Rojak Buah

2 to 3 cups of the following fruits: cucumber, jicama, pineapple, underripe mango and papaya, tart apples like Granny Smith, peeled and seeded where necessary and cut into bite-sized pieces

Optional add-ins: A handful of baby spinach or bean sprouts and pieces of fried firm tofu

SAUCE
2 to 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
Juice of 1 lime
2 teaspoon coconut sugar
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
1/2 cup toasted ground peanuts

In a large bowl, add hoisin sauce, lime juice, coconut sugar, chili powder, sesame seeds, and half of the ground peanuts. Mix well to combine into a sauce. Then add the fruits and toss to coat with the sauce. Sprinkle on the rest of the ground peanuts and serve.

Malaysian Tofu Salad with Peanut Sauce

PEANUT SAUCE
3 shallots, chopped
4 garlic cloves, chopped
1 lemongrass, white part only, chopped
3 to 5 dried chillis, soaked in warm water for a few minutes, chopped
1/2-inch galangal, peeled and chopped (optional)
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 cup peanuts, roasted and coarsely ground
1 tablespoon tamarind paste* or lime juice
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 cup coconut milk
1/2 cup water, and more as needed
2 to 3 tablespoons coconut sugar
1/2 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste

10 to 12 pieces fried tofu puffs*
2 cups carrots, shredded
2 cups cucumber, shredded
2 cups bean sprouts, blanched in hot water for a few minutes and drained
1/4 cup peanuts, roasted, for garnish

To make the sauce, start by making a spice paste. In a blender or food processor, add the shallots, garlic, lemongrass, dried chillis, galangal, ground coriander, ground cumin, and ground turmeric and blend until you get a smooth paste, scraping down the sides and adding a little water when necessary.

In a saucepan, heat up the oil over medium heat and stir-fry the spice paste for 3 to 5 minutes until fragrant. Add the ground peanuts, tamarind paste, dark soy sauce, coconut milk, and water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Season with sugar and salt to taste. Add more water if the sauce gets too thick. Remove from heat and transfer to a bowl.

To assemble the salad, in an individual serving plate, place 3 to 4 pieces of fried tofu puffs, 1/4 cup shredded carrots, 1/4 cup shredded cucumber, and 1/4 cup bean sprouts. (Use the amount suggested here as a guide and feel free to adjust as you please!) Top with the desired amount of peanut sauce and garnish with roasted whole peanuts to serve.

*NOTES:
· Prepare the store-bought deep-fried tofu puffs by briefly dipping them in hot water to remove excess oil and pat dry before toasting them in the oven until browned and crispy.
· Fried tofu can be substituted with extra firm or firm tofu cut into cubes either straight from the packet or lightly pan-fried or grilled.

Kopitiam Noodles (Kon Loh Mee)

These are “dry” noodles. Despite the emphasis on the word “dry” to set it apart from the soup version, the sauce in Kon Loh Mee plays an instrumental part to bind all the good flavors and textures of the different ingredients together.

The sauce is a simple mixture of shallot oil, light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and sesame oil. For one serving, start with:

—1/2 tablespoon shallot oil
—1/2 tablespoon light soy sauce
—1/2 teaspoon dark soy sauce
—1/4 teaspoon sesame oil

Combine the sauce in a bowl, toss the noodles in, taste, and adjust the seasoning according to your preference.

The next step is to pick your noodles. Thin rice noodles (mai fun), flat rice noodles (kuey teow), and yellow egg noodles are the common options at a typical Malaysian hawker stall. Depending on my mood, You can also combine two noodles together in one bowl.

The springy wonton noodles, which fall under the egg noodle category, are a popular choice and available either in thin or wide. Soba noodles, ramen noodles, and even spaghetti noodles are fine too. As a rule of thumb, 2-3 oz (55-85g) of noodles is a good portion for one serving.

Hawker-style Kon Loh Mee is often topped with Chinese barbecued pork, wonton dumplings, meatballs, shrimp or minced meat, just to give you some ideas. If you’re avoiding meat, tofu and tempeh make good toppings here.

There’s also always some kind of Asian leafy greens included, like choy sum, gai lan, or bok choy. The greens are usually just simply blanched. Here’s what you do: Bring a pot of water with a pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt, and a small glug of vegetable oil to a rolling boil. Then add the greens. You know they are ready as soon as the water returns to a rolling boil. Remove the greens, drain, and add them to your noodles.

Finally, serve your Kon Loh Mee with a side of chilies. In a pinch, a simple chili soy sauce dip will suffice but if you have the time, pickled green chilies are the way to go.

You can use either jalapeno or serrano for a bit more kick. In a nutshell, the chilies are sliced, deseeded, and pickled in a mixture of white vinegar, salt, and sugar until they turn a lighter shade of green, which takes about 1 to 2 hours, but it’s preferable if you can wait overnight as they get better with time. I have the step-by-step guide for you here.

Oh, and don’t forget to top your noodles with crispy fried shallots from the shallot oil!

Soy Sauce Noodles

3 serrano chilies, seeds removed and sliced into rounds
1/4 cup white vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup vegetable oil for frying
2 shallots, finely sliced

4-6 baby bok choy
A pinch of sugar
A pinch of salt
A small glug of shallot oil

1 tablespoon shallot oil
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
7 ounces dried wonton noodles, cooked according to package instructions and drained
Fried shallots, for garnish
Preparation

To make pickled green chillies: Blanch the chilies in hot water for about 10 seconds and drain. In a small bowl, combine the white vinegar, salt, and sugar, and stir to dissolve the sugar. Add the chilies and set aside to pickle for at least 1 hour.

To make shallot oil: In a skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and fry until the slices start to turn brown, stirring occasionally. Turn off the heat and let the shallots continue to fry until they turn a darker brown. Remove shallots from the oil and drain, saving the oil. Allow the oil and fried shallots to cool down.

Bring a pot of water to a rolling boil. Add the sugar, salt, and shallot oil. Add baby bok choy and bring the water back to a rolling boil. Remove the baby bok choy immediately and drain. Set aside.

In a mixing bowl, combine the shallot oil, light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and sesame oil. Add the cooked noodles and toss to mix well. Taste the noodles and add more soy sauce if you like the dish saltier.

Divide the noodles into two serving plates and garnish with the reserved fried shallots. Arrange 2 to 3 baby bok choy on the side of each plate. Serve immediately with pickled green chilies on the side.

Notes: While wonton noodles (both thin and wide) are typically used, you can also try it with rice noodles, soba noodles, and even spaghetti noodles.

Economy Noodles

12oz noodles of your choice
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon hoisin sauce

1 tablespoon vegetable oil
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 shallot, minced

2 cups bean sprouts
10 stalks spring onions, cut into 2-inch length

DIPPING SAUCE: A few chilis + enough soy sauce

To make the dipping sauce, cut some chilis and let them sit in enough soy sauce to cover. Feel free to remove the seeds beforehand. Here’s a video that quickly demonstrates how you can do that effectively, but if you really want less heat, you may have to slice them open length-wise and scrape off the pith and ribs together with the seeds. And if more heat is what you want, press the cut chilis onto the soy sauce with a fork. Let the chilis and soy sauce marinade while you cook.

Prepare your choice of noodles according to package instructions, making sure that they are not overdone because nobody wants soggy noodles in a stir-fry. You can do that while you prepare the other ingredients, or you can focus on one thing at a time and have everything you need on hand before you start.

The next thing to do is to mix the light soy sauce, dark soy sauce and hoisin sauce in a bowl. And once you’ve minced the garlic and shallot, and cut the vegetables, you’re ready to go.

Heat a wok or a deep frying pan in medium-high heat. You’ll know it’s warm enough when you see a little smoke rise up. Add oil, followed by garlic and shallots, and sauté until they are soft and the aromas are released but be careful not to burn them.

Add the noodles and sauce mixture and use a pair of chopsticks or tongs to quickly toss all the ingredients until the noodles are evenly coated. You can add a splash of water at anytime if things get too dry but not so much that you are boiling the ingredients.

Then make a well in the center and add bean sprouts. Give them a good toss to cook lightly on their own before mixing everything together. Add spring onions, give the noodles a final toss and turn off the heat. Serve immediately with the dipping sauce on the side.

Alison’s Edamame

1 bag frozen edamame

Sauce:
3 tablespoons chili paste
2 tablespoons soy sauce
Pinch of sugar to taste
Dash of black vinegar to taste
Dash of toasted sesame oil to taste

Steam or boil edamame until just done.

Mix sauce ingredients to taste.

Serve edamame with sauce on the side.

Singapore Chili Sauce

2 or 3 large red chiles, such as Fresno, cayenne, or long chile, coarsely chopped
2 or 3 hot Thai chiles, coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1-1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon hot chicken poaching broth

Put all of the ingredients into a small electric mini chopper and process to a semi-coarse sauce. Transfer to a dipping sauce dish.

Pad See Ew (Thai Beef and Noodles)

For the steak & marinade, you’ll need:

8 ounces flank steak, sliced into ?-inch thick slices
1 teaspoon Thai black soy sauce (Thai soy sauce is saltier than Chinese brands)
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch or tapioca starch
For the rest of the dish, you’ll need:

1 tablespoon oyster sauce
½ teaspoon sugar
2 teaspoons Thai soy sauce or regular soy sauce
1 tablespoon Thai black soy sauce
1 teaspoon fish sauce
Freshly ground white pepper, to taste
1 pound fresh wide rice noodles (you can also use dried rice noodles)
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 cloves garlic, sliced thinly
3 cups of Chinese broccoli, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 large eggs, slightly beaten

To the flank steak, add the Thai black soy sauce, vegetable oil, and cornstarch, and mix until the beef is completely coated. Set aside.

For the rest of the dish, combine the oyster sauce, sugar, Thai soy sauce, Thai black soy sauce, fish sauce, and white pepper in a small bowl. Stir to mix well.

Make sure your fresh rice noodles are at room temperature. If the noodles are really cold and stiff from refrigeration, rinse them quickly under hot tap water when you are ready to stir-fry the dish. This extra step will help you avoid a big homogenous lump of noodles during stir-frying. Be sure to shake off any excess water after rinsing and use them immediately.

The fresh wide rice noodles really set this dish apart from other noodle dishes, so try your best to find them. Or you can use our recipe for homemade rice noodles to make them at home.

If either of these options don’t work, then use dried rice noodles. If using a dried rice noodle, follow the directions on the package and make sure you undercook the noodles slightly (al dente), since you will be cooking them again in the wok. After you drain the noodles thoroughly, toss the noodles with a tablespoon of oil. This will prevent them from sticking to the wok.

Heat your wok over high heat until it just starts to smoke, and spread 1 tablespoon of oil around the perimeter of the wok evenly to coat. Sear the beef until it is 80% cooked through, and transfer back to the marinade bowl.

Add another tablespoon of oil to the wok and stir in the garlic. Immediately add the Chinese broccoli and stir-fry for 20 seconds (stir constantly to prevent the garlic from burning).

Next, spread the noodles around the wok. Continue to work quickly–your wok should be at the highest heat setting. Spread the sauce mixture over the top of the noodles, and gently mix everything with your wok spatula using a scooping motion for about 20 seconds. Add the beef back to wok.

Push the mixture to one side to let the empty side of the wok heat for 10 seconds. Add another tablespoon of oil to the wok, and add the beaten eggs. Wait 5 seconds for them to begin to cook. Scramble the eggs for another few seconds, breaking them up into smaller pieces.

If your wok is not sizzling at this point, it probably means that your burner is not hot enough. Be patient, and the heat should “catch up.” Stir-fry the mixture just enough so the noodles heat up evenly, but don’t break into small pieces. Make sure you use your wok spatula to scrape the bottom of the wok so the noodles don’t stick.

As the wok heats up, you will notice that the food will stick to it less readily! But if you need to, you can add a little oil to make it easier to stir-fry.

Continue cooking, stirring less frequently (so the noodles get slightly caramelized, creating that restaurant-style flavor) for another 1 to 2 minutes, or until the noodles are heated through. Serve hot with Homemade Chili Oil or Chiu Chow Sauce on the side!

Char Kway Teow

8 ounces (250 grams) dried wide rice noodles or 1 pound fresh rice noodles
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons regular soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon shrimp paste
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 teaspoon sugar
3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
2 Chinese sausages (about 115 grams), sliced ? inch thick
2 cloves garlic, sliced
4 ounces (115 grams) shrimp (31 to 40 size)
4 ounces (115 grams) fish cake or fish tofu, thinly sliced
4 ounces (115 grams) garlic chives, cut into 2 ½-inch pieces
1 tablespoon shaoxing wine (optional)
1 egg, lightly beaten
6 ounces (172 grams) mung bean sprouts

Soak the dried noodles in warm water for 30 to 45 minutes. Transfer to a colander and let the excess water drain. If you have fresh rice noodles, cut them into 1½-inch wide strips, and set them aside.

Add 2 teaspoons dark soy sauce, 2 tablespoons regular soy sauce, 1 tablespoon fish sauce, 1 teaspoon shrimp paste, 1 tablespoon oyster sauce, ? teaspoon ground white pepper, and 1 teaspoon sugar in a small bowl. Mix until combined, and set aside.
Heat your wok to medium heat, and spread 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil around the perimeter of your wok. Add the sliced Chinese sausages and stir-fry for 20 seconds.

Add the 2 cloves of sliced garlic, the shrimp, and the fish tofu. Continue stir-frying for another 20 seconds.

Now, turn the wok to high heat. Spread 1 tablespoon shaoxing wine around the perimeter of the wok.

Stir-fry for another 15 seconds. Add the noodles. Gently fold them into the rest of the ingredients. Gather everything in the middle of the wok to let the sides of the wok superheat. Pour ithe sauce mixture evenly over the noodles, and spread another tablespoon of vegetable oil around the perimeter of the wok.

Next, add the garlic chives. Gently mix the noodles (to minimize breakage) while spreading them around the perimeter of the wok to get that wok hay sear from the superheated sides of the wok. Because of the hot wok and the oil, the rice noodles shouldn’t stick.

While the noodles are searing, work quickly to create a space at the bottom of the wok and add the last tablespoon of oil with the slightly beaten egg. Stir the egg around for 15 seconds to cook it and break it up. You may want to pre-cook the egg the first time if you are more of a beginner cook!
Next add the mung bean sprouts and gently mix everything together for 1 minute.

If your Char Kway Teow looks dry, sprinkle 2 tablespoons of water over the noodles while stir-frying. You can also add a bit more vegetable oil if you like. Serve your Char Kway teow with chlli garlic paste or homemade chili oil on the side.

Mee Goreng

oil, for the pan
2 eggs
salt and freshly ground pepper
3 tablespoons kecap manis
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon sesame or shallot oil
1-2 teaspoons chili sauce
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
2 cloves garlic
1 large boneless skinless chicken thigh, cut into 1 inch pieces
2 links Chinese sausage, sliced
1/2 lb shrimp
1 lb fresh egg noodles (or cooked dried noodles)
2 cups bean sprouts
green onions/chives, cut into 2 inch lengths
tofu puffs
crispy shallots
fresh cilantro
thai chili
lime

Start off by making the egg ribbons. Lightly beat the eggs in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Heat a small non-stick frying pan on medium low heat. Add a touch of oil and swirl to coat. Pour in a thin layer of egg and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan, much like a crepe. Cook, untouched over low heat until egg sets and releases. Use a rubber spatula to flip and cook for another 10-15 seconds. Remove from the pan and repeat until all the eggs are cooked. Let cool slightly, roll and slice into ribbons.

In a small bowl, mix together the kecap manis, soy sauce, oyster sauce, ketchup, sesame oil, chili sauce and white pepper. Set aside.

Heat up a generous amount of oil in a wok or large frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until aromatic. Turn the heat up a bit and add the chicken and cook until lightly golden. Add the Chinese sausage and shrimp. Cook, stirring often, until the chicken is cooked through, the Chinese sausage is crispy, and the shrimp is cooked. Add the noodles, bean sprouts, tofu puffs, and the sauce and toss until everything is well coated and the noodles are heated through.

Enjoy immediately topped with crispy shallots and cilantro. Serve with lime for squeezing and chili for spice!

Coconut Pandan Chia Seed Pudding

Ingredients
1/2 cup chia seeds
1.5 cups hot water
14 ounce full fat coconut milk canned
1/2 teaspoon Pandan extract
1/3 cup sweetener or sugar

Mix the hot water in with the chia seeds. Using hot water causes the chia seeds to absorb the water and swell much faster than tap water–which means your pudding will be done sooner and you can eat sooner!

I mean, that’s really the only thing you need to know. Other than that, mix everything together, and let it chill.

The chia will make it gel and set into a pudding, and coconut milk will make it creamy, and the pandan will make it delicious.

Red Curry Chicken Noodle Soup

1/2 cup cilantro leaves with stems, loosely packed
1/4 cup water
1 medium shallot, roughly chopped
2 large cloves garlic, roughly chopped
One 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
1 1/2 tablespoons ancho chile powder (or other milder chile powder)
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1 Thai chile, roughly chopped (optional)
1 tablespoon canola or peanut oil
One 14 ounce can light coconut milk
One 14 1/2 ounce can chicken broth
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons fish sauce
1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1 cup shredded, cooked chicken (preferably dark meat)
3-4 ounces thin dried Chinese egg noodles (or in a pinch, sub angel hair pasta)
Fresh cilantro, Thai basil, thinly sliced shallot, sliced thai chile, chile oil, and lime wedges for serving

In a food processor, combine the cilantro, water, shallot, garlic, ginger, chile powder, cumin, turmeric, and Thai chile (if using). Process until a paste is formed.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a pot over medium heat. Once oil is hot, add the paste and cook, stirring often, for 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the coconut milk, chicken broth, lime juice, fish sauce, and salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the chicken and dried noodles, increase heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, until noodles are cooked.

Divide soup between three to four bowls and top with fresh cilantro, Thai basil, sliced shallot, sliced chiles, a drizzle of chile oil, and a lime wedge. Serve immediately.

Malaysian Chicken Curry Kapitan

8 fresh long red chiles, such as Holland, seeded and coarsely chopped
5 small dried red chiles, such as chiles de árbol, seeded
2 stalks of fresh lemongrass, tender inner white bulbs only, thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
3 small shallots, coarsely chopped, plus 4 medium shallots, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon water
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
4 whole chicken legs, split into legs and thighs (3 pounds)
Kosher salt
One 14-ounce can unsweetened coconut milk
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice Freshly ground pepper

In a food processor, combine the fresh and dried red chiles, lemongrass, garlic, coarsely chopped shallots and water and process to a fine paste.

In a large, deep skillet, heat 3 tablespoons of the vegetable oil. Season the chicken with salt and cook over moderately high heat, turning once, until browned on both sides, about 10 minutes. Transfer the chicken to plate.

Reduce the heat to moderate and add the chile paste. Cook, stirring constantly, until the paste begins to stick to the bottom of the pan and brown, about 7 minutes. Stir in the coconut milk and return the chicken to the skillet. Cover partially and simmer over moderately low heat until the chicken is cooked through and the sauce has thickened, about 25 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a medium skillet, heat the remaining 6 tablespoons of vegetable oil. Add the thinly sliced shallots and fry over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the shallots to paper towels to drain.

Transfer the chicken to plates. Add the lemon juice to the sauce and season with salt and pepper. Spoon the sauce over the chicken and sprinkle with the shallots.

Make Ahead: The recipe can be prepared through Step 3 and refrigerated for 2 days.

Serve with white rice.

Pressure Cooker Pandan Custard

1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
3 eggs
1/3 cup sweetener of choice
3-4 drops pandan extract
Green food coloring (optional)

Blend together the eggs, milk, sweetener and the pandan extract, and pour it into a 6-inch heatproof bowl. Cover with foil.

Place 2 cups of water into your liner, place a trivet in the liner, and place your bowl onto the trivet.

Cook at high pressure for 30 minutes and let it release pressure naturally. A knife inserted into the custard should come out clean.

Cool in refrigerator until the custard is set.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Malaysian Curry

(Adapted for hard boiled eggs)

1/2 cup (125 ml) vegetable oil
3 star anise
1 cinnamon quill
4 whole cloves
10 curry leaves
1 large red onion, chopped
80 g (2/3 cup) Malaysian meat curry powder
400 ml coconut milk
lime halves (optional)

hard boiled eggs, for serving

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add star anise, cinnamon, cloves and the curry leaves, and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds or until fragrant.

Add onion and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until lightly browned. Stir in curry powder.

Add 60 ml coconut milk and stir to combine, then cover and cook for 1 minute.

Add remaining 340 ml coconut milk and 125 ml water, then stir to combine.

Cover again, bring to the boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes or until thick.

Squeeze over the limes, then add them to the curry, if desired.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Malaysian Sweet and Sour

(Adapted for hard boiled eggs)

1 onion (cut into rings and then cut into half)
1/2 red chili (sliced thinly)
1/2 stalk scallion (sliced diagonally)
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon fish sauce (optional; if you don’t use fish sauce, add extra salt)
3 1/2 tablespoons sugar or to taste
3 tablespoons cooking oil
Tamarind pulp (the size of a small ping pong ball)
1 cup water

Hard boiled eggs for serving

In a small bowl, add one cup of water to the tamarind pulp and soak for 10 minutes. Squeeze the tamarind pulp to extract the juice. Use only the juice and discard the pulp.

Heat up your wok and add in the cooking oil.

Sauté the onions for 2-3 minutes until they turn slighly brown or aromatic

Lower the heat, add the tamarind juice and bring it to boil.
Add in sugar, salt, fish sauce, scallion and chili. Simmer for 1-2 minutes.

Serve hot.

Dry Fried Green Beans with Sambal Oelek

2 T neutral oil
1 lb green beans, whole, or Chinese long beans, cut into 4″ lengths
1 T chopped garlic
1 T chopped fresh ginger
1/4 C chopped scallions
1/2 t sambal oelek or Sambal
1 T soy sauce
1/2 t sugar
+ kosher salt

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wok over medium heat. After a minute (or as soon as the oil is getting to the oh shit this oil means business level of heat), add the green beans and stir-fry until they start to shrivel and turn brown, 8 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

Turn the heat up to high and add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Add the garlic, ginger, and scallions. Stir-fry for a few seconds until fragrant, then add the sambal. Add the green beans, soy sauce, and sugar. Toss until the beans are coated in sauce and heated through. Season to taste with salt and serve immediately.