieces from the pan. Remove the thyme and bay leaf and discard.

Put the cooked vegetables and any juices into a food processor. Add the smoked paprika, 2 teaspoons salt, a few grinds of black pepper and lemon juice and puree.

Drain the beans and put them in the Dutch oven. Stir in the bacon pieces and the vegetable puree.

Nestle the pork meat and sausages into the beans, leaving the top half of the meat exposed and return to the oven (uncovered) to cook for 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, put the panko crumbs in a bowl and stir in the butter. Remove the pot from the oven and sprinkle the panko over the top. Return to the oven for another 20 minutes or until the crumbs are a rich golden brown.

White Beans, Wild Rice, and Tomatoes

Ingredients:

1 large heirloom tomato, cubed
2 tablespoons fruity extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Rancho Gordo Pineapple Vinegar to taste
1 cup cooked Rancho Gordo Wild Rice
1/2 cup cooked white beans, such as Rancho Gordo Cassoulet or Alubia Blanca beans
Chopped fresh parsley for garnish

Serves 1–easy to scale up

In a bowl, combine the tomato, olive oil, salt and pepper, and vinegar. Let stand for at least 30 minutes.

To make the salad, toss the wild rice with a generous drizzle of olive oil. Make a ring around a bowl with the rice, then add the macerated tomatoes and finally the cooked beans. Sprinkle with parsley and maybe indulge yourself with one small drizzle of olive oil.

White Beans with Salsa Verde

Cooked Royal Coronas, Alubia Blanca, or Cassoulet beans

To make Italian salsa verde:

Pound a clove of garlic with some salt and make a paste.

Add chopped fresh sage and flat-leaf parsley (about 3 parts sage to one part parsley) and continue pounding as you add really good olive oil.

Pancetta, Corn, and Beans

1 tablespoon olive oil
3 ounces pancetta, cubed
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 yellow onion, chopped fine
4 ears of corn, kernels removed
1 tablespoon Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio
2 cups cooked Rancho Gordo Cassoulet or Marcella beans
2 cups water (or half water and half bean broth)
Salt and pepper to taste
Optional: 2 to 3 tablespoons heavy cream
Minced fresh flat-leaf parsley or cilantro for garnish

In a soup pot, warm the olive oil over medium-low heat. Add the pancetta cubes and saute over medium-low heat until tender and chewy, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent them from burning.

Add the garlic and onion and saute until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the corn, oregano, beans, and water, stirring to mix all of the ingredients. Raise the heat to medium and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender and the flavors have blended, about 20 minutes.

Season with salt and pepper. Right before serving, you can add some heavy cream if you like. Allow the soup to cook another 2 or 3 minutes to reheat if necessary. Serve in bowls, garnished with fresh herbs.

Gigante Beans in Creamy Tomato Sauce

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 yellow onion, chopped
1 carrot, peeled and finely chopped
1 rib celery, finely chopped
1 teaspoon salt
28-ounce can whole peeled Roma tomatoes, with tomatoes roughly chopped, liquid reserved
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable stock
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup heavy cream
2 to 4 cups cooked Rancho Gordo Royal Corona beans
Fresh flat-leaf parsley for garnish, chopped
Extra-virgin olive oil

Serves 2 to 4

In a large skillet over medium high heat, saute the garlic, onion, carrot and celery in the olive oil until soft, 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Salt. Add the tomatoes and their liquid and cook for another 10 minutes. Stir in the stock and wine. Add the cream and gently cook another 5 minutes. Check for seasoning and add more salt if necessary.

Divide the beans among bowls and top with the sauce. Sprinkle parsley over the top and finish with a drizzle of olive oil.

Yellow Indian Woman Bean Bowl with Pickled Shallots and Goat Cheese

For this meal, the Yellow Indian Woman beans met with the shallots and a few crumbles of goat cheese. As the whole mess settles and melts you get what is almost a sauce and the beans have never been happier.

Thinly sliced shallots
Sea salt
Rancho Gordo Banana Vinegar or Pineapple Vinegar
Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio
Yellow Indian Woman beans, cooked in the Rancho Gordo Manner
Crumbled goat cheese

To make the pickled shallots: Place sliced shallots in a bowl and add enough vinegar to cover completely. Add a pinch of salt and a sprinkle of Oregano Indio (crush with your hand). Let rest about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Scoop warm beans and broth into a bowl and top with a spoonful of pickled shallots and a crumble of goat cheese.

Achiote Chicken Posole with Chorizo

2 Organic Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast halves, cut into 2-inch-thick strips
2 oz. Achiote Paste
3 tbls. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
6 oz Housemade Mexican-style chorizo (recipe below) (Note: you can substitute 1 link of store-bought all natural lean chorizo, but be careful with salt as store bought tends to be over salted and spiced)
1 1/2 cups cooked Rancho Gordo White Posole (prepared hominy)
3/4 cup chicken stock infused with the juice of 1/2 a lime
3/4 lb. spinach leaves
1/2 cup chopped poblano peppers
1/4 cup sliced leeks
1/4 cup sliced shallots
1/8 cup sliced garlic
1 cup avocado salsa (recipe below)
Salt and pepper

Avocado Salsa

2 avocados
3 Tbls chopped cilantro
3 Tbls chopped shallot
Juice of 1/2 lime
Salt and pepper
Cut the avocado into cubes, add cilantro and shallot, pour in lime juice and mix together. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Housemade Mexican-Style Chorizo

Start with ground all-natural pork butt and mix in dashes of the following: minced dried onion, paprika, chili powder, cumin seed, coriander seed, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne pepper, black pepper and sea salt.

For the chicken:

Mix the achiote paste and 2 tbls. olive oil in a boil, add the chicken and coat the pieces with the paste.

In a heated pan over medium high heat, add the chorizo and cook about 4 minutes. Remove from pan and cover with foil to keep warm.

In same pan, cook chicken breast pieces, being careful to leave space so you get a good sear. Cook about 4 minutes on each side. A nice dark crust will form.

Remove from pan and cover with foil to keep warm.
In same pan, add one tbls olive oil, sauté poblano pepper, leeks, shallots and garlic for about 2 minutes (season with salt and pepper).

Add posole and stock and bring stock to a boil.

Add spinach in bunches to wilt, about 3-4 minutes.

Place posole, pepper and spinach mixture on plate. Place chicken pieces on top. Top with avocado salsa and sprinkle crumbled chorizo over top.

Bean and Vegetable Posole

1 cup dried Rancho Gordo White Posole (prepared hominy)
1 cup dried heirlooms beans such as Pinto, Eye of the Goat, Lila, or Moro
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1½ tsp. New Mexican Red Chile Powder
1½ tsp whole cumin seeds
3/4 tsp. Mexican Oregano
1 T. olive or vegetable oil
1 cup chopped tomatoes
3 small calabacitas (small squash) or zucchini, sliced ¼” thick
4 oz. fresh or frozen green beans
1 T. vegetable bouillon
2 T. chopped cilantro
Salt, to taste

Rinse and soak posole and beans, in separate bowls, for about 6 hours.

Drain posole and discard water. Add posole to a pot, fill pot with fresh water, and place over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and cook until tender, about 2 hours. Drain.

Meanwhile, pour beans and their soaking liquid into another pot and add more water if needed to cover beans by about 2 inches. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a low simmer. Cook until tender, adding water as necessary (timing will vary depending on type of bean).

In 4 qt. pan, saute onion, garlic, chile powder, cumin seed and oregano in 1 T. oil for 7 minutes until onion is soft.

Add squash and tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Stir in cooked beans and cooking liquid, posole, green beans and bouillon. Simmer 30 minutes, adding water if stew is too thick.

Add cilantro and salt to taste.

Serve with warm tortillas.

Posole with Pork and Chipotle

2 cups Rancho Gordo White Posole (prepared hominy)
1 pound pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion diced
2 large cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 1/2 teaspoons dried Mexican Oregano
2 large bay leaves
1 pork bone (optional)
2 cups crushed tomatoes in tomato puree
1 to 2 chipotles in adobo, membranes and seeds removed, finely minced, plus 1/2 teaspoon adobo sauce
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro for garnish (optional)
Whole trimmed radishes, for serving (optional)

Soak the hominy overnight in 12 cups (3 quarts) of water. Drain, reserving liquid.

Season the pork well with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a heavy 4-quart pot over high heat. Brown the pork well in three to four batches (making sure not to crowd the pot), 2 to 3 minutes on each side. As you finish each batch, transfer it to a platter and set aside.

Reduce the heat to medium high. If there is fat in the pan, spoon off all but 1 tablespoon. Add the onion and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste and cook, stirring constantly for an additional minute.

Stir in 8 cups (2 quarts) of the hominy soaking liquid, the soaked hominy, oregano, bay leaves and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Add the pork bone (if using).

Over high heat, bring the mixture almost to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 1 hour.

Stir in the tomatoes, chipotle and adobo sauce, and the browned pork, along with any juices accumulated on the platter. Set the cover slightly off center and continue simmering until the pork is fork-tender and the hominy is done (it will be chewy but the center should be soft and somewhat creamy), an additional 45 minutes to 1 1/2 hours. Skim off any fat that rises to the surface. Add more hominy soaking liquid or water if the mixture becomes too thick and threatens to stick to the bottom of the pot.

Remove the pork bone and bay leaves. Adjust the seasoning. Serve in large bowls. Garnish individual bowls with cilantro and serve a bowl of radishes for accompaniment.

Summer Posole

1 pound dried Rancho Gordo White Corn Posole (prepared hominy)
1 large white onion, finely diced?
3 cloves garlic, minced?
1 1/2 teaspoons Mexican Oregano?
6 large New Mexico green chiles (or poblanos)?
1 bunch scallion, finely chopped?
1 cup cilantro, finely chopped?
1 teaspoon cumin seed, toasted and ground?
1 pinch sea salt?
1/4 cup olive oil?
1 whole avocado, diced into chunks?
4 whole corn tortillas, slivered?
1 cup cabbage, thinly sliced?
1 lime, quartered

Put the posole in a large soup pot with onion, garlic, oregano and a gallon of water. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer until tender. This can take as long as 3 hours, so check pot occasionally and add water as it boils away. The posole will swell considerably, and the kernels will split open.

While the posole is cooking, roast the chiles, then place them in a bowl and cover with a plate to steam for 15 minutes. Slip off the skins, pull out the seeds and chop. Add the chopped chiles to the simmering posole along with 4 teaspoons salt. Continue cooking until the posole is completely tender. Taste for salt.

Preheat the oven to 350F. To make the salsa, combine the scallions, cilantro, chiles, cumin and salt in a bowl. Stir in the oil, add water as needed to thin, and add avocado. Toast the tortilla strips in the oven until crisp, or fry them in vegetable oil.

To serve, stir the salsa into the posole and garnish with a nest of cabbage and tortilla strips and a wedge of lime. Accompany with warm tortillas.

Posole Rojo

1 tablespoon olive oil
2 medium white onions, chopped fine
8 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 cup tomato paste
3 tablespoons Rancho Gordo New Mexican Red Chile Powder
1 tablespoon Rancho Gordo Mexican Oregano
3 1/2 cups chicken broth
4 cups cooked Rancho Gordo White Corn Posole/Prepared Hominy (see note below)
7 cups (approx) shredded, poached chicken (about 2 pounds)
Salt and pepper

Garnishes: Any combination you choose of diced avocado, chopped cilantro, finely chopped white or red onions, chile powder, crumbled queso fresco, thinly sliced radishes, and lime wedges

Serves 8

Heat oil in 5-quart pot over medium heat. Add onions and garlic and cook until soft. Add tomato paste, chile powder, and oregano, stirring until all ingredients are warmed through and well mixed.

Add 4 cups water, broth, and posole. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a low simmer for about half an hour.

Add chicken, stir and then add salt and pepper to taste. Serve in individual bowls and allow your guests to garnish as desired.

To cook dried posole: Sort and rinse your posole. Soak from 6 to 10 hours in cold water. Strain. In a large pot, add the soaked posole (about 2 cups), 3 quarts of water, and a roughly chopped onion. Bring to a hard boil for about 5 minutes, then reduce heat to a gentle simmer for about 4 hours. The posole will flower, like popcorn, when it’s finished. Strain and use in any recipe calling for cooked posole. You can freeze extra drained, cooked posole.

Posole Blanco

For the broth:

1 whole chicken, cut into parts, including the back
1 yellow or white onion, sliced
4–6 garlic cloves, cut in half (skins on is fine)
3 bay leaves
3 stalks celery, roughly chopped
1 small carrot, peeled and roughly chopped
1 teaspoon Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 stick Rancho Gordo Canela/Soft Cinnamon
3 cloves
3 whole allspice
3 whole peppercorns
Salt

For the hominy:

1 pound Rancho Gordo Posole/Prepared Hominy, soaked for 6–10 hours
3 slices of white or yellow onion

For the Chile Manzano Salsa:

4 Manzano chiles, seeded and finely sliced
1 small red onion, peeled and finely sliced
1 tablespoon Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio
1/4 cup Rancho Gordo Pineapple Vinegar
1 teaspoon salt

For serving:

Chile Manzano salsa
Thinly sliced radishes
Shredded lettuce
Quartered limes (optional)
Fresh cilantro leaves (optional)
White onion, finely chopped (optional)
Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio or Mexican Oregano (optional)
Rancho Gordo New Mexican Red Chile Powder (optional)

Add the chicken to a large stockpot and add 2–3 quarts of water. Turn the heat to high. Once the water starts to boil, reduce to medium-low to maintain a gentle simmer. After about 5 minutes, check for scum on top of the water and remove with a small sieve or slotted spoon. Add the rest of the broth ingredients and continue simmering until the individual chicken pieces are cooked through. Remove the breasts after about 20 minutes; thighs, drumsticks and wings will take about 40 minutes.

Allow the chicken pieces to cool. Remove any remaining skin and shred the meat with your hands. Strain the broth and reserve. You should have one bowl of shredded chicken and one large amount of broth.

While the chicken cooks, in a large stockpot, combine the hominy, onion and 3 quarts of water and bring to a full boil over high heat; boil for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer gently until the corn kernels are tender, 2–3 hours. Once the hominy is cooked, strain it, reserving both the corn and the liquid.

For the salsa, in a serving bowl, combine all of the ingredients and toss well. Check for seasoning and add salt to taste. Let rest while the chicken and hominy cook.

When all the preparations are done, add the cooked hominy and shredded chicken to your pot. Add a total of 2 quarts plus 1 cup of liquid from the chicken broth and the hominy water (1 quart plus 1 cup of chicken broth added to 1 quart of hominy water is a good suggestion but some people prefer all chicken or all hominy).

Cover the pot and bring to a gentle simmer over medium-high heat. Once warmed through, serve in individual bowls and allow guests to dress up their bowls with radishes, lettuce and the Chile Manzano Salsa, along with whatever else you choose.

Posole Verde

Serves 6

1/2 pound Rancho Gordo White Posole (prepared hominy)
1 1/2 onions, white or red, peeled and halved
Salt
4 garlic cloves, peeled
15 to 20 tomatillos, paper skins removed
2 poblano chiles
1 serrano chile
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 cup coarsely chopped cilantro
2 teaspoons Rancho Gordo Mexican Oregano
1 1/2 quarts vegetable or chicken broth
Freshly ground black pepper

Soak posole overnight in water to cover generously. Drain.
Place it in a saucepan with fresh water to cover generously.

Add 1/2 onion, bring to a simmer, cover partially and cook at a gentle simmer until the corn kernels are tender, 2 to 3 hours; many will split open. Season with salt and cool in the liquid.

On a hot, dry griddle or skillet, roast the remaining halved onions, garlic, tomatillos and chiles, turning occasionally, until they are charred and slightly softened, 15 to 20 minutes. Work in batches if necessary.

Put the roasted poblano chiles in a paper bag to steam until cool.

Transfer the other vegetables to a bowl and let cool, collecting their juices.

Skin the poblanos, discarding seeds and stems. Discard the serrano chile stem but don’t skin or seed.

Put all the roasted vegetables in a blender, in batches if necessary, and puree until smooth.

Heat the oil in a large stockpot over moderate heat.
Add the vegetable puree and adjust heat to maintain a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes to blend the flavors.

In the blender, puree the cilantro, oregano and 1 cup of the broth. Add to the vegetable mixture along with 4 cups additional broth.

Drain the posole and add it to the pot. Season with salt and pepper and return to a simmer. Thin with additional broth if necessary. Serve in warm bowls.