Coconut Pandan Chia Seed Pudding

Ingredients
1/2 cup chia seeds
1.5 cups hot water
14 ounce full fat coconut milk canned
1/2 teaspoon Pandan extract
1/3 cup sweetener or sugar

Mix the hot water in with the chia seeds. Using hot water causes the chia seeds to absorb the water and swell much faster than tap water–which means your pudding will be done sooner and you can eat sooner!

I mean, that’s really the only thing you need to know. Other than that, mix everything together, and let it chill.

The chia will make it gel and set into a pudding, and coconut milk will make it creamy, and the pandan will make it delicious.

Burmese Noodle Bowl

2 medium yellow onions
4 garlic cloves
1 teaspoon ginger, grated
1 teaspoon shrimp paste (belachan)
1 tablespoon water
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
1 14 oz can coconut milk
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 packet rice noodles
1/2 cup shallots, thinly sliced and fried to a crisp
3 eggs, boiled and chopped
2 tablespoons chili powder
2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped fine
2 limes, quartered

Peel and chop the onions and garlic cloves into chunks. The size doesn’t matter as they are to be ground.

Place the onions, garlic, ginger, shrimp paste, and water in a blender or food processor. Pulse well till you have a smooth paste.

Clean and chop the chicken into bite size pieces. Wash well and drain.

Heat canola and sesame oils in a Dutch oven. Add the onion paste and sauté for 3 to 5 minutes to get the rawness out of the onions.

Add turmeric and chili powder. Stir to incorporate them into onion mix.

The chicken goes in next. Sauté the chicken for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring well to coat with spice mixture.

Add coconut milk and 1 cup of water. Stir well and bring the soup to a boil. Lower the flame, and let the soup come to a simmer. Cover the saucepan and let the soup simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Fill a large, deep saucepan with water and bring to a boil on a high flame. Add rice noodles to the boiling water. Take the saucepan off the heat and let rice noodles steep in water for 20 minutes. Drain well and keep aside.

Assemble the soup with a large helping of rice noodles in a soup bowl. Top with ladlefuls of soup. The noodles should swim in coconut broth.

Add pieces of chicken. Garnish with fried shallots, chopped egg, a sprinkling of chili powder, some cilantro, and a large squirt of lime juice.

Red Curry Chicken Noodle Soup

1/2 cup cilantro leaves with stems, loosely packed
1/4 cup water
1 medium shallot, roughly chopped
2 large cloves garlic, roughly chopped
One 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
1 1/2 tablespoons ancho chile powder (or other milder chile powder)
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1 Thai chile, roughly chopped (optional)
1 tablespoon canola or peanut oil
One 14 ounce can light coconut milk
One 14 1/2 ounce can chicken broth
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons fish sauce
1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1 cup shredded, cooked chicken (preferably dark meat)
3-4 ounces thin dried Chinese egg noodles (or in a pinch, sub angel hair pasta)
Fresh cilantro, Thai basil, thinly sliced shallot, sliced thai chile, chile oil, and lime wedges for serving

In a food processor, combine the cilantro, water, shallot, garlic, ginger, chile powder, cumin, turmeric, and Thai chile (if using). Process until a paste is formed.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a pot over medium heat. Once oil is hot, add the paste and cook, stirring often, for 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the coconut milk, chicken broth, lime juice, fish sauce, and salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the chicken and dried noodles, increase heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, until noodles are cooked.

Divide soup between three to four bowls and top with fresh cilantro, Thai basil, sliced shallot, sliced chiles, a drizzle of chile oil, and a lime wedge. Serve immediately.

Tamarind Spiced Cashews with Mint

4 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
1 teaspoon tomato paste
1 1/2 teaspoons tamarind concentrate or paste
1 pound roasted unsalted cashews
70 grams unsweetened coconut flakes (about 1 cup)
Large pinch cayenne, plus more to taste
10 grams ground garam masala, preferably freshly toasted and ground (about 1 tablespoon)
8 grams coarse kosher salt, plus more for sprinkling (about 1 1/4 teaspoons)
Chopped fresh mint, for serving

Heat oven to 300 degrees.

In a medium pot, melt butter, honey, brown sugar, tomato paste and tamarind. Add nuts, coconut, cayenne, garam masala and salt and toss until coated. Spread on baking sheet.

Bake for about 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until mixture is toasted and sugars have begun to caramelize. Sprinkle nuts lightly with salt and let cool completely. Before serving, break up nuts and sprinkle with mint. (Nuts can be stored in an airtight container up to 2 weeks, but don’t add mint until serving.)

Meatballs in Coconut Milk

Meatballs
1 tbsp coconut oil
1 lb grass fed ground beef
1/2 onion
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup almond flour
2 tbsp almond milk
1 tbsp pink Himalayan sea salt

Coconut Broth
1 cup coconut milk
1 cup broth

Spices
2 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp crushed red pepper
1 stalk lemongrass
1 inch fresh ginger
lime zest

On an oiled pan, cook garlic and onions until fragrant and translucent.

Meanwhile, combine almond flour and almond milk to create a paste.

Take your ground beef and add salt and your almond paste.

When your onions and garlic are done cooking, add them to the ground beef and using your hands, mix and squeeze to combine.

Begin creating your meatballs by taking a small handful of ground beef and giving it a good squeeze to eliminate air bubbles. Roll them in your hands gently creating uniformly sized balls about 2 inches in diameter. The smaller the meatballs, the faster they’ll cook. Keep that in mind so they don’t overcook and dry out.

Once your meatballs are assembled, use the same pan to brown the meatballs on both sides. Arrange the meatballs along the edge of the pan leaving the center empty.

While the meatballs are browning, add your spices into the empty center of the pan. The spices will begin to heat and denature, releasing their flavor into the pan. You’ll see a sort of paste form in the oily center of the pan.

After the meatballs are browned on both sides, you can pour in the coconut milk and broth. Give it a good shake to disperse the spices.

Add in your lemongrass stalk (whacked with the blunt end of a knife to release its oils) and fresh ginger and let simmer for about 15 minutes.

Take one of the meatballs out and cut it in half to see if it’s cooked throughout. If it is, you’re set! If it’s not, check on another again in about 3-5 minutes.

Serve with some coconut broth in a bowl and your favorite side dish!

Roasted Lemongrass Chicken

5 tablespoons canola oil or vegetable oil (divided)
3 tablespoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon sugar, divided
2 shallots, peeled
3 garlic cloves
2 fresh lemongrass stalks, cut into pieces
1 lime, zested
8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs

Preheat your oven to 350°F.

In the bowl of a food processor, add 3 tablespoons oil, the fish sauce, oyster sauce, pepper flakes, sugar, shallots, garlic, lemongrass, and lime zest. Process until smooth. Add to a bowl, along with the chicken, and toss to coat the chicken in the marinade. Cover, transfer to the fridge, and marinate for 1-4 hours.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a 12-inch ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Reserving the marinade, add chicken to the skillet skin side down. Cook for 4 minutes. Turn the chicken, add the reserved marinade to the skillet, and transfer to the oven. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through.

Brush the oil and marinade in the bottom of the pan on top of the chicken. Serve with lime wedges and chopped Th

Garlic Lemongrass Chicken (or Fish, or Pork)

5 plump lemongrass stalks, inner bulb only, coarsely chopped
3 scallions, white and light green parts only, coarsely chopped
1 large garlic clove, smashed
1 large jalapeño, chopped
Pinch of sugar
1/4 cup vegetable oil, plus more for brushing
Salt and freshly ground pepper
4 pounds skinless, boneless chicken thighs and breasts (or on pork tenderloin or any firm, white-fleshed fish, such as snapper, sea bass or halibut)

In a food processor, pulse the lemongrass until finely chopped. Add the scallions, garlic, jalapeño and sugar and pulse until finely chopped. With the machine on, add the 1/4 cup of vegetable oil in a steady stream and process to a fine paste. Season the paste with salt and pepper.

Using a small, sharp knife, make 1/2-inch-deep slashes into the chicken and rub the paste all over, working it into the slashes. Marinate the chicken for 15 minutes at room temperature or refrigerate overnight.

Light a grill. Brush the chicken with oil, season with salt and pepper and grill over a medium-hot fire, turning occasionally, until browned and cooked through, about 15 minutes.

Pressure Cooker Pandan Custard

1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
3 eggs
1/3 cup sweetener of choice
3-4 drops pandan extract
Green food coloring (optional)

Blend together the eggs, milk, sweetener and the pandan extract, and pour it into a 6-inch heatproof bowl. Cover with foil.

Place 2 cups of water into your liner, place a trivet in the liner, and place your bowl onto the trivet.

Cook at high pressure for 30 minutes and let it release pressure naturally. A knife inserted into the custard should come out clean.

Cool in refrigerator until the custard is set.

Burmese Red Chili Oil

1 cup packed dried red chiles, soaked in lukewarm water for 20 minutes
1 cup peanut oil

Drain the chiles and remove and discard the stems. Put the chiles in a food processor and process to a coarse paste.

Pour the oil into a nonreactive pan and set over medium heat. Add the chile paste and bring to a bubbling boil, then remove from the heat and let stand until cooled to room temperature.

You can store the oil with the chiles in it, but in Burma the oil often is served on its own. For clear oil, drain the oil through a sieve into a clean, dry glass jar and seal with the lid. Store away from heat and light. You can keep the chiles in another glass jar for a spicy condiment, or discard them.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Tamarind Dressing

3 ounces tamarind pulp (3-by-3-by-3/4- inch block)
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons sriracha, or to taste
5 cloves garlic, grated
1/4 teaspoon MSG (optional)
2 teaspoons fish sauce, or to taste
4 teaspoons sugar, or to taste

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the tamarind pulp and 1 1/2 cups water. Break up the tamarind with a spoon; cook until the chunks are all broken up and the liquid looks thick and syrupy. Pass the mixture through a strainer.

Combine the tamarind liquid with the salt, sriracha, grated garlic, MSG, fish sauce and sugar. Adjust with more fish sauce, sugar, sriracha or water to taste. Extra dressing keeps for 1 month in the refrigerator.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Laotian Chili Paste

6 medium or 9 small shallots, unpeeled
1 1/2 cups garlic cloves (from 3 to 4 heads), unpeeled
6 (or up to 10) Thai dried red chiles
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped galangal
Several pinches of salt
2 teaspoons Thai fish sauce, or more to taste
2 to 3 tablespoons warm water
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh coriander

Heat a cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Place the shallots and garlic in the skillet and dry-roast until browned and blackened on all sides, about 5 minutes. Remove from the skillet and set aside to cool slightly.

Meanwhile, place the skillet over medium heat, add the dried chiles, and dry-roast, turning and moving them frequently, until they start to give off an aroma; they should not blacken or burn—just heat gently until they are dried out and brittle. Alternatively, you can roast the shallots, garlic, and chiles over a charcoal or gas grill.

“Transfer the chiles to a mortar and pound them to a powder (discard any tough stems). Add the galangal and a pinch of salt and pound to a paste. Transfer the mixture to a small bowl and set aside. Alternatively, place the chiles and galangal in a blender or food processor and chop them as fine as possible.

Slide the peels off the shallots and garlic and discard. Coarsely chop the shallots, place them in the mortar with a pinch of salt, and pound to a smooth paste. Add the paste to the mixture in the small bowl, then place the garlic cloves and a pinch of salt in the mortar and pound to a smooth paste. Add all the pounded ingredients to the mortar and pound together. Alternatively, add the shallots and garlic to the food processor with a pinch of salt and process. Add the fish sauce and 2 tablespoons of the warm water and pound or stir to blend well. The paste should be very moist and smooth; add a little more warm water if you wish. Taste for salt and add a little more salt or fish sauce if you wish. Stir in half the coriander.

Transfer the sauce to a small bowl. Sprinkle the remaining coriander over the top. Serve at room temperature. Store leftovers in a sealed contained in the refrigerator for several weeks.

Makes just over 1 cup thick sauce.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Nam Prik Nun Tai Yai

4 to 5 banana chiles (about 1/4 pound)
1/4 pound shallots, cut in half, quartered if very large
6 to 8 cloves garlic, halved if large
1/2 pound cherry tomatoes
2 to 3 tablespoons coriander leaves, coarsely torn
2 teaspoons salt, or to taste
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

Heat a charcoal or gas grill. Place the chiles, shallots, garlic, and tomatoes on a fine-mesh rack on the grill and grill until well blackened in spots on one side, then turn with tongs and repeat on the other side, turning the tomatoes as necessary to expose all sides to the heat.

Alternatively, heat two heavy skillets over high heat (if you have only one skillet, the vegetables will have to be cooked in sequence; with two, you can get everything cooked at the same time). Place the chiles, shallots, and garlic cloves in one skillet and place the tomatoes in the other. Lower the heat to medium-high under both skillets. Press down gently on the chiles to expose them to the heat; then, as one side blackens, use tongs or a wooden spatula to turn them. Similarly, turn the shallots and garlic as they blacken on one side to cook the other side. Use tongs to turn the tomatoes, exposing all sides to the heat.

Remove the vegetables from the grill or skillets when they seem well scorched and softened, about 8 to 10 minutes. Place on a cutting board to cool slightly. Slice off and discard the stem end of the chiles, slice the chiles lengthwise in half, and discard the seeds (unless you want a very hot salsa). Chop well, then transfer to a medium bowl. Finely chop the remaining vegetables and transfer, together with the juices from the tomatoes, to the bowl. Add the coriander, salt, and lime juice and stir to blend. The sauce will be chunky and a little bit soupy in texture. (The ingredients can be chopped together in a food processor, but the sauce is more traditional and more interesting with a hand-chopped texture.)

If you have time, let the sauce stand for 30 minutes before serving to allow the flavors to blend and mellow. Store in a covered nonreactive container in the refrigerator. The salsa will keep for 4 to 5 days. Bring back to room temperature before serving.

MAKES about 1½ cups sauce

NOTE: The Shan have a whole repertoire of grilled chile salsas, building on the ingredients in this one. For example, you could grill mushrooms or eggplant, then chop and add to this, adjusting the seasonings as necessary.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Burmese Tomato Chutney

1 tablespoon tamarind pulp, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup hot water
About 2 tablespoons chopped shallots
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped garlic
Salt
3 dried red chiles, soaked in water for 10 minutes and drained
Scant 1/4 cup peanut oil
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon shrimp paste
1 1/2 pounds ripe tomatoes, finely chopped (about 3 cups), or 3 cups crushed canned tomatoes, preferably unseasoned
1/4 cup Dried Shrimp Powder
3 or 4 green cayenne chiles, seeded and cut lengthwise into 3 or 4 strips each
About 1 tablespoon fish sauce, to taste
About 2 tablespoons chopped coriander

Place the tamarind pulp in a small bowl, add the hot water, and let soak for 10 minutes.
Mash the tamarind with a fork to separate the seeds and fibers from the pulp. Press the tamarind through a sieve set over a bowl, using the back of a spoon to extract as much liquid as possible from the pulp. Set the tamarind liquid aside; discard the pulp.

If you have a mortar, pound the shallots and garlic to a paste with a pinch of salt, then pound the chiles to a paste. Alternatively, mince the shallots and garlic to a paste with the salt, then mince the chiles. Set aside.

Place a wide heavy skillet or heavy pot or a wok over medium heat. Add the oil and turmeric and stir, then add the shallots and garlic and stir-fry for a minute or two. Add the reserved chiles and shrimp paste and stir briefly to blend. Add the tamarind liquid and tomatoes. Stir well, bring to a boil, then lower the heat slightly and cook at a strong simmer until the tomatoes are softened and a little thickened, about 10 minutes.

Stir in the shrimp powder and cayenne chiles and cook for several minutes, stirring occasionally to make sure that nothing is sticking to the bottom of the pan, until the chiles are softened. Add the fish sauce, then taste and adjust the seasonings if you wish.

Turn out into a bowl and let cool to room temperature. Stored in a well-sealed glass jar in the refrigerator, the chutney will keep for 4 days.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Lemongrass-Tumeric Curry Sauce

(Adapted for hard boiled eggs)

4 lemongrass stalks, trimmed, tender center part only
6 medium garlic cloves, peeled
6 medium shallots, peeled
3 medium serrano chiles, stemmed
3-inch piece of ginger, peeled
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground turmeric

1/4 cup good extra-virgin coconut, sunflower or olive oil
a drizzle of lime oil or zest of one lime, optional

Combine the lemongrass, garlic, shallots, chiles, ginger, cumin, and turmeric, and pulse until the ingredients start to come together. You can add the oil at this point, and blend again. Stir in the lime oil or zest.

The paste will keep in the refrigerator for about a week. Freeze any paste you wont use for future use.

Stir a bit into thick yogurt with a little salt or saute with coconut milk.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Nam Jim Jaew

Tamarind pulp 1-1/2 tablespoons
Fish sauce 2 tablespoons
Ground red chili, or dried red chili flakes for the less spicy version, 1 teaspoon – 1 tablespoon (as much or as little as you prefer, actually)
Palm sugar 1/4 teaspoon
Toasted rice 1/4 teaspoon – 2 teaspoons can be added (the more toasted rice the thicker the sauce would be)
Chopped green onion 1/2 – 1 teaspoon

Simple… just mix them all together.

Ideas for Egg Lunches: Sesame Oil and Sambal Oelek

(Adapted for hard boiled eggs)

1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons sambal olek
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
3 scallions

Treat your soba noodles as you would any pasta. Cook the noodles in a pot of salted, boiling water until tender, about five minutes. Strain noodles and transfer to medium-large bowl. Drizzle in about one tablespoon of sesame oil until you notice that the noodles give off an oily sheen from being well-coated. Pop that bowl in the refrigerator and forget about it until the noodles have chilled out.

While those soba noodles are chilling, combine about 1 tablespoon of ginger and 1 tablespoon of garlic in a small to medium-sized bowl. Add Indonesian hot sauce sambal oelek to that (about 1½ tablespoons) along with around two tablespoons soy sauce, two tablespoons mirin, two tablespoons lime juice, two tablespoons sesame oil, one tablespoon sesame seeds, and the sliced crunchy white-green bottoms of two or three scallions (save the green parts for the next step). Whisk to combine.

Remove the chilled soba noodles from the refrigerator and add half of the freshly whisked sauce and toss. Add the other half, along with the sliced green-only tops of two to three scallions. Make sure the noodles are generously coated in the spicy-sweet-salty-nutty dressing, and serve with sesame seeds and a sprinkle of whatever remaining scallion slices you have left.

Coconut Rice

2 cups jasmine rice
1 13.5 oz. can coconut milk
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup toasted coconut flakes

Soak the rice in water for 15 minutes. Drain. Add the drained rice to a medium pot. In a 2-4 cup capacity wet measuring cup, pour in the can of coconut milk, and then add water until you hit just under 2 cups of liquid total. Add to the pot, along with the sugar and salt.

Put the pan on the stove and bring to a boil. Once boiling, immediately gift the pot a stir, cover, and reduce the heat to low. Cook until all the liquid has been absorbed, about 25 minutes. Remove from heat, fluff the rice with a fork, and keep covered until ready to serve.

Just before serving, stir in the toasted coconut flakes.

Dry Fried Green Beans with Sambal Oelek

2 T neutral oil
1 lb green beans, whole, or Chinese long beans, cut into 4″ lengths
1 T chopped garlic
1 T chopped fresh ginger
1/4 C chopped scallions
1/2 t sambal oelek or Sambal
1 T soy sauce
1/2 t sugar
+ kosher salt

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wok over medium heat. After a minute (or as soon as the oil is getting to the oh shit this oil means business level of heat), add the green beans and stir-fry until they start to shrivel and turn brown, 8 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

Turn the heat up to high and add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Add the garlic, ginger, and scallions. Stir-fry for a few seconds until fragrant, then add the sambal. Add the green beans, soy sauce, and sugar. Toss until the beans are coated in sauce and heated through. Season to taste with salt and serve immediately.

Cold Rice Noodles with Lemongrass Shrimp

1 pound medium shrimp, peeled, tails intact, deveined
1/2 lemongrass stalk, tough outer layer removed, lightly smashed, finely chopped
1 Fresno chile, with seeds, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon sugar
8 oz. rice vermicelli noodles
Vegetable oil (for grilling)
1/2 cucumber, peeled, cut into thin strips
1 medium carrot, peeled, cut into thin strips
1/2 cup salted, roasted peanuts, coarsely chopped

Thai basil, mint, and/or cilantro sprigs, and pickled shallots for serving
Nuoc Cham for serving

Toss shrimp, lemongrass, chile, garlic, salt, and sugar in a medium bowl. Cover and chill at least 1 hour.

Cook noodles according to package directions. Using tongs or a spider, transfer noodles to a colander and run under cold water to stop cooking; set aside.

Prepare grill for medium-high heat; oil grill grate. Grill shrimp until cooked through, about 2 minutes per side.

Top noodles with shrimp, cucumber, carrot, peanuts, herbs, and Pickled Whole Shallots, and serve with Nuoc Cham.

DO AHEAD: Shrimp can be marinated 12 hours ahead. Cover and chill.

Cold Sesame Soba Noodles

1 package soba noodles
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons sambal olek
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons lime juice
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
3 scallions

Treat your soba noodles as you would any pasta. Cook the noodles in a pot of salted, boiling water until tender, about five minutes. Strain noodles and transfer to medium-large bowl. Drizzle in about one tablespoon of sesame oil until you notice that the noodles give off an oily sheen from being well-coated. Pop that bowl in the refrigerator and forget about it until the noodles have chilled out.

While those soba noodles are chilling, combine about 1 tablespoon of ginger and 1 tablespoon of garlic in a small to medium-sized bowl. Add Indonesian hot sauce sambal oelek to that (about 1½ tablespoons) along with around two tablespoons soy sauce, two tablespoons mirin, two tablespoons lime juice, two tablespoons sesame oil, one tablespoon sesame seeds, and the sliced crunchy white-green bottoms of two or three scallions (save the green parts for the next step). Whisk to combine.

Remove the chilled soba noodles from the refrigerator and add half of the freshly whisked sauce and toss. Add the other half, along with the sliced green-only tops of two to three scallions. Make sure the noodles are generously coated in the spicy-sweet-salty-nutty dressing, and serve with sesame seeds and a sprinkle of whatever remaining scallion slices you have left.