Ideas for Egg Lunches: Carrot-Ginger Dressing

1/3 cup full-fat coconut milk
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric, or more to taste
5 tablespoons peeled ginger, chopped to measure
3 medium carrots, scrubbed
1/2 of a serrano pepper, stemmed, or to taste
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon miso (optional)
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/4 cup / 60 ml brown rice vinegar
4 medium shallots, peeled (or less if your shallots are strong)

Puree the coconut milk, turmeric, ginger, carrots, pepper, olive oil, salt, toasted sesame oil, miso, maple syrup, brown rice vinegar, and shallots in a blender until very smooth. Taste, and adjust, if needed, with more salt or vinegar, or any other ingredient you think might need a little boost.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Miso Sambal

(Adapted for hard boiled eggs)

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
4 tablespoons chili sauce, such as sambal
2 tablespoons red or white miso paste

In a small skillet, heat the vegetable oil over high heat. Add the garlic and chili sauce to the hot oil, and cook until combined and fragrant, 30 seconds. Add the miso and mix together for another minute.

Remove the skillet from the heat and pour the spicy miso mixture over the edamame. Toss to coat, and serve immediately.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Sesame Oil and Sambal Oelek

(Adapted for hard boiled eggs)

1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons sambal olek
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
3 scallions

Treat your soba noodles as you would any pasta. Cook the noodles in a pot of salted, boiling water until tender, about five minutes. Strain noodles and transfer to medium-large bowl. Drizzle in about one tablespoon of sesame oil until you notice that the noodles give off an oily sheen from being well-coated. Pop that bowl in the refrigerator and forget about it until the noodles have chilled out.

While those soba noodles are chilling, combine about 1 tablespoon of ginger and 1 tablespoon of garlic in a small to medium-sized bowl. Add Indonesian hot sauce sambal oelek to that (about 1½ tablespoons) along with around two tablespoons soy sauce, two tablespoons mirin, two tablespoons lime juice, two tablespoons sesame oil, one tablespoon sesame seeds, and the sliced crunchy white-green bottoms of two or three scallions (save the green parts for the next step). Whisk to combine.

Remove the chilled soba noodles from the refrigerator and add half of the freshly whisked sauce and toss. Add the other half, along with the sliced green-only tops of two to three scallions. Make sure the noodles are generously coated in the spicy-sweet-salty-nutty dressing, and serve with sesame seeds and a sprinkle of whatever remaining scallion slices you have left.

Miso-Glazed Japanese Eggplant

4 Japanese eggplants, halved lengthwise
1 T neutral oil
1/4 C red miso
2 T mirin
+ sesame seeds

Heat the oven to 450°F. (Lazy power move: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper to make cleanup supereasy.)
 
Slick the eggplants all over with oil and arrange them cut-side up on the baking sheet. Roast for 10 minutes—they should be barely wilted, a very light roast.

Meanwhile, whisk together the miso and mirin in a small bowl.
 
Smear the cut side of the eggplants with the miso mixture and roast until the eggplants are tender and the miso is browned and bubbling, 10 minutes longer. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve.

This is one of those center-of-the-plate types of vegetable preparations that can easily supplant meat. (Serve it with short-grain rice and any of the pickles in this book, or with store-bought kimchi.) The eggplants take on a super-rich caramelly umami flavor. It’s a standard Japanese response to the part of the summer when there’s more eggplant around than anyone knows what to do with, and it works very well on a grill—just put the eggplants over a low-to-medium fire, so the miso doesn’t burn too fast and the flesh of the eggplant has time to cook all the way through.

Cold Sesame Soba Noodles

1 package soba noodles
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons sambal olek
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons lime juice
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
3 scallions

Treat your soba noodles as you would any pasta. Cook the noodles in a pot of salted, boiling water until tender, about five minutes. Strain noodles and transfer to medium-large bowl. Drizzle in about one tablespoon of sesame oil until you notice that the noodles give off an oily sheen from being well-coated. Pop that bowl in the refrigerator and forget about it until the noodles have chilled out.

While those soba noodles are chilling, combine about 1 tablespoon of ginger and 1 tablespoon of garlic in a small to medium-sized bowl. Add Indonesian hot sauce sambal oelek to that (about 1½ tablespoons) along with around two tablespoons soy sauce, two tablespoons mirin, two tablespoons lime juice, two tablespoons sesame oil, one tablespoon sesame seeds, and the sliced crunchy white-green bottoms of two or three scallions (save the green parts for the next step). Whisk to combine.

Remove the chilled soba noodles from the refrigerator and add half of the freshly whisked sauce and toss. Add the other half, along with the sliced green-only tops of two to three scallions. Make sure the noodles are generously coated in the spicy-sweet-salty-nutty dressing, and serve with sesame seeds and a sprinkle of whatever remaining scallion slices you have left.

Japanese Pickled Cucumbers with Seaweed

2 English hothouse or 8 Persian cucumbers, sliced crosswise 1/4″ thick
1 tbsp kosher salt
1/3 cup Pacific Arame seaweed
3 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
1 tbsp agave syrup (nectar)
1 tsp Shaoxing or other rice wine or sake
2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

Toss cucumbers and salt in a medium bowl; let stand 10 minutes. Drain, rinse under cold water, then squeeze well to remove as much excess moisture as possible.

Meanwhile, place seaweed in a small bowl and add warm water to cover. Let soak until softened, about 5 minutes; drain and squeeze out excess moisture.

Whisk vinegar, agave, and wine in a medium bowl. Add cucumbers, seaweed, and sesame seeds and toss to coat.

DO AHEAD: Cucumbers can be salted and rinsed 5 days ahead. Cover and chill.

Edamame with Miso Sambal

1 pound frozen edamame in their pods
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
4 tablespoons chili sauce, such as sambal
2 tablespoons red or white miso paste

Prepare the edamame according to the package instructions, or until just steamed through. Transfer the cooked edamame to a serving bowl.
In a small skillet, heat the vegetable oil over high heat. Add the garlic and chili sauce to the hot oil, and cook until combined and fragrant, 30 seconds. Add the miso and mix together for another minute.

Remove the skillet from the heat and pour the spicy miso mixture over the edamame. Toss to coat, and serve immediately.

Ramen Salad with Steak

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons tahini
1 1/2 easpoons sugar
1 teaspoon finely grated peeled ginger
1 garlic clove, finely grated
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
8 ounces dried ramen noodles (flavor packet discarded)
Kosher salt
12 ounces thinly sliced cooked boneless steak (such as New York strip steak)
1 small kohlrabi, peeled, cut into matchsticks
3 scallions, thinly sliced
2 cups thinly sliced Napa cabbage
1 cup cilantro leaves with tender stems
1/4 cup crushed salted, roasted cashews
1 tablespoon crushed Sichuan peppercorns

Whisk lemon juice, soy sauce, tahini, sugar, ginger, and garlic in a small bowl to combine. Gradually add vegetable oil followed by sesame oil, whisking constantly until emulsified; set aside.

Cook noodles in a large saucepan of boiling salted water according to package instructions until al dente. Drain; rinse under cold water, then drain again.

Toss noodles, steak, kohlrabi, scallions, cabbage, and cilantro in a large bowl with three-quarters of reserved dressing to combine and evenly coat; season with salt. Top with cashews and Sichuan peppercorns and drizzle remaining dressing over.
Do Ahead: Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Wasabi Flank Steak with Miso-Glazed Potatoes

2 tablespoons wasabi powder
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons drained horseradish
1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce
One 2-pound flank steak
4 teaspoons canola oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 pound fingerling potatoes
1 tablespoon miso
1 tablespoon mirin
1 bunch watercress, stemmed

Preheat the oven to 450 and preheat a cast-iron grill pan. In a bowl, combine the wasabi and water. Stir in the horseradish and soy sauce. Rub the steak with 1 teaspoon of the oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill the steak over high heat until lightly charred, 5 minutes. Flip the steak and spread the wasabi over the charred side.

Transfer the pan to the oven and roast the steak for 10 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 135° for medium-rare; transfer to a cutting board and let rest for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan of boiling water, cook the potatoes for 15 minutes. Drain and let cool, then peel. Wipe out the saucepan. Add the remaining oil and the potatoes and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until golden, 5 minutes. Combine the miso and mirin; add to the potatoes and cook, stirring, until glazed, about 2 minutes.

Thinly slice the steak across the grain and serve with the potatoes and watercress.

Katsudon

2 center-cut, boneless pork chops, pounded down to a centimeter thick
salt and pepper
flour, for dusting
1 egg
1 cup panko
oil, for frying
½ cup dashi stock or chicken stock
2 teaspoons sugar
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons Mirin
2 large eggs
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
2 servings steamed white rice
1 scallion, chopped

Season the pounded pork chops with salt and pepper, and dust with a light, even coating of flour. In one shallow bowl, beat the egg. Put the panko into another shallow bowl.

Add thin, even layer of oil to a cast iron pan or skillet over medium heat. The oil is ready when you throw a panko breadcrumb into the oil and it sizzles. Dip the pork into the egg to coat. Transfer the pork to the panko and press it evenly into the meat to get a good coating.

Carefully lay the pork chops in the hot oil and cook for 5-6 minutes on one side, until golden brown. Flip and cook the other side for another 5-6 minutes. Drain on a plate lined with a paper towel.

While the pork is resting, add the stock, sugar, soy sauce, and Mirin to a small bowl. In another bowl, lightly beat 2 eggs. Add a tablespoon of oil to a pan over medium heat, and add the sliced onion. Fry the onions until they’re translucent and slightly caramelized.

Pour the stock mixture over the onions. Slice your tonkatsu into pieces and place on top of the onions. Drizzle the egg over everything. Cook over medium low heat until the egg is just set. Serve over bowls of steamed rice, and garnish with scallions.

Oyakodon (Chicken and Egg Rice Bowls)

2/3 cup dashi stock
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon mirin
1 teaspoon sugar
1 pound chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
2 large eggs, beaten
Steamed medium grain rice
1 scallion, chopped

In a non-stick frying pan or cast iron skillet over medium high heat, add the dashi stock, soy sauce, mirin, and sugar. Bring to a boil.

Add the chicken, and simmer in the stock for 10 minutes. Spread the sliced onion over the chicken and cook for 2 minutes.
Pour the beaten egg over the top, and simmer, covered for 2-3 minutes, until cooked but slightly runny.
Serve over freshly steamed rice and garnish with chopped scallions.

Katsudon

1/3 cup (80ml) dashi, or 1/3 cup (80ml) water mixed with 3/4 teaspoon Hondashi
1 tablespoon (15ml) soy sauce
1 tablespoon (15ml) sake
2 teaspoons (8g) sugar
2 teaspoons (10ml) mirin
4 ounces thinly sliced yellow onion (115g; about 1/2 medium onion), optional
1 leftover Japanese fried chicken or pork cutlet, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips
2 large eggs
2 scallions, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced, plus more for garnish
Steamed white or brown rice, for serving

Combine dashi, soy sauce, sake, sugar, and mirin in a small saucepan or donburi pan and bring to a simmer over medium heat.

If using onion, add to broth and simmer until tender, about 5 minutes.

Add sliced fried cutlet and let simmer for 1 minute.

Meanwhile, beat together eggs and scallions in a small bowl.

Pour egg mixture on top of cutlet and around broth. Cover and cook until eggs are as set as you’d like them, about 1 minute for very soft or 2 minutes for medium.

Slide broth, egg, and chicken out on top of a bowl of rice. Sprinkle with scallions and serve.

Tonkatsu or Chicken Katsu

2 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, about 8 ounces (225g) each or 4 boneless pork sirloin cutlets, 4 to 5 ounces (110 to 140g) each
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour (about 5 ounces; 140g)
3 large eggs, thoroughly beaten
1 1/2 cups Japanese-style panko bread crumbs (about 5 ounces; 140g)
Vegetable, canola, or peanut oil, for frying

To Serve:
Finely shredded green cabbage
Lemon wedges
Steamed white rice
Japanese-style pickles (sunomono), optional
Homemade or store-bought tonkatsu sauce

If Using Chicken Breasts: Cut each breast half into 2 cutlets. Place them, one at a time, in a heavy-duty zipper-lock bag and pound gently to 1/4-inch thickness, using a meat pounder or the bottom of a heavy 8-inch skillet. (See this guide for step-by-step directions.) Season generously with salt and pepper. For best results, let them rest in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours and up to overnight after seasoning. Proceed to step 3.

If Using Thighs or Pork Cutlets: Place thighs or cutlets, one at a time, in a heavy-duty zipper-lock bag and pound gently to 1/4-inch thickness, using a meat pounder or the bottom of a heavy 8-inch skillet. Season generously with salt and pepper. Proceed immediately to step 3.

Fill 3 wide, shallow bowls or high-rimmed plates with flour, beaten eggs, and panko, respectively. Working with one thigh or cutlet at a time, dredge in flour with your first hand, shaking off excess. Transfer to egg dish, then turn thigh or cutlet with your second hand to coat both sides. Lift and allow excess egg to drain off, then transfer to bread crumb mixture. With your first hand, scoop bread crumbs on top of thigh or cutlet, then gently press, turning to ensure a good layer of crumbs on both sides. Transfer thigh or cutlet to a clean plate and repeat with remaining meat. If this is done properly, your first hand should touch only dry ingredients, while your second hand should touch only wet, making the process less messy.

Fill a large cast iron or stainless steel skillet with 1/3 inch oil. (To speed things up even more, use 2 skillets simultaneously.) Heat over high heat until shimmering and just shy of smoking, about 350°F (175°C) on an instant-read thermometer.

Using tongs or your fingers, gently lower cutlets into hot fat, laying them down away from you to prevent hot fat from splashing toward you. (Work in batches if necessary.) Fry, gently swirling pan and rotating cutlets for even browning, and adjusting heat as necessary for a steady, vigorous bubble (around 300 to 325°F; 150 to 160°C), until bottom side is set, about 1 1/2 minutes. Flip cutlets and fry until other side is set, about 1 1/2 minutes longer. Continue cooking, swirling frequently and flipping occasionally, until well browned on both sides, about 3 minutes longer. Transfer to paper towels to drain and season with salt right away. Repeat with remaining cutlets.

Slice katsu into thin strips and serve immediately with shredded cabbage, lemon wedges, white rice, Japanese pickles (if desired), and tonkatsu sauce.

Carrot – Ginger Dressing

1 carrot (65 grams), roughly chopped
1/2 small onion (35 grams)
1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger, to taste
1/4 cup rice vinegar (unseasoned)
2 tablespoons neutral vegetable oil
1 tablespoon (scant) sugar
2 teaspoons white or yellow miso
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

Salt, to taste Add all ingredients to the bowl of a food processor and process until mostly smooth and uniform. Serve over lettuce or use as a dip for crudités. Store extras in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Shiso Pesto

2 ounces green shiso leaves (japanese perilla)
1 ounces Grated pecorino romano
1 teaspoon Kosher salt (halve if using regular salt)
1/2 cup Olive oil
1 tablespoon
Lime juice (from 1/2 a lime)
8 ounces
Linguine (cooked according to package directions) handful
Pine nuts or coco nibs, toasted 1 ounce
Uni (optional)

Put the shiso, cheese, salt, olive oil, and lime juice, in a blender or the work-bowl of a food processor and whirl it around until it’s a fine green puree.

Boil the pasta according to the package directions in generously salted water. When the pasta is done, strain it well and toss it in a bowl adding the pesto a bit at a time until it reaches your desired level of flavor.

Plate the pasta and top with toasted pine nuts or coco nibs.

You can also add some uni or ikura on top for some extra color and brine.
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Miso – Tahini Avocado Toast

black sesame gomasio ingredients

1/4 cup black sesame seeds
1/8 teaspoon large grain sea salt
toast ingredients

Toast
1/4 cup tahini paste
1 tablespoon mellow white miso
1 small garlic clove, minced
1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
3-4 tablespoons water
splash of tamari (optional)
1 ripe avocado, pitted and cut into 4 segments
4 slices of toast, toasted
1-2 tablespoons black sesame gomasio
2 scallions, trimmed and sliced thin
fresh chopped dill, to top (optional)

In a heavy skillet over a low flame, toast sesame seeds until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. set aside and let cool. place salt and cooled seeds in a mortar and pestle, grind until sandy. set aside until ready to use.

In a small mixing bowl, whisk tahini, miso, lemon juice, and garlic; while whisking add water 1 tablespoon at a time until thick and creamy (slightly thicker than a traditional tahini sauce). cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to use.

Take the avocado segments and slice each segment into thin slices. spread a generous amount of miso-tahini onto each piece of toast; top with sliced avocado and sprinkle with gomasio, sliced scallions, and chopped dill (if using).

Perfect Soy-Grilled Steak

1/4 cup soy sauce
1 teaspoon peeled and minced ginger
1/2 teaspoon peeled and minced garlic
1 tablespoon honey, molasses or hoisin sauce
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Juice of 1/2 lime
1 16- to 24-ounce boneless steak (rib-eye, skirt or strip), or one 24- to 32-ounce bone-in steak (rib-eye or T-bone)

Start a charcoal or wood fire or heat a gas grill; the fire should be hot and the rack no more than 4 inches from the heat source. Mix together the first 6 ingredients; taste and add more of anything you like. Turn the steak in the sauce once or twice, then let sit in the sauce until the grill is hot.

Turn the steak one more time, then place on the grill; spoon any remaining sauce over it. For rare meat, grill about 3 minutes a side for steaks less than an inch thick. For larger or more done steak, increase the time slightly.

Carrot Ginger Dressing

1/3 cup full-fat coconut milk
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric, or more to taste
5 tablespoons peeled ginger, chopped to measure
3 medium carrots, scrubbed
1/2 of a serrano pepper, stemmed, or to taste
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon miso (optional)
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/4 cup / 60 ml brown rice vinegar
4 medium shallots, peeled (or less if your shallots are strong)

Puree the coconut milk, turmeric, ginger, carrots, pepper, olive oil, salt, toasted sesame oil, miso, maple syrup, brown rice vinegar, and shallots in a blender until very smooth. Taste, and adjust, if needed, with more salt or vinegar, or any other ingredient you think might need a little boost.

Makes about 2 cups

Tamago Kake Gohan (Japanese Style Rice with Egg)

1 cup cooked hot white rice (about 12 ounces cooked rice; 340g)
1 egg (plus 1 optional egg yolk)
Soy sauce
Kosher salt
MSG powder, such as Aji-no-moto or Accent (optional)
Mirin (optional)
Hondashi (optional)
Furikake (optional)
Thinly sliced or torn nori (optional)

Place rice in a bowl and make a shallow indentation in the center. Break the whole egg into the center. Season with 1/2 teaspoon soy sauce, a pinch of salt, a pinch of MSG, 1/2 teaspoon mirin (if using), and a pinch of Hondashi (if using). Stir vigorously with chopsticks to incorporate egg; it should become pale yellow, frothy, and fluffy in texture. Taste and adjust seasonings as necessary. Sprinkle with furikake and nori (if using), make a small indentation in the top, and add the other egg yolk (if using). Serve immediately.