Lemon Souffle

About 1 teaspoon unsalted butter for the dish
1 cup sugar, plus some for the dish
6 eggs, separated
1 tablespoon minced or grated lemon or orange zest
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon or orange juice or Grand Marnier or other orange-flavored liqueur
Pinch salt

Butter a 2-quart soufflé or other deep baking dish. Sprinkle the dish with sugar, invert it, and tap to remove excess sugar. Set aside and heat the oven to 350 degrees.

Whisk the egg yolks with 3/4 cup of the sugar until light and very thick; the mixture will fall in a ribbon from the ends of the beaters when it is ready. Beat in the flavorings and set aside.

Beat the egg whites with the salt until they hold soft peaks; continue to beat, gradually adding the remaining 1/4 cup sugar, until they are very stiff but still glossy. Stir a good spoonful of them thoroughly into the egg yolk mixture to lighten it, then fold in the remaining whites, using a rubber spatula or your hand.

Transfer to the prepared soufflé dish(es) and bake until the center is nearly set, 25 to 35 minutes (15 to 25 minutes for individual soufflés). Serve immediately.

Burmese Red Chili Oil

1 cup packed dried red chiles, soaked in lukewarm water for 20 minutes
1 cup peanut oil

Drain the chiles and remove and discard the stems. Put the chiles in a food processor and process to a coarse paste.

Pour the oil into a nonreactive pan and set over medium heat. Add the chile paste and bring to a bubbling boil, then remove from the heat and let stand until cooled to room temperature.

You can store the oil with the chiles in it, but in Burma the oil often is served on its own. For clear oil, drain the oil through a sieve into a clean, dry glass jar and seal with the lid. Store away from heat and light. You can keep the chiles in another glass jar for a spicy condiment, or discard them.

Indian Onion Masala

1/4 cup peanut oil (or other high smoke point )
2 cups onion, diced
1 cup tomatoes, chopped
8-10 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced ginger minced
1 green Serrano , jalapeño or thai chile minced (optional)
1 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
2 teaspoon garam masala
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup water

Turn your Instant Pot onto Sauté on high. When the display reads HOT, add oil.

When the oil is hot and shimmering, add in the ginger, garlic and green chili and sauté for 1-2 minutes.

Add in the onion and mix well. You’re going to sauté this for 10 minutes, stirring once or twice.

Add all the dry spices and mix well, being careful not to let them burn. Be sure to put the spices on top of the veggies rather than on the surface of the pan directly.

Add tomatoes and the water and deglaze your pot well, scraping up all the brown bits.

Close and cook at High Pressure for 15 minutes, allowing it to release pressure naturally.

Open up the pot and if it’s too watery, just sauté for bit it will thicken as it cools.

You’re now ready to cook with this immediately, put some in the fridge for a week or so, or in the freezer for several months (use 1-cup containers). This recipe made about 2.5 cups.

Punjabi Garam Masala

1 tablespoon coriander seeds
2 teaspoons cumin seeds
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
3 cinnamon sticks broken up
3 bay leaves broken up

Place a small skillet over medium heat and add all the ingredients. Toast them until they’re fragrant but not browned, about 2 to 3 minutes. They will continue to cook for a while after you take them out of the pan, so if you’re in doubt, undercook them.

Transfer the spices to a plate or a paper towel to cool completely. Once cool, place the spices in a coffee or spice grinder. Grind until the spices form a medium-fine powder.
Stop the grinder several times and shake it so all the spices get under the blades and grind more evenly. When you’re finished, unplug the grinder. Holding the lid in place, turn the grinder upside down and shake the spice mixture into the lid.
Pour the garam masala into a small jar with a tight-fitting lid. Store in a cool, dry place for 3 to 4 weeks.

Sichuan Chili Oil

1 1/2 cups oil (ideally a vegetable, peanut, or grapeseed oil)
5 star anise
1 cinnamon stick, preferably cassia cinnamon
2 bay leaves
3 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns
3/4 cup Asian crushed red pepper flakes (Sichuan chili flakes are the best)
1 – 1½ teaspoons salt (to taste)

Heat the oil, star anise, cinnamon stick, bay leaves, and Sichuan peppercorns in a small saucepan over medium high heat. When the oil starts to bubble slightly, turn the heat down to medium.

Let the oil cook for 30 minutes like this. If you start to see that slight bubbling die down, periodically turn the heat back up to medium-high, then back down to medium if it gets too hot.
When the oil is done cooking, the seeds and pods should be darker in color, but not blackened (that means they burned, which results in subpar chili oil). Let the oil cool for 5 minutes. In a separate heat-proof bowl, measure out the crushed red pepper flakes and salt.

Remove the aromatics from the oil using a fine mesh strainer. Slowly pour the oil over the chili flakes, and stir well. When completely cooled, transfer to a jar, and store in the refrigerator. The oil will keep for up to 6 months when stored this way (always remember to use a clean spoon to dip into the jar!)

Basic Sous Vide Steaks

2 (1 1/2- to 2-inch thick) ribeye, strip, porterhouse or t-bone (about 1 pound each), or 4 tenderloin steaks (6 to 8 ounces each)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 sprigs thyme or rosemary (optional)
2 garlic cloves (optional)
2 shallots, thinly sliced (optional)
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons butter

Preheat a sous-vide cooker to desired final temperature according to charts above. Season steaks generously with salt and pepper. Place in sous-vide bags along with herbs, garlic, and shallots (if using) and distribute evenly. Seal bags and place in water bath for time according to charts below.

For Strip, Ribeye, Porterhouse/T-Bone, and Butcher’s Cuts:

–Very Rare to Rare, use 120°F (49°C) to 128°F (53°C) for 1 to 2 1/2 hours
–Medium-rare, use 129°F (54°C) to 134°F (57°C) for 1 to 4 hours (2 1/2 hours max if under 130°F/54°C)
–Medium, use 135°F (57°C) to 144°F (62°C) for 1 to 4 hours
–Medium-well, use 145°F (63°C) to 155°F (68°C) for 1 to 3 1/2 hours
–Well done, use 156°F (69°C) and up for 1 to 3 hours

To finish in a pan: Turn on your vents and open your windows. Remove steak from water bath and bag and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Place a heavy cast iron or stainless steel skillet with vegetable, canola, or rice bran oil over the hottest burner you have and preheat the skillet until it starts to smoke. Gently lay the steak in the skillet using your fingers or a set of tongs. If desired, add a tablespoon of butter. For a cleaner-tasting sear, omit the butter at this stage. After 15 to 30 seconds, flip the steak so that the second side comes into contact with the pan. Repeat, flipping the steak every 15 to 30 seconds until it has developed a nice brown sear, about a minute and a half total. If you did not add butter earlier, add butter to the skillet about 30 seconds before the steak is done for added richness. Serve steak immediately.

To finish on the grill: Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Alternatively, set half the burners on a gas grill to the highest heat setting, cover, and preheat for 10 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Remove steak from water bath and bag and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Place steak directly over the hot side of the grill and cook, turning every 15 to 30 seconds, until a deep, rich crust has formed, about 1 1/2 minutes total. If the fire threatens to flare up as the steak drips fat into it, suffocate the fire by closing the grill lid until the flames die out. Alternatively, transfer the steak to the cooler side of the grill using a set of long tongs until the flames subside. Do not allow the steak to get engulfed in flames. Transfer the cooked steak to a cutting board or serving platter and serve immediately.

Basic Sous Vide Chicken Breasts

2 bone-in, skin-on chicken breast halves
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 sprigs thyme or rosemary (optional)

Preheat a water bath to desired final temperature using a sous-vide cooker, according to the chart above. Season chicken generously with salt and pepper. Place chicken in zipper-lock bags or vacuum bags and add thyme or rosemary sprigs, if using.

If Using Zipper-Lock Bags: Remove air from zipper-lock bags by closing the bags, leaving the last inch of the top unsealed. Slowly lower into the preheated water bath, sealing the bag completely just before it fully submerges. If Using Vacuum Bags: Seal according to manufacturer’s instructions. Add bagged chicken to preheated water bath and cook according to the chart below:

–Tender and juicy for cold chicken salad, use 150°F (66°C) for 1 to 4 hours
–Very soft and juicy, served hot, use 140°F (60°C) for 1 1/2 to 4 hours
–Juicy, tender, and slightly stringy, served hot use 150°F (66°C) for 1 to 4 hours
Traditional, juicy, firm, and slightly stringy, served hot, use
160°F (71°C) for 1 to 4 hours

To Finish in a Pan: Turn on your vents and open your windows. Remove chicken from water bath and bag. Discard herbs, if using. Carefully pat chicken dry with paper towels. Heat the oil in a heavy cast iron or stainless steel skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Gently lay the chicken in the skillet, skin side down, using your fingers or a set of tongs. Hold the chicken down flat in the pan with a flexible metal spatula or your fingers (be careful of splattering oil). Cook until golden brown and crisp, about 2 minutes. Remove from pan and let rest until cool enough to handle, about 2 minutes. Remove bones with your fingertips. Slice chicken and serve.

To Finish on the Grill: Light one half chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill, and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Alternatively, set half the burners on a gas grill to medium-high heat setting, cover, and preheat for 10 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Remove chicken from water bath and bag. Discard herbs, if using. Carefully pat chicken dry with paper towels. Gently lay the chicken on the hot side of the grill, skin side down. Cook until nicely marked, about 2 minutes. Rotate 90 degrees and cook until chicken is marked again and skin is crisp, about 1 1/2 minutes longer. Remove from grill and let rest until cool enough to handle, about 2 minutes. Remove bones with your fingertips. Slice chicken and serve.

Pressure Cooker Basics: Stock

The Breville preset is 60 minutes, 12 psi, natural release.

To make a brown stock, use the sear setting to brown bone and vegetables prior to pressure or slow cooking.

Vegetables such as onions, carrots, and celery should be cut into large pieces. This will help keep the stock clear and make it easier to strain.

To shorten cooking time, add cold water to bowl while still in the sear mode and allow the water to come to a simmer before pressure cooking.

Beef Stock:

2 tablespoons olive oil
3 pounds beef bones
2 teaspoons tomato paste
1 large onion, unpeeled, quartered
1 carrot, roughly chopped
1 stalk celery, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, unpeeled
12 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh thyme
2.5 quarts cold water

Use the sear feature to preheat the cooking bowl. Heat olive oil until shimmering, the, working in batches, brown the bones on all sides, 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside.

Add tomato paste, onions, carrots, and celery and stir to coat. Cook until browned, 5-7 minutes.

Return bones and any accumulated juices to the cooking bowl. Add remaining ingredients.

Use the pressure cook setting to cook. When cooking has completed, let stock cool, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.

Chicken Stock:

3 pounds chicken bones or pieces
1 large onion, peeled and quartered
2 carrots, roughly chopped
2 stalks celery, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, unpeeled
10 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh thyme
5 sprigs flat parsley
2.5 quarts cold water

Add all ingredients to cooking bowl.

Use the pressure cook setting to cook. When cooking has completed, let stock cook, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.

Vegetable Stock:

2 large onions, unpeeled, halved
4 stalks celery cut into 1-inch pieces
2 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
8 ounces crimini or button mushrooms, halved
1 head garlic, halved crosswise
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh thyme
6 sprigs flat parsley
2.5 quarts cold water

Add all ingredients to cooking bowl.

Use the pressure cook setting to cook. When cooking has completed, let stock cook, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.

Seafood Stock:

1 tablespoon olive oil
1.5 – 2 pounds fish heads, cones, shrimp shells, etc., rinsed
1/4 fennel stalks, chopped
1 small leek, white and light green parts, washed and chopped
2 sprigs fresh thyme
4 sprigs flat parsley
1/4 cup white wine
2.5 quarts cold water

Use the sear feature to heat the cooking bowl. Heat the olive oil until shimmering, then add the bones and cook until opaque but not brown, 2-4 minutes.

Select the pressure cook feature, then adjust the cooking time to 10 minutes. When cooking has completed, let stock cook, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.

Pressure Cooker Basics: Risotto

The Breville preset for risotto is 6 minutes, 6.0 psi, auto quick release.

Use the sauce setting soften aromatics and deglaze the bowl with wine.

The key to creamy risotto is tasting the rice grains before the liquid is added. Use the sauce setting to toast the rice, stirring frequently for 3-5 minutes or until the edges become transparent and turn white.

Since the liquid will not evaporate during cooking, keep the ratio to 1 part rice and 3 parts stock. If using a lot of vegetables, reduce stock by a third.

Risotto Milanese:

1 tablespoon olive oil
4 tablespoons butter, divided
1 medium shallot, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups Arborio rice
1/2 cup dry white wine
4 cups chicken stock
1 cup water
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads
1/2 cup finely grated parmesan cheese, plus extra for serving
salt and pepper to taste

Select the sauce feature, medium heat, and preheat the cooking bowl. Add olive oil, 2 tablespoons of butter, and shallot, and cook until soft, 3-5 minutes.

Bring stock and water to boil in saucepan.

Stir in wine and cook until reduced by half. Stir in 3 cups of hot stock mixture, 1 teaspoon of salt, and saffron threads.

Select the pressure cook risotto feature.

When cooking has completed, return remaining stock mixture to a boil. Stir through 1 cup of hot liquid, parmesan cheese, and 2 tablespoons butter. Adjust consistency as needed with stock, season with salt and pepper, and serve immediately with parmesan cheese.

Pressure Cooker Basics: Rice

The Breville preset for rice is 5 minutes, 7.5 psi, auto pulse release. Increase it to 20 minutes for brown rice.

Use a ratio of 1 part rice to 1.25 parts water for white rice and 1 part rice to 1.5 water for brown rice.

White:

2 cups rice: 2.5 cups water
3 cups rice: 3.75 cups water
4 cups rice: 5 cups water

Brown:

2 cups rice: 3 cups water
3 cups rice: 4.5 cups water
4 cups rice: 6 cups water

After cooking, allow rice to stand in bowl for 5 minutes before stirring and serving.

Caramel Sauce

1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/3 cup water
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Put the cream in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Set aside.

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan and bring to the boil.
Use a brush dipped in cold water and brush the inside of the saucepan, brushing just about the level of the simmering sauce.

Cook over high heat until the mixture is golden brown.

Remove from the heat and slowly whisk in the reserved cream.

Return to the boil and cook over low heat for two to three minutes.

Stir in the vanilla.

Chocolate Ganache

14 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, broken into pieces
3 tablespoons espresso, strong coffee or water
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup sugar (confectioners’, granulated or light brown)
3/4 cup heavy cream, preferably not ultrapasteurized
1 pinch coarse salt, more to taste

In a heavy saucepan, combine all ingredients and melt together over very low heat, stirring. (Alternatively, combine in a bowl and microwave at low heat for 2 minutes. Stir. Continue cooking in 30-second blasts, stirring in-between.)

Just before all the chocolate is melted, remove from heat and stir until chocolate melts and mixture comes together. It may appear curdled, but keep stirring or whisk vigorously; it will smooth out. If too thick to pour, whisk in hot water a tablespoon at a time. Taste for salt and adjust the seasoning.

When ganache is hot and pourable, it’s a classic companion to ice cream.

Warm, you can pour or pipe it over a cake, cupcakes or cookies; it will set to a soft, rich glaze.

Let it cool to room temperature and whip it in a mixer to make a fluffy frosting.

Or chill it, then roll into balls and dust with cocoa powder to make truffles.

This sauce has a slightly more adult flavor than the ice-cream-parlor standard; coffee will do that to a dessert. Leave it out if you prefer. Also note that bittersweet chocolate will deliver a stronger, sharper chocolate taste than semi-sweet.

Refrigerate leftovers in a jar; it will keep indefinitely. To rewarm, place the jar in a saucepan half-filled with simmering water, or uncover and heat in microwave at low heat.

Magic Shell

7 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons virgin coconut oil

Melt the chocolate in a small metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water.

Stir in the coconut oil and heat until dissolved, about 1 minute.

Keep the liquid lukewarm until ready to pour over the ice cream.

Chocolate will harden into a shell within a few seconds when spooned over ice cream.

Pressure Cooker Bone Broth or Stock

3 pounds bones, preferably a mix of meaty bones and marrow-filled bones
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 ½ tablespoons coarse sea salt, or to taste
1 to 2 celery stalks
1 large carrot
1 large onion, 2 leeks, or a bunch of leek greens
1 whole clove or star anise pod
2 to 6 garlic cloves
5 to 7 sprigs fresh thyme or dill
5 to 7 sprigs fresh parsley
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
2 to 4 1-inch-thick coins peeled fresh ginger (optional)

If you want to roast the bones first, heat the oven to 450ºF. Lay the bones out on a rimmed baking sheet and roast until well browned, 25 to 35 minutes.

Put the bones (roasted or not) in the pressure cooker pot and add all the remaining ingredients. Cover with 3 to 3 1/2 quarts of water (the water shouldn’t come more than two-thirds of the way up the side of the pot).

To make regular stock, cook on high pressure for 1 hour if using all chicken or poultry bones, or 2 hours for beef or pork bones or a combination of poultry and meat.

For bone broth, cook on high pressure for 3 hours for poultry bones, and 4 1/2 hours for beef, pork, or mixed bones. When making bone broth, you’ll know you’ve cooked it long enough if all the connective tissue, tendons, and cartilage have dissolved and the bones crumble a bit when you poke at them. If this hasn’t happened, cook it on high pressure for another 30 minutes and check it again.

Allow the pressure to release naturally. Use the broth or stock right away, or store it in the refrigerator or freezer. Bone broth and regular stock will keep for 5 days refrigerated or up to 6 months frozen.

Stir Fry Sauce

1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1/2 cup no-salt-added vegetable broth
1 tablespoon honey or agave nectar
1 teaspoon vinegar
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced

Combine the soy sauce, broth, honey or agave nectar, vinegar, ginger and garlic in a mason jar. Seal and shake well, until incorporated. Use right away, or refrigerate for up to 4 weeks.

This is a great sauce to have in your repertoire when you need to pull together a fast meal out of whatever’s in the refrigerator. Toss it with leftover rice or noodles, vegetables and any kind of protein for an impromptu dish of fried rice or lo mein, or use it as a marinade for chicken, beef or tofu.

Add a squirt of lime juice and Sriracha to give it a Thai-inspired flavor, or substitute it for that packet of dried seasoning the next time you mix up a late-night bowl of ramen.

Pimento Cheese

8 ounces extra-sharp cheddar cheese, grated with a food processor or hand grater (not pre-grated)
1/4 cup softened cream cheese (2 ounces), pulled into several pieces
Scant 1/2 cup jarred pimento or other roasted red peppers (from a 7-ounce jar), finely diced
3 tablespoons Duke’s, Hellmann’s or other high-quality store-bought mayonnaise
1/2 teaspoon dried red chile flakes
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

In a large mixing bowl, place the cheddar cheese in an even layer. Scatter the cream cheese, pimentos, mayonnaise and chile flakes over the cheddar cheese. Using a spatula, mix the pimento cheese until it is smooth and spreadable, about 1 1/2 minutes.

Transfer the pimento cheese to a plastic container or bowl, cover tightly, and store in the refrigerator. Pimento cheese keeps in the refrigerator for 1 week.

Roast Beef for Sandwiches

2 small garlic cloves, grated
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons rosemary leaves
2 1/2 pounds boneless beef top loin (top sirloin) roast (leave the fat on top)
Extra-virgin olive oil, as needed

In a small bowl, stir together the garlic, salt, pepper and rosemary. Spread the paste all over the meat. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight.

When you are ready to prepare the meat, remove it from the fridge and let stand at room temperature for 30 to 60 minutes.
Heat oven to 325 degrees. Place a wire rack in a rimmed baking sheet.

Coat the roast lightly with olive oil. Transfer to the wire rack and roast for 75 to 95 minutes, until an instant thermometer inserted into the center of the roast registers 125 to 130 degrees for medium-rare.

Transfer the meat to a cutting board and let cool completely before carving (trim off the fat cap if you plan to serve it cold). The meat can be roasted three days ahead; cool completely before refrigerating.

Pan-fried Noodles

1 package Hong Kong Style Pan-Fried Noodles (the kind they have at Wegman’s)
Soy sauce
Sesame oil
Lao Gan Ma spicy black bean sauce
Vegetable oil, for cooking

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Drop in the noodles and boil for one minute. Drain.

Heat a couple tablespoons of vegetable oil in a non-stick pan over medium-high heat. Take about a quarter of the noodles and spread them evenly in the pan.

Let them cook until golden brown on both sides. Slide onto a serving plate and toss with about two teaspoons of soy sauce, a teaspoon of sesame oil, and some hot sauce.

Supreme Soy Sauce

2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon vegetable or canola oil
1 teaspoon oyster sauce

Put everything in a small saucepan over medium heat.

Stir to dissolve the sugar. Once the sauce starts to boil, turn off the heat, and it’s done.

Let it cool completely before storing it in an air-tight container.

Guide to Beans and Dal

Channa are chickpeas.
Channa dal are split chickpeas.
Chana dal, toor dal, and split yellow peas can be used interchangeably. Toor dal will cook faster than the others.

Matar are green peas.
Matar dal are split green peas.

Masoor are brown lentils with yellow insides.
Masoor dal are split and skinned masoor and are what we typically call red lentils.
Masoor dal and mung dal can be used interchangeably. Mung Dal will take a few minutes longer to cook through.

Mung are dark green beans with pale yellow insides.
Mung dal are split and skinned mung and are pale yellow. They are sold as petite yellow lentils.
Mung dal and masoor dal can be used interchangeably. Mung Dal will take a few minutes longer to cook through.

Toor or toovar are pigeopn peas. They are beige with yellow insides.
Toor or toovar dal are split and are yellow.
Toor dal, channa dal, and split yellow peas can be used interchangeably. Toor dal will cook faster than the others.

Urad are whole black lentils with pale yellow insides.
Urad dal chilka are split urad with the skin on, so they are black amd yellow.
Urad dal are split and skinned urad and are pale yellow.