Chicken Udon Soup

2 cups low sodium chicken broth
2 cups dashi stock (can also substitute more chicken stock)
5 slices ginger
1 tablespoon soy sauce (plus 1 teaspoon, divided)
2 tablespoons oil (plus 1 teaspoon, divided)
3 cloves garlic (smashed)
2 boneless skinless chicken thighs (cut into bite-sized pieces)
salt and pepper
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon mirin
8 oz. fresh or frozen udon noodles (frozen preferred; 225g)
1 scallion (julienned)

Add the chicken broth, dashi stock, ginger, and 1 tablespoon soy sauce to a large saucepan or pot and bring to a simmer. Cover and continue simmering while you prepare the rest of the dish. Heat the oil in a wok or skillet over medium heat, and add the garlic. Allow the smashed garlic cloves to crisp up in the oil for about 2 minutes.

Season the chicken with salt and pepper, and add 1 teaspoon oil and 1 teaspoon cornstarch. Mix until combined. Add the chicken to the pan in one layer and turn up the heat to medium high. Don’t move the chicken. Allow to sear until it’s browned on one side, and then stir. During this process, move the garlic on top of the chicken so that it doesn’t burn.

Stir in the mirin and 1 teaspoon soy sauce and cook for another minute.

Cook the udon according to package directions and distribute between two soup bowls. Taste the stock and check for seasoning. Too salty? Add water. Not seasoned enough? Add salt. Pour the hot stock over the noodles, and top with the chicken. Garnish with scallions.

Coconut Katsu Chicken

2 boneless chicken breasts pounded to 1/2 inch thickness
1/4 cup flour
2 eggs beaten
2 cups coconut panko
Oil for frying

Put flour, eggs, and panko in three separate bowls.

Coat each chicken breast with flour, then egg, then panko.

Deep fry in 350 degree oil until golden and internal temperature is at least 165.

Sheet Pan Roasted Miso Tofu and Carrot Bowl (with Chicken Variation)

4 large carrots- peeled or scrubbed ( or sub sweet potato, yam, parsnips or other veggies)
8 ounces tofu – extra firm ( or add salmon or chicken breast…see notes)
salt and pepper and optional chili flakes to taste
Garnish- Orange zest ( optional) toasted sesame seeds, nuts, ¼ cup cilantro or scallions
Marinade:

2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons miso paste ( any color)
1 tablespoon fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
2 tablespoon honey or maple

Preheat oven to 425F

Make the marinade, blending all ingredients in a blender until smooth.

Slice carrots at an angle into ? -½ inch disks, then half-moons.

Blot tofu with paper towels and slice into ¾- 1 inch slices, blot again.

Line a sheet pan with parchment.

Place carrots in single layer on the sheet pan, and beside them add the tofu.

Season the tofu (or salmon chicken) with salt and pepper – and if you like, add chili flakes.
Spoon or brush on the honey–miso marinade generously over the tofu and drizzle an remaining over the carrots. If carrots seem dry, drizzle with a little more oil. Give a quick toss, spread out, and place in the oven for 30 minutes.

Divide carrots among two bowls, top with tofu. Garnish with fresh orange zest ( optional) , toasted sesame seeds and some fresh cilantro ( or scallions).

notes

If using salmon, it will cook much faster than the carrots. Depending on how thick, it may only need 10-15 in the oven, so either take it out early, or put it in later. Chicken breast ( boneless) will cook relatively the same amount of time as carrots ( give or take) but always check as thicker or larger breasts will obviously take longer, and smaller may take less time.

Noodle Bowl with Seared Ahi and Ponzu (with Tofu Variation)

4 ounces dry soba noodles ( or rice, rice noodles, GF noodles, or cooked zucchini noodles)
6 ounces ahi tuna or tofu ( see notes)
1–2 tablespoons coconut or high temp cooking oil
2 radishes ( watermelon radishes are pretty)
1 Turkish cucumber, sliced ( or carrot, shredded)
1/2 avocado, sliced
garnish- scallions, chives, chive blossoms
handful sprouts- sunflower or daikon are nice
other options: grated veggies like carrots, cabbage, kohlrabi, beets, snow or snap peas, edamame, fresh peas, daikon, baby spinach or greens.
Sesame crust

2 teaspoons sesame seeds
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon granulated onion or garlic
1/4 teaspoon sugar ( optional, helps caramelize)
1/4 teaspoon chili flakes

Ponzu Dressing:

1/4 cup orange juice ( juice from 1/2 an orange)
1/8 cup soy sauce or GF Liquid Aminos or coconut aminos. ( Smoked shoyu is nice too)
1/4 cup mirin ( or sub a mix of 2 teaspoons honey and 3 tablespoons water)
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
1/8 cup toasted sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon hondashi granules ( optional- adds a nice smoky depth, but not vegan)
pinch salt and pepper

Cook noodles according to directions, drain and set aside.

While noodles are cooking, pat dry tuna. Mix the Sesame Crust ingredients together on a small plate and coat all sides of tuna, pressing it firmly into the flesh. See notes for tofu.

Make the dressing, set aside.

Heat the oil in a cast iron skillet until smoking hot. You want the pan to be very hot- in order to create the golden crust, without cooking the ahi all the way through. Sear all sides of the tuna for 45-60 seconds on each side, or until the crust is golden. Remove from heat and place on paper towel. Let stand 5 minutes. With a sharp chefs knife, slice across grain into 6-8 thin pieces. The goal is to have the inside nice and rare and but the outside seared and crispy. The secret is the very hot pan.

Divide the noodles among two bowls. Divide the ahi, cucumber, radishes, avocado and sprouts among the two bowls. Sprinkle veggies and noodles with a little salt. Top with scallions or chives or chive blossoms.

Spoon a generous amount of Ponzu dressing over top and serve ( you most likely won’t need all the dressing)

notes

If keeping this vegan, serve it up with Sesame Ginger Baked Tofu or simple pan-seared tofu, seasoned with salt and pepper.

Pressure Cooker Teriyaki Chicken

Teriyaki Sauce:

1/2 cup low sodium soy sauce or Braggs Liquid Aminos
1/4 cup rice vinegar
1/4 cup honey or maple syrup
2 tablespoons sesame oil
2 garlic cloves, minced or use a garlic press
1 tablespoon ginger, minced
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes, more or less to taste
1 1/2 lbs chicken thighs (boneless, skinless)- left whole for shredding, or cut into 1-inch cubes.

1/4 cup cold water
3 tablespoons cornstarch
Optional additions: quick cooking veggies- broccolini, asparagus, snow peas, green beans, bell pepper, etc.

Garnish: scallions, sesame seeds, chives, cashews, etc.

Serve with: rice, black rice, in tortillas with Asian Slaw (see related recipe) in a Pineapple

Place Teriyaki Sauce ingredients in the Instant Pot: Soy Sauce (or Braggs), rice vinegar, honey, sesame oil, garlic, ginger and red pepper flakes.

Place chicken thighs in the pot (either cubed or whole).

Close and seal the instant pot, set to HIGH pressure for 10 minutes. ( 9 minutes if cubed).
Let pressure release naturally for 5 minutes, then vent. If shredding, remove chicken and shred the using two forks and place back into the pot. If cubed, leave chicken in the pot. Set the instant pot to SAUTE. Add veggies if you like and saute until tender, about 3-5 minutes.

In a small bowl, mix ¼ cup of water with 3 tablespoons of cornstarch and when veggies are tender, whisk into the simmering sauce. Stir until smooth and thickened, about 1 to 2 minutes.

Serve over rice, or in tortillas with Asian Slaw, garnish with sesame seeds and scallions.

Make the Teriyaki Sauce and set aside.

Make the cornstarch slurry and set aside i a separate bowl.

In a wok or large skillet, heat 1-2 tablespoons high heat oil and sear cubed chicken on all sides over medium heat, until nice and golden and slightly crispy. Take your time here.
Pour the teriyaki sauce over the browned chicken and lower heat letting the chicken cook all the way through.

Once the chicken is cooked through, stir in the cornstarch slurry. Stir until thickened and turn off heat.

Leftovers will keep 3-4 days in the fridge. This recipe can easily be doubled in a 6 quart instant pot.

1-2-3 Miso Dressing

1 part white miso (shiro miso)
1 part honey
1 part apple cider vinegar

Combine all ingredients in a bowl, stir with a fork or whisk until smooth, and adjust to taste. This will keep in the fridge for quite awhile—check the expiration date on the miso as a guideline.

If you’re serving the dressing with something super salty, bump up the honey. With something super rich, bump up the vinegar.

This dressing would be happy to spruce up any vegetable, whether it’s crunchy romaine, massaged kale, sautéed spinach, or quick-blanched peas. You could also spoon it on top of a grain bowl. Or make a cold noodle salad. Or drizzle it onto pan-seared chicken, fish, beef, or tofu. All of which to say, it’s hard to go wrong

Tempeh Rice Lettuce Wraps with Garlic and Lime

2 garlic cloves, peeled
1- inch segment of fresh ginger, peeled
1/2 cup almond, cashew, or coconut milk
scant 1/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
8 ounces plain tempeh, crumbled
1 1/2 cups / 6 ounces leftover rice
1 teaspoon soy sauce or shoyu
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
1 small cucumber, deseeded, and cut into 1/4-inch dice
1 small carrot, peeled and grated
a handful of sliced herbs, cilantro, basil, mint
10 – 12 whole lettuce leaves, romaine, little gems, etc.
to serve (all optional):
extra lime, serrano vinegar*, shallot oil, a favorite curry paste

Use a mortar and pestle to smash the garlic and ginger into a paste. Heat 1/4 cup of the nut milk in a medium sauce pan over medium heat, stir in the ginger-garlic paste along with the salt, and barely simmer for a minute of two before adding the tempeh. Stir until well-coated, cover, and allow to cook for about five minutes, stirring once or twice along the way. Add the rice, stir, and allow it to heat.
In the mean time add the soy sauce, and lime juice to the remaining nut milk, stir well, and add to the saucepan as well. Transfer to a serving bowl, and stir in the cucumber. Top with the grated carrot, and herbs, and give a light final toss.

To serve, spoon a generous amount of the rice mixture into a lettuce leaf. If you want to make them extra special do any/all of the following. Spread a whisper thin layer of curry paste across the lettuce, top with the rice mixture, and finish with a spoonful of serrano chile vi

Roasted Fish (or Scallops, Chicken, or Tofu) with Miso Rice and Ginger Scallion Sauce

1/4 cup white or sweet miso
1 1/2 cups basmati or other long-grain rice
4 (6-ounce) skin-on fish fillets (or other protein; see note)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and black pepper
1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1/4 cup chopped scallions, plus more for garnish
1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar or unseasoned rice vinegar
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
4 cups finely shredded cabbage, such as green, Napa or savoy (about 8 ounces)
Roasted sesame oil, for serving

Heat oven to 425 degrees. In a medium saucepan, whisk miso with 2 1/4 cups water until dissolved. Stir in rice and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and cook until all of the liquid is absorbed and rice is tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes. Fluff rice with a fork (it will be a little sticky).

On a rimmed baking sheet, rub salmon all over with olive oil, season with salt and pepper and arrange skin-side up. Roast until fish is just opaque and cooked to medium, 8 to 10 minutes.

In a small bowl, combine soy sauce, scallions, vinegar and ginger, and season with salt and pepper.

Divide miso rice and cabbage among bowls. Top with salmon, ginger-scallion vinaigrette and sesame oil.
Notes:
The rice complements other seafood, too, like cod, shrimp and scallops. It’s also a great accompaniment to grilled steak and roasted chicken. And if it’s a satisfying plant-based meal you’re after, miso rice is a natural match for delicious tofu-vegetable bowls. Use the versatile ginger-scallion vinaigrette as the sauce.

Shredded cabbage brings freshness and crunch to the finished dish, but use whatever crispy vegetable you have on hand: shredded brussels sprouts, carrots, snap peas, radishes and iceberg lettuce are all great options.

Some readers suggest waiting until almost the end of the cooking time for the rice to add a watered down miso mixture. Miso is full of great enzymes that are good for digestion that can be destroyed when boiled.

Japanese Cheesecake

8 oz Philadelphia cream cheese (225 g)
2 oz unsalted butter (50 g)
100 ml full milk
2 oz. cake flour (60 g)
1 oz. corn starch (20 g)
6 egg yolks, room temperature
1/2 tablespoon lemon juice
Scant 1/4 teaspoon salt
6 egg whites, room temperature
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
5 oz fine granulated sugar (140 g)

Preheat oven to at 325 F (160 C). Prepare and measure all the ingredients and set out on your working area. I used a 9-inch springform pan. Grease the entire pan and line the bottom part with parchment paper. Please refer to notes if you use other pan.

On a stove top, melt cream cheese, butter and full milk on low heat. Use a whisk to mix well until the cream cheese melts completely without lumps. Remove from heat.

Sift the cake flour and corn starch.

Add egg yolks, lemon juice and salt to the cream cheese mixture. Whisk to combine well. Add the cake flour and corn starch, whisk until a smooth batter forms and there is no lump.

Make the meringue by whisking egg whites, sugar and cream of tartar until light, foamy and soft peaks form. You can beat with a stand mixer or electronic hand mixer. I used speed 4 and beat for 1-2 minutes or until soft peaks form. DO NOT over beat.

Add the cream cheese mixture gently into the meringue, FOLD GENTLY until well incorporated.

Pour the mixture into the springform pan. Tap the cake pan gently before baking.

Bake the cake using hot water bath. Place the cake pan in a larger pan and add 1 inch of hot water in the larger pan. Bake at the bottom shelf of the oven for 1 hour 10 minutes.

Leave the Japanese cheesecake to cool down in the oven with the oven door open, about 30 minutes. This will prevent sudden change of temperature that may cause the cake to shrink. However, it’s normal that the cake will shrink about 1/2 – 1 inch after cooling.

Refrigerate the cake (with or without the cake tin) for at least 4 hours or overnight. Top the cake with powdered sugar before serving.

NOTES
1. If you use a springform pan or loose base cake tin, make sure it’s closed tight. It’s best to wrap the base of your pan with 2 layers of aluminium foil (outside of the pan) to prevent the water bath from seeping inside the bottom part of the cake.

If you use a 8″ round pan, it is very important to line the sides of the 8″ pan with parchment paper, make sure the parchment paper extends higher than the cake tin by about 1.5″.

If you use a 9″ pan, you can line the bottom part and not the sides. You may line the entire pan with parchment paper, if you like.

You can also use an 8-inch or 9-inch square pan.

If the cake shrinks too much, the main reason is over mixing the egg white mixture with the cream cheese mixture. Beat the egg whites until soft peaks form, FOLD VERY GENTLY using a flipping motion. Do not stir or blend vigorously.

Make sure you have a smooth cream cheese mixture that is not lumpy.
Use room temperature eggs to ensure that the meringue has the maximum volume.
Make sure your egg whites are beaten until soft peaks form. Dot not over beat, we don’t want stiff peaks.

DO NOT OVER MIX the meringue with the cream cheese batter. Fold very gently, do not stir or blend as the bubbles in the meringue will disappear.

To avoid the sudden drop in oven temperature and room temperature, leave the cake in the oven with the oven door open. This will make sure that the cake doesn’t lose volume and sink.

To avoid cracking at the top, please make sure you use a water bath for baking. The steam from the water will circulate in the oven, hence minimizing cracking at the top.

To avoid over browning, bake the cake at the bottom part of your oven.

Vegetable Yakisoba

2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons ponzu sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce (or vegetarian oyster sauce)
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce (vegan Worcestershire if making vegetarian)
2 tablespoons oil
1 small onion (peeled and thinly sliced)
1 medium carrot (julienned)
1 cup green cabbage (julienned)
1/2 red bell pepper (julienned)
1 pound fresh yakisoba noodles (450g)
3 scallions (julienned)
toasted sesame seeds (optional garnish)

In a small bowl, mix together the mirin, Ponzu sauce, oyster sauce, and Worcestershire sauce until thoroughly combined.

Add 2 tablespoons of oil to the wok. Stir-fry for 2 minutes and then add the onions, carrots, cabbage, and bell pepper.

Stir-fry for another 2 minutes, and then add the noodles. Pour the sauce mixture over the noodles. The liquid will help break them up.

Continue to stir-fry the mixture for another 2-3 minutes until the noodles are heated through. Add the scallions and stir-fry for 1 more minute. Serve, garnished with black sesame seeds if desired.

Chicken Yakisoba

1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon mirin
1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
8 oz. sliced chicken thighs or breast (225g)
2 teaspoons cornstarch
3 tablespoons oil (plus 2 teaspoons, divided)
1 small onion (thinly sliced)
1 medium carrot (julienned)
2 cups cabbage (julienned)
12 oz. fresh yakisoba noodles (340g)
2 scallions (julienned)

In a small bowl, mix together the soy sauce, oyster sauce, mirin, Worcestershire sauce, and sugar until thoroughly combined. In a separate bowl, combine the sliced chicken with 2 teaspoons cornstarch and 2 teaspoons oil. Set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a wok over high heat. Add the chicken in one layer and allow to sear for 1 minute. Stir-fry for another minute, remove from the wok, and set aside.

Add 2 tablespoons of oil to the wok, along with the shiitake mushrooms. Stir-fry for 2 minutes and then add the onions, carrots, and cabbage. Stir-fry for another 2 minutes, and then add the noodles, seared chicken, scallions, and the sauce mixture. Continue to stir-fry the mixture for another 2-3 minutes until the noodles are heated through.

Yaki Udon

1 pound frozen udon noodles (450g, or 200g dry udon noodles)
2 tablespoons butter (30g)
1 clove garlic (minced)
2 teaspoons dashi powder
1 tablespoon oil
4 ounces pork shoulder (115g, julienned; can substitute chicken, beef, seafood, pressed tofu, or more vegetables)2 tablespoons mirin
2 cups cabbage (shredded)
1 medium carrot (julienned)
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon water
2 scallions (julienned)

Start by bringing a large pot of water to a boil. Add the udon noodles. Boil for 30 seconds – 1 minute to loosen them. If using dried noodles, cook according to package instructions. Drain, rinse in cold water to remove excess starch, and drain thoroughly again. Set aside.

Place a large Dutch oven, non-stick pot, or large cast iron skillet over medium heat. When the pan is heated, add the butter. Once partially melted, stir in the garlic and dashi granules. Cook for 30 seconds, until the dashi partially dissolves. At this point, the butter should be a light brown color.

Add the drained noodles and toss to coat them in the butter. Cook for 5 minutes over medium heat, until the noodles have dried out and are slightly crisped. Remove and set aside.

Add a tablespoon of oil to the pot, along with the pork shoulder. Brown the pork until crisp on the edges. Add mirin, and cook until caramelized.

Add the cabbage, carrot, pepper, soy sauce, and water. Stir-fry until the vegetables are wilted, and add the noodles back in, along with the scallions. Stir-fry for ano

Quick Pickled Turnips

1 bunch hakurei turnips (approximately six, see note)
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
3 thin slices of ginger

Wash turnips well and slice them thinly on a mandolin. Place turnip slices in a small bowl and toss with the salt. Let rest until there is a pool of liquid on the bottom of the bowl, about 30 minutes. Drain turnips of the salty water and pack into a pint sized mason jar.

Add vinegar, sugar, pepper and ginger slices. Apply a watertight lid and shake to combine. Place pickled turnips in the fridge and chill before eating. Pickles can be eaten within an hour of being made and will keep for at least a week.

Alternative recipe:

Japanese Quick Pickled Turnips

Ingredients

5-6 small – medium turnips (9 – 10 oz.)
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tbsp mirin (sweet rice wine)
1 whole dried red chile
1 small piece of ginger – julienne
1 zipper bag

Wash turnips well especially inside of the leaves. Cut off the leaves about one inch from the top of the turnips. Peel and slice turnips into about 3mm thick. Cut the leaves into 4cm(1.5inch) long.

Put sliced turnips, a handfull of leaves and salt into a zipper bag and squeeze them to coat salt into all the turnips. Massage them for a few more minutes until the turnips soften.

Add the rest of the ingredients and massage them again. Seal the zipper bag and refrigerate at least 1 hour up to 6 hours.

Drain all the liquid and serve them in a small bowl. You can put some soy sauce on top when you eat.

Pickled Japanese Turnips

2 lb. Hakurei Turnips, cleaned and greens trimmed
3 cups Water
3 cups rice vinegar
1 1/2 Tablespoons pickling salt
6 Tablespoons sugar or 3/4 cup mirin – sweet rice wine
3-inch piece of ginger peeled and sliced thin

Heat a pot of boiling water enough to blanch the turnips. Combine the water, sugar or mirin, vinegar and salt and bring to a boil. Blanch the turnips for 30 seconds in the boiling water and remove.

Have hot jars ready. Add a few slices of ginger to them. Pack with the turnips just out of the boiling water. Pour over the pickling solution. Follow the canning directions below. The turnips should have a little crunch left in them after they are opened.

Can the jars in a hot water bath or keep in the refrigerator for up to a month.

Momofuku Turnip Pickle

1 pound turnips, peeled and sliced paper thin
2 (4-inch-by-2-1/2-inch) pieces kombu
1 cup rice vinegar
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup water
2 tablespoons kosher salt

Place the turnips and kombu in a 1-quart jar, leaving at least 1/2 inch of room at the top of the jar.

Make the brine: Place the vinegar, sugar, water, and salt in a small saucepan, whisk to dissolve the sugar and salt, and bring to a rapid simmer.

Immediately pour the brine over the turnips, making sure to cover them completely but leaving 1/4 inch of room at the top of the jar. Let cool to room temperature, about 1 hour.

Cover the jar with a tightfitting lid. Shake the jar or turn it upside down to evenly distribute the brine, then place it in the refrigerator for at least 1 day and preferably 1 week before using. (The pickled turnips can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 2 months.)

Japanese Spicy Pickled Daikon (with Korean, Chinese, and Indian Variations)

1 pound daikon radish
15ml (1 tbsp) table salt
125ml (1/2 cup) sugar
125ml (1/2 cup) apple cider vinegar
125ml (1/2 cup) water
30ml (2 tbsp) sea salt
2 red chillies, washed and finely sliced
60ml (4 tbsp) dill, washed and chopped
Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired.

Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.

Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and chillies in a saucepan and bring to a boil.

Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

Squeeze the excess moisture out of the radish.

Layer the vegetable along with sprinklings of dill in a sterilised, airtight storage container.

Pour in the pickling liquid, ensuring all surfaces of the radish are covered.

Wait for at least 2 days, but preferably 1 month, for the flavours to develop.

Variations:

Korean Pickled Daikon
You can easily turn this pickled dikon recipe into a kimchi-style recipe. All you need to make this a kimchi pickled daikon recipe is the chilli paste kimchi is made with. This includes the Sunchang Gochujang hot pepper paste. Just mix as much hot pepper paste as you see fit.

Chinese Pickled Daikon
You can easily make a Chinese-style pickled daikon. Simply add the following traditional Chinese ingredients and spices below, such as:

star anise
cloves
cassia or Chinese cinnamon
sesame seed oil
fennel seeds

You can also consider these additional ingredients:

cabbage
Korean radish
carrots
scallions
zucchini
gingergarlic
turmeric

Pickled Mooli
You can also make this an Indian-style recipe. Just add some turmeric powder or these turmeric substitutes. Next add ginger, curry powder, garam masala mix and fresh chillies or chilli paste. This way you can incorporate as much Indian flavour as possible.

Takuan (Japanese Pickled Daikon)

1 daikon radish
15ml (1 tbsp) salt
125ml (1/2 cup) sugar
125ml (1/2 cup) rice wine vinegar
5ml (1 tsp) ground turmeric
125ml (1/2 cup) water

Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired.

Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.

Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and turmeric in a saucepan and bring to a boil.

Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

Squeeze the excess moisture out of the radish and place the vegetable in a sterilised, airtight storage container.

Pour in the pickling liquid, ensure all surfaces of the radish are covered.

Wait for at least 2 days, but preferably 1 month, for the flavours to develop.

Japanese-Style Tuna Noodle Salad

FOR THE SALAD:
8 ounces dried udon noodles
1 to 2 tablespoons furikake or sesame seeds
10 to 12 ounces tuna in oil, drained
2 scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced

FOR THE DRESSING:
2 tablespoons sesame oil
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon mirin
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sweet miso

Cook the noodles according to the package instructions.

Meanwhile, prepare the dressing: In a measuring cup or bowl, whisk to combine the sesame oil, canola oil, rice wine vinegar, mirin, soy sauce and miso; set aside.

In a small skillet, lightly toast the sesame seeds, if using, over medium-low heat until fragrant; set aside.

Drain the cooked noodles in the colander, then transfer to a wide, shallow serving bowl. Add the wakame and about 3/4 of the dressing, and toss to coat. Divide the noodles among 4 bowls. Top each portion with tuna, drizzle with the remaining dressing, then sprinkle with the scallions and furikake or sesame seeds. Serve hot, cold or anywhere in between.

Miso Roasted Eggplant

Small japanese eggplants
Neutral flavored oil
White miso
Sesame oil
Rice wine
Soy sauce
Black pepper
Sesame seeds

Grab some small eggplants — the Japanese variety is a good option — and cut them on the bias into little steaks.

Drizzle them with neutral oil and roast in a 400-degree oven for 20 minutes or so, turning them once or twice, until they’re soft.

Then crank the oven to broil, and paint them with white miso that’s been cut with splashes of sesame oil and rice wine, a smaller splash of soy and a few grinds of black pepper.

Let that get going until the skin begins to pop, then serve those little vegetarian flavor steaks over rice, with a spray of sesame seeds over the top.

Quick Dressings for Vegetables, Salads, Meat, or Fish: Other Asian

Simple Chinese Sauce:
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup rice vinegar
1 tablespoon Chinese chile garlic sauce
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Perfect Chinese Sauce:
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon hot water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon chili oilh
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

Supreme Soy:
2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon vegetable or canola oil
1 teaspoon oyster sauce

Simple Soy:
1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1/2 cup no-salt-added vegetable broth
1 tablespoon honey or agave nectar
1 teaspoon vinegar
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced

3-2-1 Sauce:
3 Tbsp soy sauce
2 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 Tbsp sesame oil

Ginger Scallion:
one bunch scallions
one knob fresh ginger, about 2 1/2 ounces
2 tablespoons neutral-flavored vegetable oil
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sherry vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Scallion Ginger:
1 tablespoon peeled and minced ginger
1/2 cup neutral oil, like canola or grape seed
1/4 cup trimmed scallions, white and green parts combined, chopped into 1/4-inch pieces
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons good soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Odd Flavor Sauce:
3 T soy sauce
2 T tahini or almond or peanut butter
1 T Chinkiang vinegar (preferable!) or red-wine vinegar
1 T sesame oil
2 t sugar
1/4 t kosher salt
Heat through and add:
3 T neutral oil
1 small scallion, finely chopped (about 1 T)
1 T minced fresh ginger
1 large garlic clove, finely chopped (about 1 t)
1/2 t chili flakes (or more to taste)
1/2 t crushed Sichuan peppercorns

Sesame Ginger:
Grated zest of 1 lemon
Fresh ginger, cut into a 1-inch cube, peeled, and grated
1 tablespoon honey
3/4 teaspoon cayenne
3/4 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/4 cup unseasoned brown-rice vinegar
1/3 cup shoyu sauce (wheat-free soy sauce)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

Sesame Ginger Vinaigrette:
1 garlic clove, finely minced or pureed
1 teaspoon finely minced ginger
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon brown sugar or agave nectar
5 tablespoons canola oil or light sesame oil
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

Ponzu Ginger:
8 tablespoons ponzu sauce
4 tablespoons thinly sliced scallions
4 teaspoons grated fresh peeled ginger
4 teaspoons mirin
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Tonkatsu:
1 Tbsp. ketchup
2 1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce (or Usutah So-su)
1 1/2 tsp. oyster sauce
1 1/8 tsp. sugar

Japanese Carrot Ginger:
1 carrot (65 grams), roughly chopped
1/2 small onion (35 grams)
1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger, to taste
1/4 cup rice vinegar (unseasoned)
2 tablespoons neutral vegetable oil
1 tablespoon (scant) sugar
2 teaspoons white or yellow miso
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
Salt, to taste

Miso Carrot Ginger:
1/4 cup peanut or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn
1/4 cup rice vinegar
3 tablespoons white miso, sold at Asian markets and specialty stores
1 tablespoon dark sesame oil
2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into big pieces
1 inch-long piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into coins
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Carrot Ginger Coconut:
1/3 cup full-fat coconut milk
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric, or more to taste
5 tablespoons peeled ginger, chopped to measure
3 medium carrots, scrubbed
1/2 of a serrano pepper, stemmed, or to taste
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon miso (optional)
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/4 cup / 60 ml brown rice vinegar
4 medium shallots, peeled (or less if your shallots are strong

Miso Citrus:
2 teaspoons miso paste
Juice of one lime or lemon, or half an orange

Rhubarb Ginger Tahini:
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1-2 tablespoons (or more;) Brooklyn Delhi Rhubarb Ginger Achaar
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
1/3 cup soy sauce or tamari
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons pure sesame oil
1 tablespoon tahini paste

Spiced Yogurt:
1/4 tsp coriander seeds, toasted and ground
1/4 tsp cumin seeds, toasted and ground
1 cup Greek-style yogurt
2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 tsp white wine vinegar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Kosher salt
3 Tbsp water, or as needed

Tamarind:
2 teaspoons tamarind concentrate
1/2 teaspoon fresh lime juice
3 teaspoons dark brown sugar or jaggery crushed
1/4 teaspoon toasted coriander powder, freshly ground (see notes above)
100mL cup water
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Date Tamarind:
(Boil, then puree)
2 cups water
1 cup soft pitted dates
1/4 cup tamarind
1/4 cup jaggery sugar
salt, to taste