Classic Pizzelles

3 large eggs
3/4 cup sugar
3/8 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 3/4 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup (8 tablespoons) melted butter

Beat the eggs, sugar, salt, and vanilla until well combined.

Stir in the flour and baking powder, mixing until smooth.

Add the melted butter, again mixing until smooth; the batter will be thick and soft.

Heat your pizzelle iron. Grease it as directed in the manufacturer’s instructions. As the iron heats, the batter will stiffen.

Cook the pizzelle according to the instructions that came with your iron. In general, they’ll take between 45 seconds and 2 1/2 minutes to brown.

Remove the pizzelle from the iron, and cool on a rack. If desired, use a pair of scissors to trim any ragged edges.

Dust cooled pizzelle with confectioners’ sugar, if desired.

Roasted Vegetable Basics

Broccoli:

2 large heads of broccoli, cut into large florets with some stalk attached
5 tablespoons olive oil
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Preheat oven to 450°. Toss broccoli and oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast, tossing occasionally, until tender and browned, 25–35 minutes.

Brussels Sprouts:

3 pounds brussels sprouts, trimmed, halved, quartered if large
5 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 450°. Toss brussels sprouts, oil, salt, and pepper on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast, tossing occasionally, until tender and browned, 35–45 minutes.

Butternut Squash:

1 large butternut squash, peeled, seeded, cut into 1½-inch pieces
1/4 cup olive oil
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Preheat oven to 450°. Toss squash and oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast, tossing occasionally, until tender and browned, 35–45 minutes.

Carrots:
3 pounds carrots, peeled, cut into 3-inch pieces, halved lengthwised, quartered if large
1/4 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 450°. Toss carrots, oil, salt, and pepper on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast, tossing occasionally, until tender and browned, 35–45 minutes.

Cauliflower:

2 medium heads of cauliflower, cut into large florets with some stalk attached
5 tablespoons olive oil
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Preheat oven to 450°. Toss cauliflower and oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast, tossing occasionally, until tender and browned, 25–35 minutes.

Sweet Potatoes:

3 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled, cut into 1½-inch pieces
1/4 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Add appropriate combinations of following flavorings (choose 1 from each category, or maybe two finishes):

Aromatics
Ginger (grated): 1 Tbsp.
Garlic: 2-4 cloves grated or whole-roasted then smashed
Shallots: 2-4 shallots quartered
Onion: small, quartered
Leek: white and light green parts only, thinly sliced

Oils (use amountsin recipes)
Olive, vegetable, chicken fat, bacon fat, coconut

Herbs
Thyme, sage, rosemary, bay
1-2 tsp. chopped
1-2 bay leaves

Spices
Warming spices (cinnamon, allspice, cloves): 1/4 to 1/2 tsp.
Chile flake: 1/2 to 1 tsp.
Chili powder, paprika, and curry: 1-3 tsp.

Finishes (These go on after the veg is out of the oven.)
Oil drizzle (olive, pumpkin, walnut): 1-2 Tbsp.
Crunchy (toasted bread crumbs, seeds, fried onions or shallots) 1/4 – 1/2 cup
Spicy drizzle (tabasco, sriracha, sambal)
Sweets (dark brown sugar, maple, honey): 2-4 tsp
Meats (bacon, chorizo, sausage): 1/4 – 1/2 pound
Soy and fish sauce: 1-2 tsp.
Fresh herbs (tarragon, chives, parsley, mint, cilantro): 1/4 cup
Sour (citrus, malt vinegar, cider vinegar, wine vinegar, sherry vinegar): drizzle

Red Chile Hot Sauce

20 red Fresno chiles, seeds removed
8 red habanero chiles, seeds removed
1 small garlic clove, finely grated
2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more for seasoning
1 cup white distilled vinegar

Pulse Fresno and habanero chiles, garlic, and 2 Tbsp. salt in a food processor until very finely chopped. Transfer to a small bowl; cover and let sit at least 2 hours and up to 12 hours (this will both develop the chile flavor and soften the flesh, resulting in a smooth flavorful sauce when puréed).

Purée chile mixture and vinegar in a blender until smooth. Season with salt.

Do Ahead: Sauce can be made 2 months ahead. Cover and chill.

Cheesy Grits

1 1/2 cups grits (not instant)
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter
6 ounces sharp white Cheddar, shredded
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Hot pepper sauce

Bring 4 cups water to a boil. Gradually whisk in grits and bring to a boil, whisking constantly. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until grits are tender and resemble a porridge, 15–20 minutes. Stir in butter and cheese until melted. Season with salt, pepper, and hot pepper sauce.

Basque Mixture

1/4 cup Armagnac
2 tablespoons orange flower water
2 tablespoons anisette
2 tablespoons dark rum
1 teaspoon almond extract
1 strip of lemon or orange zest, 1 inch long by 1/4 inche wide

Mix in a clean jar and keep in a cool cupboard or refrigerator.

Variation:

3 ounces orange flower water
3 tablespoons dark rum
1 tablespoon Armagnac
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon anise extract
1 teaspoon lemon extract

Perfect Carolina Gold Rice

4 cups water
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup Carolina Gold Rice
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cubed

Preheat the oven to 300°F.

Bring the water and salt to a boil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, add the rice, stir once, and bring to a simmer. Simmer gently, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the rice is al dente, about 15 minutes.

Drain the rice in a sieve and rinse under cold water.

Spread the rice out on a rimmed baking sheet. Dry the rice in the oven, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes.

Scatter the butter evenly over the rice and continue to dry it, stirring every few minutes, for about 5 minutes longer. All excess moisture should have evaporated and the grains should be dry and separate.

Mashed Potatoes

5 pounds Yukon Gold or Russet potatoes, well-scrubbed
2 sticks (8 ounces) unsalted butter
2 cups half-and-half
3 tablespoons kosher salt, divided
Finely chopped fresh chives (optional)
Freshly ground black pepper (optional)
Additional pat of butter (optional)

Boil the potatoes. Place the potatoes in a large pot and add cold water to cover then by about 1 inch. Stir in 2 tablespoons of salt. Cover and bring to a gentle boil over medium-high heat. Uncover and reduce the heat as needed to maintain a gentle simmer. Test for doneness at 30 minutes. A sharp knife should easily go through the potato. Larger potatoes may take longer, up to 45 or 50 minutes total.

Heat the butter and half-and-half and add salt. About 20 minutes into the potato cooking time, melt the butter over low heat in a small saucepan. Heat the half-and half and remaining 1 tablespoon salt over low heat in another small saucepan. Keep both warm.

Drain the potatoes. When the potatoes are ready, drain them in a colander. Turn off the heat on the butter and half-and-half.

Mash the potatoes. If using a potato masher or ricer, peel the potatoes — you can pick each one up with a pot holder and peel with a paring knife. If using a food mill, don’t peel the potatoes. In either case, the mash, rice, or process the potatoes back into the pot they were cooked in. This will cut down on extra dishes and help the potatoes stay warm from the pot’s residual heat.

Add the dairy. Add the hot butter to the potatoes, gently stirring with a wooden spoon or spatula to incorporate. When all the butter is absorbed, add the hot half-and-half. It will seem soupy at first, but the potatoes will gradually absorb the liquid and turn into a creamy mixture.

Taste, garnish, and serve. Taste your potatoes and add more salt as needed. This is also a good time to add pepper if using. Spoon into your serving dish and top with optional garnishes, such as a pat of butter or some chopped chives.

Notes

Make ahead: You can make your potatoes in advance of serving. If it’s just an hour or so, leave them in the pot you mashed them in and don’t garnish yet. Place the pot in a large pan of gently simmering water to keep warm. If they’ve been refrigerated, the best way to reheat them is to place them in a low oven, covered, for 20 to 30 minutes. Reheated mashed potatoes are often drier and may need additional (warmed!) dairy to bring them back to their creaminess. This post has some great tips on reheating mashed potatoes.

Storage: Leftover mashed potatoes can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Electric mixers: Some people get away with using a stand mixer or hand-held beaters. Just be very careful and don’t let it rip or you will end up with the unhappiness of gluey potatoes. Stick to low speed.

Additions: Cream cheese, sour cream, and yogurt are a popular additions to mashed potatoes. They all add a nice dairy tang and contribute to a creamy texture. Feel free to substitute some or all of the half-and-half with either of these ingredients if you like a little tanginess in your mashed p

Shortbread

3/ 4 cup butter, at room temperature
1/ 2 cup powdered sugar
1/ 2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/ 2 cups flour

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease pan lightly.

Cream butter until it’s light.

Beat in the powdered sugar, then the vanilla.

Finally, work in the flour. Knead dough on an unfloured board until smooth.

Firmly press dough into shortbread mould so that it comes up below the rope detail.

Poke all of the surface with a fork, and bake for 30-35 minutes or until lightly browned.

Let cool in pan for about 10 minutes. Loosen the edges with a plastic knife, and invert onto a cutting board. Cut into serving pieces while warm.

Basic Chana Masala

Soak 160 grams who,e chickpeas overnight.
Boil until soft. Set aside.
Mash 300 grams tomato in a mixer. Set aside.
Heat 5 teaspoons ghee. Saute a medium sized chopoed onion and 1 teaspoon chopped green chili until brown.
Add 1 1/2 teaspoons ginger paste and 1 teaspoon garlic paste. Saute for 2-3 minutes.
Add tomato puree and pinch of tumeric. Saute until cooked through.
Add cooked chickpeas, 2 teaspoons channa masala, salt to taste, and about 200 mL water to get desired consistency. Simmer 5 minutes.
Garnish with cilantro and julienned ginger.
Serve hot with rice.

Basic Chana Dal Masala

Boil 200 grams chana dal in 800 mL water until tender. Set aside.
Fry 80 grams chopped onions in 40 grams oil until tender.
Add 100 grams chopped tomatoes and 15 grams chana dal masala. Stir for 4-5 minutes until it becomes paste.
Take 1 part of tge boiled dal and add to paste. Mix well, then add remaining dal.
Check seasonings, then simmer for five minutes.
Serve with rice or roti.

Matt’s Kimchi

2 large heads napa cabbage (3 1/4 pounds each)—halved, cored and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 head bok choy or 2 heads of baby bok choy, cut into 2-inch pieces
2/3 cup kosher salt
10 garlic cloves, halved
1/2 small onion, chopped
One 1-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup plus
3 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
1/2 pound daikon, peeled and cut into matchsticks
1 bunch scallions, cut into 2-inch lengths
1 bunch carrots, cut into matchsticks
3/4 cup gochugaru (Korean coarse red pepper powder)

In each of 2 very large bowls, layer the cabbage and bok choy with the salt. Let stand for 45 minutes. Toss the cabbage well and let stand for 45 minutes longer.

Fill a sink with cold water. Swirl the cabbage and bok choy in it to remove the salt; drain and repeat. Drain well, lightly pat dry with paper towels and transfer to a very large bowl.

In a mini food processor, combine the garlic, onion, ginger and sugar and puree. Add the fish sauce and process until blended.

Add the daikon, scallions, and carrots to the cabbage and bok choy and toss.

Add the garlic mixture and the red pepper powder and toss thoroughly.

Pack the cabbage into three 1-quart jars. Press plastic wrap on the surface of the kimchi and put the caps on loosely.

Let stand at room temperature for 3 days, until the cabbage is tangy and bubbling.

Store in the refrigerator. The kimchi can be refrigerated for up to 6 months.

Agrodolce Sauce

2 Fresno chiles, thinly sliced
3/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 cup honey
2 tablespoons golden raisins, chopped
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Bring chiles, vinegar, honey, raisins, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt to a boil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer until syrupy, 8–10 minutes.

Just before serving, reheat agrodolce, adding a splash of water if needed to loosen.

This stuff would be great with any roasted vegetable—think cipollini onions and eggplant—and makes a seriously good glaze for grilled pork chops or chicken thighs or wings(!!). A schmear on a sandwich, a drizzle over cut fruit, or a dollop on a cheese plate wouldn’t suck, either.

It’s also fun to treat the agrodolce recipe as a basic formula to be riffed upon. Try swapping out the red wine vinegar for another acid like cider or sherry vinegar, or switching honey for another sweetener; we like the complex dark notes that brown sugar or good maple syrup brings to the table. And the golden raisins? Any dried fruit—chopped apricots, tart cherries, currants—is welcome.

Lemon Souffle

About 1 teaspoon unsalted butter for the dish
1 cup sugar, plus some for the dish
6 eggs, separated
1 tablespoon minced or grated lemon or orange zest
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon or orange juice or Grand Marnier or other orange-flavored liqueur
Pinch salt

Butter a 2-quart soufflé or other deep baking dish. Sprinkle the dish with sugar, invert it, and tap to remove excess sugar. Set aside and heat the oven to 350 degrees.

Whisk the egg yolks with 3/4 cup of the sugar until light and very thick; the mixture will fall in a ribbon from the ends of the beaters when it is ready. Beat in the flavorings and set aside.

Beat the egg whites with the salt until they hold soft peaks; continue to beat, gradually adding the remaining 1/4 cup sugar, until they are very stiff but still glossy. Stir a good spoonful of them thoroughly into the egg yolk mixture to lighten it, then fold in the remaining whites, using a rubber spatula or your hand.

Transfer to the prepared soufflé dish(es) and bake until the center is nearly set, 25 to 35 minutes (15 to 25 minutes for individual soufflés). Serve immediately.

Burmese Red Chili Oil

1 cup packed dried red chiles, soaked in lukewarm water for 20 minutes
1 cup peanut oil

Drain the chiles and remove and discard the stems. Put the chiles in a food processor and process to a coarse paste.

Pour the oil into a nonreactive pan and set over medium heat. Add the chile paste and bring to a bubbling boil, then remove from the heat and let stand until cooled to room temperature.

You can store the oil with the chiles in it, but in Burma the oil often is served on its own. For clear oil, drain the oil through a sieve into a clean, dry glass jar and seal with the lid. Store away from heat and light. You can keep the chiles in another glass jar for a spicy condiment, or discard them.

Pressure Cooker Indian Onion Masala

1/4 cup peanut oil (or other high smoke point )
2 cups onion, diced
1 cup tomatoes, chopped
8-10 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced ginger minced
1 green Serrano , jalapeño or thai chile minced (optional)
1 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
2 teaspoon garam masala
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup water

Turn your Instant Pot onto Sauté on high. When the display reads HOT, add oil.

When the oil is hot and shimmering, add in the ginger, garlic and green chili and sauté for 1-2 minutes.

Add in the onion and mix well. You’re going to sauté this for 10 minutes, stirring once or twice.

Add all the dry spices and mix well, being careful not to let them burn. Be sure to put the spices on top of the veggies rather than on the surface of the pan directly.

Add tomatoes and the water and deglaze your pot well, scraping up all the brown bits.

Close and cook at High Pressure for 15 minutes, allowing it to release pressure naturally.

Open up the pot and if it’s too watery, just sauté for bit it will thicken as it cools.

You’re now ready to cook with this immediately, put some in the fridge for a week or so, or in the freezer for several months (use 1-cup containers). This recipe made about 2.5 cups.

Punjabi Garam Masala

1 tablespoon coriander seeds
2 teaspoons cumin seeds
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
3 cinnamon sticks broken up
3 bay leaves broken up

Place a small skillet over medium heat and add all the ingredients. Toast them until they’re fragrant but not browned, about 2 to 3 minutes. They will continue to cook for a while after you take them out of the pan, so if you’re in doubt, undercook them.

Transfer the spices to a plate or a paper towel to cool completely. Once cool, place the spices in a coffee or spice grinder. Grind until the spices form a medium-fine powder.
Stop the grinder several times and shake it so all the spices get under the blades and grind more evenly. When you’re finished, unplug the grinder. Holding the lid in place, turn the grinder upside down and shake the spice mixture into the lid.
Pour the garam masala into a small jar with a tight-fitting lid. Store in a cool, dry place for 3 to 4 weeks.

Sichuan Chili Oil

1 1/2 cups oil (ideally a vegetable, peanut, or grapeseed oil)
5 star anise
1 cinnamon stick, preferably cassia cinnamon
2 bay leaves
3 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns
3/4 cup Asian crushed red pepper flakes (Sichuan chili flakes are the best)
1 – 1½ teaspoons salt (to taste)

Heat the oil, star anise, cinnamon stick, bay leaves, and Sichuan peppercorns in a small saucepan over medium high heat. When the oil starts to bubble slightly, turn the heat down to medium.

Let the oil cook for 30 minutes like this. If you start to see that slight bubbling die down, periodically turn the heat back up to medium-high, then back down to medium if it gets too hot.

When the oil is done cooking, the seeds and pods should be darker in color, but not blackened (that means they burned, which results in subpar chili oil). Let the oil cool for 5 minutes. In a separate heat-proof bowl, measure out the crushed red pepper flakes and salt.

Remove the aromatics from the oil using a fine mesh strainer. Slowly pour the oil over the chili flakes, and stir well. When completely cooled, transfer to a jar, and store in the refrigerator. The oil will keep for up to 6 months when stored this way (always remember to use a clean spoon to dip into the jar!)

Another version:

4 tablespoons crushed Chinese or Korean chili flakes
2 teaspoons five spice powder
3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
1 teaspoon ground Sichuan peppercorn
(optional) 2 whole star anise
2 bay leaves
1 cup vegetable oil (or grapeseed oil)
(optional) 1 piece thinly sliced ginger

Combine chili flakes, five spice powder, sesame seeds, star anise, Sichuan peppercorns, and bay leaves in a heatproof ceramic bowl that can hold at least 2 cups liquid. Place the bowl on a heat resistant coaster.

Heat oil in a wok (or a skillet) over medium-high heat. Add ginger. When the ginger starts to wither and turns golden brown, immediately turn off the heat. The oil should reach 370 degrees F (190 C) and no higher than 400 F (200 C) if read with an instant thermometer.

Carefully pour oil or use a ladle to transfer oil into the bowl of mixed spices. The oil will bubble for a few seconds and cook the spices. While the the oil is bubbling, use a metal spoon to stir gently to mix the spices, so they’ll cook thoroughly.

When the oil cools down a bit, scoop out and discard the star anise and bay leaf.

The oil is now ready to use! Its flavor will mature if you let it rest for a day, allowing the spices to infuse into the oil.

The oil can be stored covered at room temperature for two weeks, or up to six months in the fridge in an airtight container.

One more:

First, you’ll need a ton of chilies and Sichuan peppercorns. For the former, just about any kind (and level of heat) will do; just make sure they’re roughly ground and you have a lot—at least half a pound. For the latter, you want at least 1/2 cup of the freshest you can find (many shops sell them online).

This is the most important step: Infusing the oil. In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, simmer 1 1/2 quarts canola oil with a whole head of garlic, a 3-inch nub of ginger, and a host of dried spices: star anise, coriander seeds, cinnamon sticks, black and green cardamom. You want the garlic and ginger just fizzing over low heat, making sure neither browns or burns, for at least 2 hours, until the oil is deeply fragrant.

In a large steel mixing bowl, add the ground chilies, the Sichuan peppercorns, 1 tablespoon of salt, and 2 tablespoons of soy sauce. Stir to combine.

When the infused oil is ready, turn the heat up to high, and when the ginger and garlic are furiously fizzing, pour the oil through a sieve into the dried chili mixture. And, uh, be careful!

Chefs in Sichuan say that if the oil foams up, that’s a good sign.

When it’s cooled down a bit, pour the chili oil into jars: Large if you’re keeping this for yourself, smaller if you want to give as gifts. (This stuff makes a good gift!)

While it’s pretty good right now, it will taste even better a few days from now. Plus, it’ll keep pretty much forever, especially if you put it in the fridge.

To make a sauce for boiled dumplings: a good heaping spoonful or two with a ton of black vinegar.

Basic Sous Vide Steaks

2 (1 1/2- to 2-inch thick) ribeye, strip, porterhouse or t-bone (about 1 pound each), or 4 tenderloin steaks (6 to 8 ounces each)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 sprigs thyme or rosemary (optional)
2 garlic cloves (optional)
2 shallots, thinly sliced (optional)
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons butter

Preheat a sous-vide cooker to desired final temperature according to charts above. Season steaks generously with salt and pepper. Place in sous-vide bags along with herbs, garlic, and shallots (if using) and distribute evenly. Seal bags and place in water bath for time according to charts below.

For Strip, Ribeye, Porterhouse/T-Bone, and Butcher’s Cuts:

–Very Rare to Rare, use 120°F (49°C) to 128°F (53°C) for 1 to 2 1/2 hours
–Medium-rare, use 129°F (54°C) to 134°F (57°C) for 1 to 4 hours (2 1/2 hours max if under 130°F/54°C)
–Medium, use 135°F (57°C) to 144°F (62°C) for 1 to 4 hours
–Medium-well, use 145°F (63°C) to 155°F (68°C) for 1 to 3 1/2 hours
–Well done, use 156°F (69°C) and up for 1 to 3 hours

To finish in a pan: Turn on your vents and open your windows. Remove steak from water bath and bag and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Place a heavy cast iron or stainless steel skillet with vegetable, canola, or rice bran oil over the hottest burner you have and preheat the skillet until it starts to smoke. Gently lay the steak in the skillet using your fingers or a set of tongs. If desired, add a tablespoon of butter. For a cleaner-tasting sear, omit the butter at this stage. After 15 to 30 seconds, flip the steak so that the second side comes into contact with the pan. Repeat, flipping the steak every 15 to 30 seconds until it has developed a nice brown sear, about a minute and a half total. If you did not add butter earlier, add butter to the skillet about 30 seconds before the steak is done for added richness. Serve steak immediately.

To finish on the grill: Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Alternatively, set half the burners on a gas grill to the highest heat setting, cover, and preheat for 10 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Remove steak from water bath and bag and carefully pat dry with paper towels. Place steak directly over the hot side of the grill and cook, turning every 15 to 30 seconds, until a deep, rich crust has formed, about 1 1/2 minutes total. If the fire threatens to flare up as the steak drips fat into it, suffocate the fire by closing the grill lid until the flames die out. Alternatively, transfer the steak to the cooler side of the grill using a set of long tongs until the flames subside. Do not allow the steak to get engulfed in flames. Transfer the cooked steak to a cutting board or serving platter and serve immediately.

Basic Sous Vide Chicken Breasts

2 bone-in, skin-on chicken breast halves
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 sprigs thyme or rosemary (optional)

Preheat a water bath to desired final temperature using a sous-vide cooker, according to the chart above. Season chicken generously with salt and pepper. Place chicken in zipper-lock bags or vacuum bags and add thyme or rosemary sprigs, if using.

If Using Zipper-Lock Bags: Remove air from zipper-lock bags by closing the bags, leaving the last inch of the top unsealed. Slowly lower into the preheated water bath, sealing the bag completely just before it fully submerges. If Using Vacuum Bags: Seal according to manufacturer’s instructions. Add bagged chicken to preheated water bath and cook according to the chart below:

–Tender and juicy for cold chicken salad, use 150°F (66°C) for 1 to 4 hours
–Very soft and juicy, served hot, use 140°F (60°C) for 1 1/2 to 4 hours
–Juicy, tender, and slightly stringy, served hot use 150°F (66°C) for 1 to 4 hours
Traditional, juicy, firm, and slightly stringy, served hot, use
160°F (71°C) for 1 to 4 hours

To Finish in a Pan: Turn on your vents and open your windows. Remove chicken from water bath and bag. Discard herbs, if using. Carefully pat chicken dry with paper towels. Heat the oil in a heavy cast iron or stainless steel skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Gently lay the chicken in the skillet, skin side down, using your fingers or a set of tongs. Hold the chicken down flat in the pan with a flexible metal spatula or your fingers (be careful of splattering oil). Cook until golden brown and crisp, about 2 minutes. Remove from pan and let rest until cool enough to handle, about 2 minutes. Remove bones with your fingertips. Slice chicken and serve.

To Finish on the Grill: Light one half chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill, and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Alternatively, set half the burners on a gas grill to medium-high heat setting, cover, and preheat for 10 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Remove chicken from water bath and bag. Discard herbs, if using. Carefully pat chicken dry with paper towels. Gently lay the chicken on the hot side of the grill, skin side down. Cook until nicely marked, about 2 minutes. Rotate 90 degrees and cook until chicken is marked again and skin is crisp, about 1 1/2 minutes longer. Remove from grill and let rest until cool enough to handle, about 2 minutes. Remove bones with your fingertips. Slice chicken and serve.

Pressure Cooker Basics: Stock

The Breville preset is 60 minutes, 12 psi, natural release.

To make a brown stock, use the sear setting to brown bone and vegetables prior to pressure or slow cooking.

Vegetables such as onions, carrots, and celery should be cut into large pieces. This will help keep the stock clear and make it easier to strain.

To shorten cooking time, add cold water to bowl while still in the sear mode and allow the water to come to a simmer before pressure cooking.

Beef Stock:

2 tablespoons olive oil
3 pounds beef bones
2 teaspoons tomato paste
1 large onion, unpeeled, quartered
1 carrot, roughly chopped
1 stalk celery, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, unpeeled
12 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh thyme
2.5 quarts cold water

Use the sear feature to preheat the cooking bowl. Heat olive oil until shimmering, the, working in batches, brown the bones on all sides, 3-4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside.

Add tomato paste, onions, carrots, and celery and stir to coat. Cook until browned, 5-7 minutes.

Return bones and any accumulated juices to the cooking bowl. Add remaining ingredients.

Use the pressure cook setting to cook. When cooking has completed, let stock cool, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.

Chicken Stock:

3 pounds chicken bones or pieces
1 large onion, peeled and quartered
2 carrots, roughly chopped
2 stalks celery, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, unpeeled
10 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh thyme
5 sprigs flat parsley
2.5 quarts cold water

Add all ingredients to cooking bowl.

Use the pressure cook setting to cook. When cooking has completed, let stock cook, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.

Vegetable Stock:

2 large onions, unpeeled, halved
4 stalks celery cut into 1-inch pieces
2 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
8 ounces crimini or button mushrooms, halved
1 head garlic, halved crosswise
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh thyme
6 sprigs flat parsley
2.5 quarts cold water

Add all ingredients to cooking bowl.

Use the pressure cook setting to cook. When cooking has completed, let stock cook, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.

Seafood Stock:

1 tablespoon olive oil
1.5 – 2 pounds fish heads, cones, shrimp shells, etc., rinsed
1/4 fennel stalks, chopped
1 small leek, white and light green parts, washed and chopped
2 sprigs fresh thyme
4 sprigs flat parsley
1/4 cup white wine
2.5 quarts cold water

Use the sear feature to heat the cooking bowl. Heat the olive oil until shimmering, then add the bones and cook until opaque but not brown, 2-4 minutes.

Select the pressure cook feature, then adjust the cooking time to 10 minutes. When cooking has completed, let stock cook, then strain. Refrigerate overnight, then defat and clarify.