Panch Phoran

Ingredients
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1 tablespoon brown mustard seeds
1 tablespoon fennel seeds
1 tablespoon nigella seeds (also called black cumin or kalonji)
1 1/2 teaspoons fenugreek seeds

Combine the seeds in a small bowl. Store in an airtight container.
Depending on what kind of dish you make with these seeds, they can either be fried briefly in oil or dry roasted to coax out their rich flavors.

Crispy Tofu

If you’ve had really great tofu, you know that it is a complete game-changer: perfectly golden on the outside, wildly soft and spongey on the inside, with the most amazing ability to soak up the sauce without getting soggy. It feels like a tiny miracle — and you can 100% make it at home.

There are a few tricks to perfect tofu. First, tossing cubed tofu with cornstarch will help you get a crispier exterior when baking or stir-frying. Pressing the block of tofu to eliminate excess moisture also helps. And you’ll want to make sure you’re using high enough heat. However, there is one trick that basically guarantees success.

The key to getting restaurant-style tofu texture at home is your freezer. Yes, freezing tofu is the very best strategy for cooking up perfectly soft, chewy tofu that soaks up sauce like a sponge.

As mentioned above, pressing tofu is essential for removing liquid. But no matter how long you press that block of tofu or how much weight you pile on top, it still seems to hold onto a lot of water. When you freeze the tofu overnight, and then thaw it at room temperature, all of the water basically pours right out — no extra pressing necessary.

While you can freeze any variety of tofu, extra-firm is the best option when you want to replicate the texture of the tofu from your favorite Chinese place. First, you’ll want to cut the tofu. Take your pick between cutting it into cubes, triangles, slabs, or just tearing it into pieces. Place the tofu pieces in a single layer on a baking sheet and freeze until solid. Then store in a freezer bag or container until you’re ready to use. Thaw the tofu at room temperature before cooking.

Game-Changing Crispy Topping

3 tablespoons olive oil
3/4 cup fresh coarse or panko bread crumbs
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup finely grated pecorino cheese, plus more for serving

Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

Add bread crumbs and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until they’re evenly toasted and golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes.

Add cup pecorino and toss to coat, letting the cheese melt and clump among the bread crumbs (think granola-like clusters).

Remove from heat and transfer to a small bowl or plate. Use on mac and cheese or anything that needs a crispy topping.

Magic Spice Blend

1/3 cup dark brown sugar
3 tablespoons kosher salt
3 tablespoons smoked paprika (you can use regular sweet paprika if you don’t like the taste of smoked)
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon freshly cracked black pepper
2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon celery seed, crushed in the palm of your hand

Spoon all of the ingredients into a Mason jar and shake. I like to keep this by my stove to sprinkle over everything: soft-boiled eggs, sliced cucumbers, chicken, pork chops, and especially ribs.

Ultimate Chili Oil

2 tablespoons soy sauce
4 garlic cloves, grated
1/2 cup (50 g) Sichuan (spicier) or Korean (milder) chile flakes
1 star anise pod
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon curry powder
2 cups (480 mL) canola oil
3 tablespoons white sesame seeds
2 dried bay leaves
2 tablespoons finely ground Sichuan peppercorns

Mix the soy sauce and grated garlic together. Set aside.

Using a spice grinder, grind the chile flakes, star anise pod, coriander, cumin, and curry powder into a fine powder. In a large saucepan at least 6 inches (15 cm) deep, combine the spice powder with the oil, sesame seeds, and bay leaves. Set it over medium heat and bring the mixture to a gentle boil. Boil for 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until the chile flakes have turned maroon in color (but not black!).

When the chile flakes have turned to the desired color, turn off the heat immediately, then add the ground Sichuan peppercorns. Stir and let fry in the residual heat for about 30 seconds, then add the soy sauce/garlic mixture. The oil will boil up a little due to the added moisture (which is why we’re using a deep pot). Just keep stirring until the sizzling has died down.

Let the chile oil sit at room temperature for at least 2 hours (or best overnight) before using. Keep in an airtight jar in the fridge for up to 3 months.

Burmese Shallot (or Garlic) Oil

1 cup peanut oil
2 cups (about 1/2 pound) thinly sliced Asian or European shallots

Place a wide heavy skillet or a large stable wok over medium-high heat and add the oil. Toss in a slice of shallot. As the oil heats, it will rise to the surface, sizzling lightly. When it’s reached the surface, add the rest of the shallots (carefully!), and lower the heat to medium. (The shallots may seem crowded, but they’ll shrink as they cook.)

Stir gently and frequently with a long-handled wooden spoon or a spider. The shallots will bubble as they give off their moisture. If they start to brown early, in the first 5 minutes, lower the heat a little more.

“After about 10 minutes, they should start to color. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally to prevent them from sticking to the pan or to each other, until they have turned a golden brown, another 3 minutes or so.

Line a plate with paper towels. Use tongs or a spider to lift a clump of fried shallots out of the oil, pausing for a moment to shake off excess oil into the pan, then place on the paper towel. Turn off the heat, transfer the remaining shallots to the plate, and blot gently with another paper towel. Separate any clumps and toss them a little, then let them air-dry 5 to 10 minutes, so they crisp up and cool. (If your kitchen is very hot and humid, they may not crisp up; don’t worry, the flavor will still be there.)

Transfer the shallots to a clean, dry, widemouthed glass jar. Once they have cooled completely, seal tightly. Transfer the oil to another clean dry jar, using all but the very last of it, which will have some stray pieces of shallot debris. (You can set that oil aside for stir-frying.) Once the oil has cooled completely, cover tightly, and store in a cool dark place.

You can use a similar technique to make garlic oil, but slice the garlic thicker (a scant ¼ inch), rather than into thin slices, since it cooks much more quickly than shallots. Heat ½ cup peanut oil over medium-high heat, add ? cup or so sliced garlic, and fry over medium heat until just golden, about 5 minutes. Lift out the garlic and set aside to crisp up. Store the oil as above. Fried garlic does not keep as well as fried shallots; refrigerate and use within 5 days.

Pressure Cooker Polenta

Polenta
1 cup (173 grams) coarse polenta
4 1/2 cups cups (1,023 grams) water
1 teaspoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Bonuses (optional)

1/2 to 1 cups grated or crumbled cheese (such as sharp cheddar, Parmesan, pecorino, Gouda, blue), for stirring in and sprinkling on top.

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, for stirring in and sprinkling on top, or another ground spice to taste
Fresh herbs (such as minced chives, thyme leaves, finely chopped sage, or roughly chopped parsley), for stirring in and/or sprinkling on top.

Classic Panna Cotta

2 (1/4-oz.) envelope unflavored gelatin (about 2 1/4 teaspoons)
3 tablespoons cold water
2 cups whole milk
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 vanilla bean pod, split
2 cups buttermilk
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
5 tablespoons apricot jam, peach preserves, or orange marmalade, warmed

Sprinkle gelatin over 3 tablespoons cold water, and let stand 5 minutes to dissolve, stirring once. Meanwhile, heat milk and sugar in a small saucepan over medium. Cook, whisking often, until sugar dissolves and mixture is hot, about 5 minutes (do not boil). Remove from heat; whisk in gelatin mixture until fully dissolved. Let cool slightly, whisking occasionally, about 10 minutes. Scrape seeds from vanilla bean pod into gelatin mixture; discard pod. Gently whisk in buttermilk and salt.

Divide mixture evenly among 8 (12-ounce) straight-sided glasses (about 1/2 cup each). Cover and chill until set, at least 8 hours or up to overnight. Serve in glasses or invert onto serving plates. Spoon about 2 teaspoons jam or marmalade on each serving.

Shortbread

16 tablespoons (2 sticks/226 grams) unsalted butter, softened
1/2 cup (113 grams) granulated sugar
1 2/3 cups (226 grams) all-purpose flour
1/2 cup (113 grams) semolina
2 tablespoons demerara sugar

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees with a rack in the middle position. Have ready a 9-by-13 baking pan.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together the butter and sugar on low speed just until combined. (You’re only looking to incorporate them, not add a lot of air to the mixture.) Alternately, you can use a handheld mixer or even a wooden spoon in a large bowl. Stir in the flour and semolina on low speed until combined. The dough won’t come together into a cohesive mass, so don’t be surprised if it’s crumbly. Clumps, however, should form when pressed together between your fingers. You can briefly knead the dough by hand, if needed.

Press the mixture into the pan, level and smooth the top using the bottom of a dry measuring cup or the back of a spoon. Sprinkle with the demerara sugar, and bake for about 30 to 35 minutes until pale golden brown.

Remove from the oven and let the pan cool on a wire rack for 5 minutes. With the tip of a sharp knife, score the slab to form 24 triangles (we accomplished this with three rows of four squares that we then cut in half). Let the shortbread cool completely in the pan before lifting the pieces out.

Note: Mary Berry mixes the all-purpose flour with semolina, a coarse flour you often find in pizza or pasta, for extra crunch. For an even more melt-away mouthfeel, swap in equal amounts of cornstarch or rice flour for the semolina. Prefer only flour? That’s fine, too. Whatever you use, be sure not to overwork the mixture, as it will create too much gluten and toughen the dough.

Make Ahead: The shortbread will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 weeks.

Stir-Fry Sauce for Any Meat and Vegetable

1 1/2 cups chicken stock (or vegetable or mushroom stock; 350ml)
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
1 tablespoon brown sugar (or granulated sugar)
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1/4 cup soy sauce (can sub gluten-free soy sauce or tamari)
1 1/2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce (or vegetarian or gluten-free oyster sauce)
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt

In a jar with a tight lid (must hold 2 cups of liquid), combine all of the stir fry sauce ingredients together and shake well.

This sauce should keep for a few weeks in the refrigerator; all you need to do is measure and pour out what you need for your dish.

Makes enough sauce for about 3 dishes. Nutrition info is for one out of twelve servings of sauce, assuming that there are 4 servings per dish

HOW TO USE THIS STIR-FRY SAUCE:

1. MARINATE YOUR PROTEIN:

Marinate 12 ounces of sliced beef, chicken or pork with:

2 tablespoons water
A pinch or more of baking soda (for beef only)
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch

2. PREPARE AROMATICS:

Mince 3 cloves of garlic, grate a teaspoon of ginger, and perhaps slice 1 or 2 scallions into 2-inch lengths.

3. SLICE VEGETABLES:

Prepare the vegetables ahead of time, slicing celery, carrots, bell peppers, snow peas, onions, mushrooms, zucchini, eggplant, and/or broccoli. Use whatever you like and make sure to cut the vegetables small/thinly enough so that they’ll cook quickly (i.e. a couple of minutes).

4. PREPARE YOUR THICKENER:

2 tablespoons water mixed with 2 tablespoons cornstarch.

5. SEAR MEAT:

Add 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to your hot wok (it should be almost smoking). Add the meat, sear on both sides, and set aside.

HOW TO USE THIS STIR-FRY SAUCE:

1. MARINATE YOUR PROTEIN:

Marinate 12 ounces of sliced beef, chicken or pork with:

2 tablespoons water
A pinch or more of baking soda (for beef only)
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2. PREPARE AROMATICS:

I like to cut my aromatics fresh, so I will mince 3 cloves of garlic, grate a teaspoon of ginger, and perhaps slice 1 or 2 scallions into 2-inch lengths if I have some.

3. SLICE VEGETABLES:

I’ll prepare the vegetables ahead of time, slicing celery, carrots, bell peppers, snow peas, onions, mushrooms, zucchini, eggplant, and/or broccoli. Use whatever you like and make sure to cut the vegetables small/thinly enough so that they’ll cook quickly (i.e. a couple of minutes).

4. PREPARE YOUR THICKENER:

2 tablespoons water mixed with 2 tablespoons cornstarch.

5. SEAR MEAT:

Add 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to your hot wok (it should be almost smoking). Add the meat, sear on both sides, and set aside.

Searing Meat in Wok, thewoksoflife.com

6. ASSEMBLE STIR-FRY

Add another tablespoon of oil and add the garlic and ginger. (If you also sliced scallions, you can add the white parts of the scallion at this stage.)

After a few seconds, add the vegetables and stir fry for 1 minute or until just softened.

Add about 2/3 cup of stir fry sauce (more or less depending on how much sauce you like), and heat until simmering.

And add in the seared meat.

Bring to a boil and stir in the cornstarch slurry until the sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon (you may need a little more or a little less cornstarch slurry depending on how much sauce you added and how high your heat is). Add the green parts of your scallions (if using), and cook for another 15 to 20 seconds.

Serve over rice.

Chinese Handmade Noodles

300 grams bread flour (also known as strong flour or high-gluten flour, about 2 U.S. cups)
1/4 teaspoon salt (1.5g)
150 ml water (about 2/3 cup)

Add the bread flour and salt to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment (or a large regular mixing bowl) and whisk together to incorporate.

Turn the mixer on low speed, and gradually add the water in two batches, giving the flour time to absorb the water with each addition. If doing this by hand, simply stir with your hands as you gradually add the water.

The mixture will eventually form a shaggy dough after 5 minutes of kneading. If the mixer fails to bring it all together, turn off the mixer and push the dough together with your hands.
Once the dough has formed a relatively cohesive ball (it will look lumpy), continue to knead by with the mixer for 10 minutes or by hand for 15 minutes. Avoid the temptation to add additional water, as this will affect the texture of your noodles.

Cover the dough with an overturned bowl, and allow it to rest for 30 minutes. During this time, it will continue to absorb moisture, and become more pliable and elastic.

After the dough has rested, knead it a few more times to get any air bubbles out of it. Form into a ball and cut the ball in half.

On a floured surface, roll one half of the dough into a thin sheet, about 2mm thick––this will take time! Flour the surface of the sheet thoroughly, flip over, and thoroughly flour the other side.

Once floured, fold the dough so you have 4 layers. Slice the noodles with a sharp knife to your desired thickness. We decided to cut them about ?-inch thick. As you’re cutting the noodles, gently separate them out with your hands and toss them in flour so they don’t stick.

Bring a pot of water to a boil and cook the noodles for 1 to 3 minutes, depending on the thickness. Keep an eye on the noodles as they cook and taste them to determine when they’re cooked (there is a lot of variation depending on how thinly they were rolled and cut, so test in real time to determine when they’re cooked (there is a lot of variation depending on how thinly they were rolled and cut, so test in real time to determine when they’re done). Serve in soup or with sauce as desired!

You can use your Chinese handmade noodles in any noodle soup or sauced noodle dish of choice! Here are some ideas:

15-Minute Hot Oil Noodles (our pick for something quick and easy, and what is pictured in the prepared photos in this post!)
10-Minute Sesame Noodles
Scallion Oil Noodles
Dan Dan Noodles
Hot Pot Sauce Noodles
Lao Gan Ma Noodles
Steamed Noodles and Green Beans
Big Plate Chicken with Noodles
Beijing Fried Sauce Noodles (Zha Jiang Mian)
Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup
Yang Chun Noodle Soup
Spicy Beef Noodle Soup

Chinese Hot Mustard

1 tablespoon mustard powder
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon white pepper
1 1/2 teaspoon hot water
1/2 teaspoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon rice vinegar optional

Mix the dry ingredients together in a small bowl until evenly combined. Add water and stir well until a liquid paste forms and all dry ingredients are absorbed. Next, add oil and vinegar and stir well until evenly combined.

Let your Chinese hot mustard rest for 10 minutes covered, and re-stir to ensure the dry ingredients have fully absorbed. At this point, taste your Chinese Hot Mustard and adjust it to your own preferences.

Add a little more water or oil if you like a thinner in consistency. Add more vinegar if you like it a tad tart. Omit the vinegar altogether if you like it spicier, since vinegar makes your mustard a bit mellower in flavor. Add more white pepper and/or mustard powder if you like it spicier.

NOTE: Since Chinese mustard is so easy to make, we like to make in small amounts to have it fresh every time. Feel free to multiply the ingredients proportionally to make larger batches.

Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Kosher salt and black pepper
1 pound elbow macaroni
2 cups whole milk
2 large eggs
4 cups shredded extra-sharp Cheddar (about 16 ounces)
1/2 cup unsalted butter (1 stick), melted
2 cups shredded Colby Jack (about 8 ounces)

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Bring a large pot of generously salted water to a boil. Add macaroni and cook according to package directions until a little under al dente, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a colander and rinse under cold water to stop cooking. Set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk milk and eggs. Add cooked macaroni, 2 cups extra-sharp Cheddar, melted butter, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and stir until well combined.

Add half the macaroni mixture to a 9-by-13-inch baking dish in an even layer. Sprinkle 1 1/2 cups Colby Jack evenly on top. Spread the remaining macaroni mixture on top in an even layer. Cover with aluminum foil, transfer to the middle rack of the oven and bake for 20 minutes.

Remove from oven. Carefully remove and discard the aluminum foil. Top the macaroni mixture with the remaining 2 cups Cheddar and ½ cup Colby Jack. Broil on top rack until cheese is browned in spots, 3 to 5 minutes. (The broiled cheese can go from golden to burnt fairly quickly, so keep a close eye on it.)

Remove from oven and let cool until the macaroni and cheese is fully set, 10 to 15 minutes. (The mixture may first appear jiggly, but it will firm up as it cools.) Serve warm.

Notes: Extra-sharp Cheddar adds tartness and a layer of Colby Jack creates a gooey, molten center. If you can’t find a Colby Jack blend, shredded mozzarella or a Mexican-style blend will work in its place.

Pressure Cooker Polenta

Ingredients
1 cup polenta rough-ground cornmeal/
4 cups Chicken Broth
Salt
3-4 teaspoons Butter
1/2 cup Mexican Blend Shredded Cheese
1/4 cup half and half

Turn Instant Pot on sauté and add the chicken broth and polenta and whisk together.

As soon as it starts to boil, place and seal the lid, and set your Instant Pot on high pressure for 7 minutes and allow it to release pressure naturally when done.

When you open the lid there will be some excess water in it. Using your whisk, blend in the butter, cheese, and half and half. The polenta will thicken as you whisk it all together. Allow it to rest for a little longer.

Pressure Cooker Polenta Cacio e Pepe

1 cup polenta (not quick-cooking)
1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more
Freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 ounces Pecorino and/or Parmesan, finely grated, plus more

Whisk polenta and 4 cups water in Instant Pot until combined. Season with 1 tsp. salt and several grinds of pepper. Bring mixture to a simmer over medium-high, whisk again, then seal pressure cooker according to manufacturer’s directions. Cook at high pressure for 9 minutes. When timer goes off, manually release pressure. Carefully open lid and whisk polenta until homogenous and creamy.

Whisk butter into polenta, then gradually add 4 oz. Pecorino, whisking until melted. Taste and season with more salt, if needed, and lots of pepper.

Transfer polenta to a wide shallow bowl. Top with more cheese and coarsely grind more pepper over.

Classic Rice Pudding

1/2 cup (100 grams) long-grain rice, preferably jasmine
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 quart (946 ml.) whole milk
1/4 to 1/3 cup (50-67 grams) sugar (to taste)
1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise, or 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

Rinse the rice under cold running water, then turn it into a medium saucepan, and cover with water. Add the salt, bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Drain.

Rinse the saucepan with cold water, shake out excess (don’t dry) and pour in the milk and sugar. If you’re using a vanilla bean, scrape the pulp into the pan and drop in the pod (if you’re using extract, you’ll add it later).

Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Stay close: Milk is notorious for bubbling over.

Lower the heat, stir in the rice and cook at a steady simmer, stirring frequently (especially at the start) for 30-40 minutes, or until the rice is very tender, the pudding feels just a little thick as you stir it and most of the milk has been absorbed (the pudding will have cooked down by about half). It’s hard to give an exact time because it depends on the rice, the size of the pan and the amount of heat beneath it.

Scrape the pudding into a heatproof bowl, and remove the vanilla bean, if you’ve used it. If you’re using extract, stir it in now.

Cover (if you want to avoid a skin, press plastic wrap against the surface of the pudding), and cool to room temperature or refrigerate. Tightly covered, the pudding will keep in the fridge for about four days; serve cold or at room temperature.

Sous Vide Soft Poached (Or Ramen) Eggs

1-16 large eggs
Salt and pepper
Directions

Using sous vide circulator, bring 4-inches water to 167°F/75°C in 7-quart Dutch oven or Lexan container. Using slotted spoon, gently lower eggs into prepared water bath, cover, and cook for 12 minutes.

Meanwhile, fill large bowl halfway with ice and water. Using slotted spoon, transfer eggs to ice bath and let sit until cool enough to handle, about 1 minute. To serve, crack eggs into individual bowls and season with salt and pepper.

Eggs can be cooked, chilled in an ice bath for 10 minutes, and refrigerated for up to five days. To reheat, lower eggs into water bath set to 140°F/60°C and cook until heated through, at least 15 minutes or up to 1 hour, then crack into bowls as directed.

Quick Dressings for Vegetables, Salads, Meat, or Fish: Southeast Asian

Simple Thai:
2 tablespoons Thai oyster sauce
1 teaspoon Thai fish sauce
1 teaspoon Thai thin soy sauce
Small pinch ground white pepper

Spicy Thai:
8 teaspoons finely minced garlic (about 8 medium cloves)
4 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
4 tablespoons fresh juice from about 4 limes
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves and fine stems
1 teaspoon chili flakes

Another Spicy Thai:
1/2 cup water boiled with 1/2 cup sugar (use to taste; you will not need all)
1 tablespoon peeled and minced fresh ginger
4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
1 teaspoon rice vinegar or white vinegar
2 teaspoons fish sauce (nam pla)
1 fresh hot red or green pepper, preferably Thai, deseeded and thinly sliced

Thai Coconut Curry:
6 tablespoons coconut milk
1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste
2 1/2 teaspoons fresh juice from 1 lime
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons Asian fish sauce
2 teaspoons honey
1 teaspoon grated fresh peeled ginger

Thai Chili Vinegar:
1 teaspoon garlic
1 tablespoon red medium-sized thai chilies
1/8 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons vinegar
1/4 teaspoon white sugar

Sweet and Tangy Thai:
10-15 dried whole red hot chillies
4-6 large cloves of garlic, chopped
1/4 cup white vinegar
Juice of 1/2 to 1 lime
3 or more tbsp fish sauce (nahm bplah), to taste
1/3 to 1/2 cup granulated sugar, to desired sweetness
A few cilantro leaves and/or a 1-inch section of green onion, chopped (optional)

Thai Tamarind:
(Bring to a boil, then simmer until sugars dissolve)
1/4 lb palm sugar, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup Thai fish sauce
1 oz seedless tamarind pulp (paste)
1 1/4 cup water
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper

Thai Yellow Bean:
2 tablespoons Thai oyster sauce
Scant tablespoon Thai fish sauce
1 teaspoon Thai yellow bean sauce
1 teaspoon granulated sugar

Thai Citrus Dressing:
1/2 cup orange juice
1/2 cup lime juice
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 tablespoon minced serrano or jalapeno
1 teaspoon minced garlic
3 tablespoons vegetable oil

Thai Gremolata:
2 small shallots, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup roasted, salted peanuts, minced
Zest of 2 limes
1/2 cup minced cilantro, packed

Vietnamese Chili Garlic:
(use raw, or simmer for five minutes)
6 ounces hot chiles (e.g., cayenne, Fresnos, habanero, jalapeno, long, serrano, Thai, or a combination of them), stemmed and chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons distilled white vinegar

Vietnamese Nuoc Cham:
3 tablespoons lime juice (1 fat, thin skin lime)
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 cup water
2 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
Optional additions:
1 small garlic clove, finely minced
1 or 2 Thai chilis, thinly sliced or 1 teaspoon homemade chili garlic sauce or store bought (tuong ot toi)

Vietnamese Ginger Lime:
Chubby 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and minced
5 tablespoons fresh lime juice (2 or 3 limes)
2 1/2 tablespoons sugar
2 to 3 tablespoons fish sauce

Vietnamese Tomato Chili:
(Warm through, purée, then strain)
1 large clove garlic
1 medium (3 to 4 ounc) Roma tomato, chopped
6 ounces Fresno or other kinds of moderately-hot chiles
Brimming 1?2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 tablespoon sugar, preferably organic
1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar
1/2 cup water, plus more as needed

Vietnamese Orange Almond:
1/4 cup water, plus more as needed
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
1/2 cup raw almond butter
1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
1 teaspoon honey or coconut nectar
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon wheat-free tamari or soy sauce
1 teaspoon roasted sesame seeds

Hmong Chili Peanut:
2 T fish sauce
juice of 1 lime
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp MSG, optional
1-2 fresh red chile peppers, minced
1/4 bunch cilantro, finely chopped
4 green onions, white and green parts
1 small tomato, chopped (or 6 cherry tomatoes or 15 grape tomatoes)u
2 T chopped raw peanuts
1 T peanut butter

Cambodian:
4 cloves garlic, chopped
4 red hot peppers, chopped
3 teaspoons roasted peanuts, coarsely chopped
2 limes, squeezed
7 tablespoons fish sauce
2 teaspoons sugar
4 tablespoons water

Isaan:
1/2 tbsp chili flakes
1 Tbsp roasted rice
1/2 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbsp lime juice
2 finely chopped coriander stalks (with leaf)
2 teaspoons of palm sugar

Nyonya:
2 tablespoon Worcestershire sacue
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons sugar
1 red holland chili,thinly sliced on the diagonal.

Hainanese:
2-inch chubby section ginger (about 2 ounces), peeled and thinly sliced
1 1/2 tablespoons peanut oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1-3 tablespoon chicken stock

Singapore Sweet Soy:
1 tablespoon light (regular) soy sauce
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
1 -1/2 teaspoons unseasoned rice vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon Asian chili sauce, such as Sriracha

Singapore Chili:
2 or 3 large red chiles, such as Fresno, cayenne, or long chile, coarsely chopped
2 or 3 hot Thai chiles, coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1-1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon hot chicken broth

Indonesian Sos Chili Padi:
5-10 small red or green Thai chilies, very thinly sliced
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 1/2 tablespoons lime juice

Indonesian Soy Lime:
3 red Holland chilies, stemmed and thinly sliced on the diagonal
4 tablespoons kecap manis
1 tablespoon lime juice

Indonesian Lemongrass Shallot:
1 meaty stalk of fresh lemongrass
2 fresh red Holland chiles or other fresh long or short hot red chiles, such as Fresno or Thai, stemmed and very finely chopped (for a milder sambal, seed the chiles)
2 shallots, peeled and very finely chopped (about 1 ounce total)
3 teaspoons peanut oil
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1/4 teaspoon salt

Javanese:
(Combine and saute in peanut oil)
5 shallots (about 3 3/4 ounces/110 grams total), coarsely chopped
3 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
12 fresh red Holland chiles or other fresh long, red chiles such as Fresno or cayenne, stemmed and coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon palm sugar, thinly sliced, or dark brown sugar (for a slightly sweeter sambal, increase the sugar by 1 teaspoon)
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Mee Goreng:
3 tablespoons kecap manis
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon sesame or shallot oil
1-2 teaspoons chili sauce
1/4 teaspoon white pepper

Chili Ginger Sambal:
12 red serrano chiles, trimmed and blanched 1 minute
1 shallot, peeled and chopped
2 tbsp. peeled, chopped ginger
5 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. fresh lime juice
1 tsp. rice vinegar
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt

Chili Tomato Sambal:
6 hot red chilies, seeded and chopped
1 onion, roughly chopped
3 tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and roughly chopped
1 tablespoon finely grated gingerroot
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
grated peel and jice of 1 lime
salt and pepper to taste

Sweet and Sour Chili:
4 fresh Holland chilies
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon palm, cider, or rice vinegar
4 tablespoon warm water
1 clove garlic, thinly sliced lengthwise

Clotilde’s Magic Sauce:
2 tablespoons sesame oil
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice (lemon juice may be substituted, but lime is better)
2 tablespoons fish sauce, a.k.a. nuoc mam or nam pla in its respective Vietnamese and Thai incarnations (look for it at Asian markets)
Optional additions:
2 tablespoons all-natural smooth peanut butter
chili sauce, to taste
one clove garlic, finely minced or pressed

Spicy Tamarind Sauce:
3 ounces tamarind pulp (3-by-3-by-3/4- inch block) and 1-1/4 cups water, processed
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons sriracha, or to taste
5 cloves garlic, grated
1/4 teaspoon MSG (optional)
2 teaspoons fish sauce, or to taste
4 teaspoons sugar, or to taste

Turmeric Ginger:
5 fresh turmeric fingers (about 3 ounces)
2 teaspoons minced or grated ginger (about 1 inch piece)
1 chili, such as a serrano or jalapeño, seeded and diced tiny
1/2 teaspoon salt
Juice of 1 or 2 limes
Good olive oil, if needed
Sugar, if needed

Basil Peanut:
3 cups firmly packed fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped
3/4 cup unsalted roasted peanuts, coarsely chopped
1 serrano pepper, seeded and minced
1 garlic clove, minced
1 bunch green onions (green parts only), thinly sliced
2 tablespoons fish sauce or 1 tsp. anchovy paste
1/8 teaspoon sesame oil
3 to 4 Tbsp. olive oil

Coriander Peanut:
2 cups coarsely chopped coriander leaves and stems (about 1 large bunch)
3 to 5 green cayenne chiles, or substitute serrano chiles, seeded
2 tablespoons boiled skinned peanuts (see Glossary), or substitute unsalted roasted peanuts
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
About 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
About 1/4 teaspoon salt

Crispy Coconut:
(Toss together and dry roast)
10 oz grated white coconut
2 duan salam leaves
1 kaffir lime leaf
1- inch galangal (bruised)
1 Tbsp sugar
Paste of 2 shallots, 1 clove garlic, 1/4 tsp turmeric powder, and 1/2 Tbsp coriander seeds

Lime Sauce:
2 garlic cloves
4 green chilies, seeded
3 tablespoons fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
3 tablespoons sugar
juice of 1 lime

Ginger Scallion:
one bunch scallions
one knob fresh ginger, about 2 1/2 ounces
2 tablespoons neutral-flavored vegetable oil
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sherry vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Scallion Ginger:
1 tablespoon peeled and minced ginger
1/2 cup neutral oil, like canola or grape seed
1/4 cup trimmed scallions, white and green parts combined, chopped into 1/4-inch pieces
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons good soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Ginger Coconut:
1 cup coconut milk
2 tbsp fresh lime juice
2 tsp garlic oil
1 seeded and minced Serrano pepper
1 thinly sliced scallion
1 tbsp thinly sliced mint
2-3 tbsp of grated ginger
1/4 tsp salt
dash of red pepper

Spicy Lemon Coconut:
1 clove garlic, peeled
1 medium jalapeno (or serrano) chile, deseeded and chopped
1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt, plus more to taste
1 tablespoons sunflower oil
1 small bunch of scallions, thinly sliced (~8 scallions)
1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro
1 14-ounce can of coconut milk (full fat)
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice, plus more to taste

Quick Dressings for Vegetables, Salads, Meat, or Fish: Other Asian

Simple Chinese Sauce:
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup rice vinegar
1 tablespoon Chinese chile garlic sauce
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Perfect Chinese Sauce:
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon hot water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon chili oilh
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

Supreme Soy:
2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon vegetable or canola oil
1 teaspoon oyster sauce

Simple Soy:
1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1/2 cup no-salt-added vegetable broth
1 tablespoon honey or agave nectar
1 teaspoon vinegar
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced

3-2-1 Sauce:
3 Tbsp soy sauce
2 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 Tbsp sesame oil

Ginger Scallion:
one bunch scallions
one knob fresh ginger, about 2 1/2 ounces
2 tablespoons neutral-flavored vegetable oil
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sherry vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Scallion Ginger:
1 tablespoon peeled and minced ginger
1/2 cup neutral oil, like canola or grape seed
1/4 cup trimmed scallions, white and green parts combined, chopped into 1/4-inch pieces
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons good soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Odd Flavor Sauce:
3 T soy sauce
2 T tahini or almond or peanut butter
1 T Chinkiang vinegar (preferable!) or red-wine vinegar
1 T sesame oil
2 t sugar
1/4 t kosher salt
Heat through and add:
3 T neutral oil
1 small scallion, finely chopped (about 1 T)
1 T minced fresh ginger
1 large garlic clove, finely chopped (about 1 t)
1/2 t chili flakes (or more to taste)
1/2 t crushed Sichuan peppercorns

Sesame Ginger:
Grated zest of 1 lemon
Fresh ginger, cut into a 1-inch cube, peeled, and grated
1 tablespoon honey
3/4 teaspoon cayenne
3/4 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/4 cup unseasoned brown-rice vinegar
1/3 cup shoyu sauce (wheat-free soy sauce)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

Sesame Ginger Vinaigrette:
1 garlic clove, finely minced or pureed
1 teaspoon finely minced ginger
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon brown sugar or agave nectar
5 tablespoons canola oil or light sesame oil
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

Ponzu Ginger:
8 tablespoons ponzu sauce
4 tablespoons thinly sliced scallions
4 teaspoons grated fresh peeled ginger
4 teaspoons mirin
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Tonkatsu:
1 Tbsp. ketchup
2 1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce (or Usutah So-su)
1 1/2 tsp. oyster sauce
1 1/8 tsp. sugar

Japanese Carrot Ginger:
1 carrot (65 grams), roughly chopped
1/2 small onion (35 grams)
1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger, to taste
1/4 cup rice vinegar (unseasoned)
2 tablespoons neutral vegetable oil
1 tablespoon (scant) sugar
2 teaspoons white or yellow miso
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
Salt, to taste

Miso Carrot Ginger:
1/4 cup peanut or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn
1/4 cup rice vinegar
3 tablespoons white miso, sold at Asian markets and specialty stores
1 tablespoon dark sesame oil
2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into big pieces
1 inch-long piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into coins
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Carrot Ginger Coconut:
1/3 cup full-fat coconut milk
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric, or more to taste
5 tablespoons peeled ginger, chopped to measure
3 medium carrots, scrubbed
1/2 of a serrano pepper, stemmed, or to taste
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon miso (optional)
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/4 cup / 60 ml brown rice vinegar
4 medium shallots, peeled (or less if your shallots are strong

Miso Citrus:
2 teaspoons miso paste
Juice of one lime or lemon, or half an orange

Rhubarb Ginger Tahini:
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1-2 tablespoons (or more;) Brooklyn Delhi Rhubarb Ginger Achaar
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
1/3 cup soy sauce or tamari
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons pure sesame oil
1 tablespoon tahini paste

Spiced Yogurt:
1/4 tsp coriander seeds, toasted and ground
1/4 tsp cumin seeds, toasted and ground
1 cup Greek-style yogurt
2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 tsp white wine vinegar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Kosher salt
3 Tbsp water, or as needed

Tamarind:
2 teaspoons tamarind concentrate
1/2 teaspoon fresh lime juice
3 teaspoons dark brown sugar or jaggery crushed
1/4 teaspoon toasted coriander powder, freshly ground (see notes above)
100mL cup water
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Date Tamarind:
(Boil, then puree)
2 cups water
1 cup soft pitted dates
1/4 cup tamarind
1/4 cup jaggery sugar
salt, to taste