Vietnamese Grilled Lemongrass Pork (Thit Heo Nuong Xa)

You can use this marinade with small pieces of pork and thread them on skewers and dip them in some nuoc cham dipping sauce. If there’s no lemongrass, use about 1/2 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder instead. Slicing the pork at the end is a traditional Vietnamese approach to eating meat as the pieces are easier to pick up with chopsticks. Enjoy with rice, a stir-fried or grilled vegetable and a quick soup (canh). Feel free to stuff leftovers into banh mi sandwiches and use them for bun rice noodle salad bowls.

Ingredients

1 pound boneless pork shoulder steak, about 1/2 inch thick

Marinade

1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons granulated or light brown sugar
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 tablespoon chopped shallot or yellow onion
1 stalk lemongrass, trimmed and finely chopped (3 tablespoons)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoon dark (black) soy sauce
1 1/2 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon oil

Cut the pork shoulder steak into pieces about 3 to 4 inches big. Set aside.

Put the sugar, garlic, shallot and lemongrass into an electric mini chopper and process to a fine texture. (Or, mince the garlic, shallot, and lemongrass individually, put them into a bowl, and add the sugar.) Add the pepper, soy sauce, fish sauce, and oil and process to combine well. Aim for a relatively smooth texture. The marinade will be chocolate brown. Transfer to a bowl.

Add the pork, and turn to coat well. Cover and set aside at room temperature to marinate for 1 hour. Or, refrigerate up to 24 hours, letting the meat sit out at room temperature for 45 minutes to remove some of the chill before grilling.

Preheat a grill to medium-high. Grill for 6 to 8 minutes, turning frequently, until cooked through. Nick with a knife to test. Transfer to a plate, loosely cover with foil or an inverted bowl for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Peking Meat Sauce Noodles (Zha Jiang Mian)

9 ounces dried spaghetti
5 to 6 ounces baby spinach leaves and/or radish greens
1 large handful bean sprouts
5 or 6 red radishes, thinly sliced then cut into matchsticks (1 cup total)
2 Persian cucumbers or 1/2 English or Armenian cucumber, seeded and cut into matchsticks
6 ounces (3/4 cup) ground pork or chicken thigh
Scant 1 teaspoon dry sherry or Shaoxing rice wine
3 tablespoons light (white) miso
3 tablespoons red (aka) miso
1 1/2 teaspoons hoisin (optional)
1 tablespoon regular or gluten-free soy sauce
Scant 1/4 teaspoon MSG
2 teaspoons canola or other neutral oil
1/3 cup lightly packed finely chopped green onion, white and green parts
Generous 1/2 cup water
2 cloves garlic, minced (2 teaspoons)
Chile oil, chile garlic sauce, sambal oelek, sriracha

Cook the spaghetti in a large pot of boiling water until chewy-tender. Drain, rinse, and set aside to drain well.

Put the spinach and bean sprouts in two separate bowls. Add very hot water (use a kettle to heat the water) to just cover. Let sit for 1 to 3 minutes (longer for the sprouts), until softened. Drain separately and set aside with the radishes and cucumber.

Mix the ground meat with the sherry. Combine the two kinds of miso, hoisin, soy sauce, and MSG (or other seasoning powder). Keep near the stove.

Set a deep skillet or shallow saucepan over medium heat. Add the oil. When shimmering, add the seasoned pork. Stir vigorously with a fork to break up the meat into small pieces. When well broken up, add the green onion, stirring constantly. Cook for 45 to 60 seconds longer before adding the miso mixture.

Once the miso and meat are well combined, add the water. Adjust the heat to low. Let gently cook for 2 minutes (expect no bubbling action) to combine and slightly darken. Turn off the heat, then stir in the garlic. Cool a few minutes, taste and if needed, add a tiny splash of water to thin out. Set aside. Use warm or slightly above room temperature.

To serve, you may set out the noodles, meat sauce, bean sprouts, cucumber, spinach, and radish for people to compose their own bowls. Or, divide the components up among four (4) individual pasta or noodle bowls and let people mix things up themselves. Alternatively, make one giant bowl and toss at the table and serve. Offer chile oil or sauce for people to add heat. Spoon and fork are my utensils of choice.

Thai Pork (or Chicken) Satay with Peanut Sauce

Satay Ingredients

1/2 lb (500 grams) pork or chicken, cut
into thin slices about 1″ wide and 3″ long
2 tsp. yellow curry powder
1 cup coconut milk
1 tbsp. soy sauce
30 bamboo sticks

Peanut Sauce Ingredients

2 tbsp. red curry paste
2 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. peanuts
1 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. tamarind juice
2 tbsp. coconut cream

Marinate pork or chicken for 30 minutes with all the satay ingredients.

To prepare the peanut sauce, heat coconut cream over medium heat and add curry paste mix well and add the remaining ingredients. Stir until thick and sauce-like.

Skewer the marinated pork or chicken onto the bamboo sticks. Grill over hot coals until cooked.

Serve with dipping sauce and cucumber salad.

Thai Satay (Chicken, Beef, or Pork)

1 1/2 lb. boneless chicken breast, beef, or pork
1 tsp. whole coriander seeds
1 tsp. whole cumin seeds
1 tsp. ground turmeric
3-4 shallots, peeled and sliced thin crosswise
1 stalk fresh lemon grass, sliced thin crosswise
1/4 inch piece of fresh galangal
1 clove garlic, peeled and smashed
1/2 tsp. sea salt
2 tsp. sugar
20 bamboo skewers
2 Tbsp. cooking oil, canola or peanut

Slice meat into long thin slices, approximately 1/4″ thick and 2″ in length. Pat dry with paper towels.

Dry roast coriander seeds for a minute or two in a wok over medium heat to roast lightly, stirring often.

Grind the coriander seeds in a mortar and pestle or electric coffee grinder (reserved for spices).

Combine all the spices with the shallot, lemon grass, galangal and garlic together in a bowl.

Add meat to the marinade and mix well to cover meat. Allow to marinate for at least an hour or up to overnight.

Before cooking, soak bamboo skewers in water for at least 10 minutes, so that they will not burn.

Skewer 2 to 3 pieces of meat onto each stick. Grill over a hot fire until cooked through. Baste with cooking oil after turning.

Serve with rice and a cucumber salad.

Chicken (or Pork) with Holy Basil (Pad Ga Prao)

1 lb boneless chicken thighs, coarsely chopped, or cut into small bite-size pieces (or an equivalent amount of chopped pork)
4-6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2-3 shallots, thinly sliced (or substitute with 1/2 cup sliced onion)
2-3 tbsp peanut oil for stir-frying
2 tsp black soy sauce (the semi-sweet kind, siew dohm)
1-2 tbsp Thai fish sauce (nam bplah), to taste
1 cup fresh Thai holy basil (bai gka-prow)
2 small kaffir lime leaves (bai ma-gkrood), very finely slivered (optional)
5-10 Thai chillies (prik kee noo), chopped and pounded with a mortar and pestle; or 2-3 fresh jalapeno or fresno peppers, cut into large slivers
Dash of ground white pepper

Prepare the ingredients as indicated. Leave the fresh basil leaves whole; the flowers may also be used. The dried holy basil will soften when soaked in tap water for 10-15 minutes. Pull off and discard the hard stems. Drain.

Heat a wok until the surface is smoking hot. Swirl in the oil to coat the wok surface. Wait a few seconds for the oil to heat, then stir in the garlic, followed a few seconds later with shallots. Stir another few seconds before adding the chicken. Stir-fry a minute or two, or until most of the chicken has started to change color on the outside and is no longer pink.

Toss in the chillies, slivered kaffir lime leaves and reconstituted dried holy basil (if using). Sprinkle black soy sauce over the mixture and stir-fry another 15-20 seconds. Then add fresh basil leaves and fish sauce to taste. Stir and mix well. Stir-fry another half a minute, or until the basil is wilted and the chicken is cooked through. Sprinkle with white pepper. Stir and transfer to a serving dish, or spoon directly over individual plates of plain steamed rice.

Drunken Noodles (Kway Teow Pad Kee Mao)

3-4 Tablespoons cooking oil (palm, soybean or corn but not olive oil)
1 pkg (13.2 oz) Thai rice noodles
1 pkg (1.76oz) Holy Basil Seasoning, Lobo brand or 3 1/2 Tablespoon Por Kwan brand (optional)
1 lb kale, Chinese broccoli or green cabbage (2-3 cups), cut into bite size pieces
4 oz cherry tomatoes
6 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
4 oz Thai chilies peppers, crushed
7oz (200 grams) chicken or pork, sliced into thin pieces
2 Tablespoons Thai fish sauce (Golden Boy brand is recommended)
2 1/2 Tablespoons Oyster Sauce (Thai Mae Krua brand is recommended)
2-3 teaspoons Thai Sweet Black Soy Sauce
1 teaspoon white sugar, to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/2 cup sweet basil leaves or holy basil if available (leaves and flowers), optional
2 Anaheim chilies or 1 green bell pepper, cut into strips, optional (for added texture and color)
Lime wedges to serve

Soak the dried rice noodles in cool or lukewarm tap water for 40 minutes to one hour or until the noodles are limp but still firm to touch.
Heat oil in wok until almost smoking. Add the garlic and Thai chilli peppers and stir-fry quickly until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add chicken or pork and stir-fry until no longer pink.
Add ready-made Holy Basil Seasoning, fish sauce, oyster sauce, black sweet soy sauce, sugar and ground white pepper. Stir to mix. Add pre-soaked noodles, fresh basil if using, tomatoes and bell or Anaheim chili peppers (if desired). Garnish with fresh basil leaves, lime wedges and serve immediately, hot!

Pad See Ew with Pork

14oz dried rice noodles, soaked in water for 40 minutes
1/2 lb (1 cup) pork, thinly sliced
approximately 6 tblsp cooking oil
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 cup Chinese broccoli (or broccoli, cauliflower, carrots or mushrooms), cut into 1″ pieces
2 eggs, beaten

Sauce:
3 tbsp oyster sauce
1 tsp black soy sauce
2 tbsp light soy sauce
2 tsp sugar
1/8 tsp ground black pepper

Combine all the sauce ingredients and add the sliced pork. Marinate the meat in the sauces at room temperature while preparing the other ingredients.

Heat 1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil in a wok over high heat, add one of the cloves of smashed garlic, stir briefly (about 30 seconds), then add the cut vegetables and cook stirring constantly until partially cooked, but still firm. Remove from the wok.

Heat 4 tblsp cooking oil in a wok over medium heat until hot. Add the remainder of the garlic cloves, stir briefly. Then add the noodles and stir fry another 2-3 minutes until brown and soft, remove from the wok to a plate.

Add 1 tblsp oil to the wok, when hot add the marinated pork and eggs, stirring to cook through and combine. Then add the vegetables and stir fry to combine. Then add the noodles and stir fry to combine and if possible char the noodles until a little crispy on the edge (this may require more oil then you like!).

Serve hot with small condiment bowls of ground dried red chilis, sliced green chilies in white vinegar and white sugar.
Note: This recipe is adapted from A Passion for Thai Cooking available in our Thai cookbook section. We have broken down the cooking of the ingredients for adaptation to a Western home stove. In Thailand this dish is best cooked in the outdoor marketplaces over blazingly high heat all at once in a big wok.

Thai Pork Satay (Moo Satay)

PORK AND MARINADE

2 Pounds Pork tenderloin, sliced into 1/4
4 Tablespoons Lemongrass water
5 Tablespoons Thin soy sauce
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1 Tablespoon Sugar
14 Ounces Coconut milk
1 Teaspoon Turmeric powder
1/2 Tablespoon Thai curry powder
1 Teaspoon Baking Soda

BASTING LIQUID

1 Remaining from above Coconut milk
1 Tablespoon Sugar
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1 Teaspoon Turmeric powder

SATAY SAUCE

5 Whole Dried Chile, soaked in water to soften
1 1/2 Tablespoons Chopped fresh galangal
1 1/2 Tablespoons Thinly sliced lemongrass
5 Leaves Fresh kaffir lime leaves, finely sliced
2 Tablespoons Fresh shallot, thinly sliced
3 Cloves Garlic
1/4 Tablespoon Shrimp paste
1 Tablespoon Matsaman curry paste
1/4 Cup White sesame seed, toasted in a dry wok or skillet
1/4 Cup Dried roasted peanut
2 Cups Coconut cream
1/4 Cup Palm sugar
2 Tablespoons Fish sauce
1 Tablespoon Tamarind concentrate mixed with 1 tablespoon water

AJAD

1/2 Cup White vinegar
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1/3 Cup Sugar
1/2 Cup Thinly sliced cucumber
1/4 Cup Sliced shallot
3 Each Fresh Thai chile peppers, sliced

METHOD FOR PORK MARINADE

Thinly slice 1 stalk of fresh lemongrass, put in a bowl, then pour 1/2 cup boiling water over it. Remove 4 tablespoons of the water and set to cool.

For the can of coconut milk, don’t stir it up, and some will have a thicker consistency. Measure 1/3 cup of the thicker part for the marinade. You will use the thinner part for your basting liquid below.

In a mixing bowl, combine the lemongrass water with the coconut cream, and the other ingredients. Mix well, then add the pork, and refrigerate for 1 hour or more.

METHOD FOR BASTING LIQUID

Combine the four ingredients, mix well, and set aside.

METHOD FOR SATAY SAUCE

Start by pounding your white sesame seeds in a mortar & pestle, into a thick paste. Set aside. Then pound the peanuts until fine, and set aside.

Next, put the whole dried chile, fresh galangal, lime leaves, and lemongrass into the mortar & pestle. Pound together well, then add shallot, garlic, and shrimp paste. Leave it in the mortar. Heat a wok or large pan to medium heat, and add this mixture from the mortar. Saute it with 1 cup coconut cream. Stir constantly, until all dissolved. Add matsaman curry paste, fish sauce, tamarind, palm sugar, and stir well. Add remaining coconut cream.

Add the sesame seed paste and pounded peanuts (or leave the peanuts out if you prefer) to this mixture and cook over medium/low heat for 10 minutes or so. It should all blend together well.

METHOD FOR AJAD

In a small saucepan, mix vinegar, salt and sugar over medium heat. Stir until dissolves, then remove from heat and set to cool. Just before serving, add the cucumber, shallot and sliced chiles to this.

PREPARING AND SERVING YOUR PORK SATAY

Cook the marinated pork skewers over charcoal, constantly basting them with the basting liquid. Serve together with the satay sauce, ajad, and for an authentic twist–with sliced toast as shown.
Enjoy!

Crispy Pork and Garlic (Moo Tod Gratiem)

1 Pound Lean Pork Meat, Sliced Into 1/4
1 Teaspoon Corriander Powder
1/2 Head of Garlic, Pounded in A mortar & pestle
1/2 Head of Garlic, Roughly Chopped
1 Teaspoon Thai Pepper Powder
2 Teaspoons Corn Starch
2 Teaspoons Fish Sauce
1 Tablespoon Thin Soy Sauce
1 Teaspoon Sugar
1 Teaspoon Sesame Oil

Pound your pork slices with a meat mallet to soften it, then transfer to a mixing bowl.

In a mortar & pestle, pound 1/2 head of garlic. Add corriander powder, Thai pepper powder, and pound into a paste. Add this paste to the pork in a mixing bowl.

Add corn starch, fish sauce, thin soy sauce, sugar and sesame oil. Mix well and let this marinade in the fridge for 1/2 hour or longer.

Heat wok, and add just enough oil to fry your pork. Over medium/low heat (not too high), cook your pork in the oil and be careful not to over cook it. Fry both sides until golden brown. Remove from wok.

Remove any bits of blackened garlic from the oil. Next, add 1/2 head of sliced garlic. Quickly remove it from the oil as soon as it gets brown. Set the garlic on a paper towel to dry for a few minutes.

Put fried garlic on top of the pork, serve with cilantro as a garnish (optional), and your favorite rice. Enjoy!

Note: In Thailand, this is a recipe that’s usually made at home, not typically found in a restaurant. Mothers will make this for kids to eat on a long trip or picnic. The pork smells delicious, with the garlic. Kept in a food carrier, this is a special treat. Usually served with sticky rice, or jasmine rice.

Issan Pork Salad (Yum Mu Issan)

1 Pound Pork Steak or Similar Cut of meat
1 Cup Fresh Thai chile peppers
1/4 Cup Tamarind Sauce (50% concentrate 50% water)
1/4 Cup Fish Sauce
1 Cup Onions, Thinly Sliced
2 Tablespoons Freshly Grated Ginger
1/2 Cup Chopped Coriander Leaves

Barbeque or grill the meat to the desired degree of done-ness.

Roast the chilis in a moderate oven (or grill them), until the skin begins to change color. Grind the chilis to a pulp and add equal parts of tamarind sauce and fish sauce until the whole forms a slightly fluid paste.

Cut the pork diagonally across the grain into eigth inch thick slices, and cut the slices into 1″ long pieces and then toss with the sauce and allow to marinade for about 24 hours. Add the onions and ginger and coriander leaves.

Toss (as a salad is tossed) and serve on a bed of lettuce with a bowl of sticky rice or Thai jasmine rice.

Pork and Galangal

2 Pounds Pork
5 Tablepoons Chopped Garlic
5 Tablepoons Fresh Galangal, Julienned
5 Tablepoons Coriander/Cilantro (leaves and stems), chopped
Sweet soy sauce (see method)
2 Tablepoons Palm Sugar
Light soy sauce to taste
3 Pieces Star Anise

Cut the pork into chunks the size of a small fist. Grill or barbeque or braise them to seal the meat and crisp the outsides.

Finely chop the garlic, and other ingredients (except the star anise and soy sauces) in amortar and pestle, so they are easily integrated into the gravy.

Put the other ingredients in a large pot, add the pork, then add enough pork stock to cover the meat, and then add enough dark soy to produce a rich coloration.

Bring to a boil, and boil for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat to a light simmer, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes.

Taste and add sugar or light soy to adjust the flavor. Continue to simmer until the meat is tender enough to fall apart when probed with a chop stick (about 45 minutes). Add additional stock if the pot begins to dry out, but allow the sauce to reduce to a thickish gravy. Stir occasionally to prevent sticking.

Transfer to a large serving dish and serve with Thai jasmine rice (warn the unwary not to eat the star anise!)

Note: the pot should be large enough that when the ingredients and stock are assembled at the start of boiling the pot is about half full to prevent it boiling over.

This is probably the Thai equivalent of nyonya pork.

Pork and Peppers (Moo Pad Prik Yuak)

2 Tablespoons Oil
2 Cloves Garlic, chopped
1 Cup Sliced Sweet Peppers
1 Cup Sliced Pork
2 Teaspoons Oyster Sauce
1 Teaspoon Golden Mountain Sauce
1 Teaspoon Sugar

In a wok, heat 2 tablespoons oil, then add two cloves chopped garlic, fry until fragrant.

Next, add pork and fry until it starts to cook. Add your sliced peppers, then season with two teaspoons oyster sauce, one teaspoon Golden Mountain Seasoning, and one teaspoon sugar.

Stir fry, remove from wok and serve with steamed jasmine rice.

Rice Vermicelli with Garlic Pork Tenderloin (Sen Mee Pad Kratien Moo Manau)

3 1/2 Grams Rice Vermicelli
5 Ounces Pork Tenderloin, Thinly Sliced
2 1/2 Tablespoons Freshly-Squeezed Lime Juice
1 1/2 Tablespoons Fish Sauce
2 Teaspoons White Sugar
2 Large Cloves Garlic, Sliced
4 Fresh Thai Chile Peppers, finely chopped
2 Tablespoons Fresh Garlic, Finely Chopped
2 Tablespoons Vegetable Oil
1 Teaspoon Thin Soy Sauce
Fresh green beans
Fresh Mint Leaves, for garnish
Garnish Thinly sliced lime

Soak the rice vermicelli in lukewarm water for 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.

In a small bowl, mix lime juice, fish sauce, sugar, sliced garlic, and at least 1 teaspoon finely-chopped fresh Thai chiles (more to add spice). Set aside.

Heat vegetable oil in wok over low/medium heat. Add finely-chopped garlic and fry until golden brown and aromatic. Quickly remove wok from heat, remove the garlic with a slotted spoon or strainer, and set garlic aside. Keep the oil in your wok.

Return wok to burner, over low/medium heat, add the soaked rice vermicelli, thin soy sauce, and cook for a few minutes until noodles are done. Keep stirring the noodles, be careful not to burn them. Transfer your noodles to a serving plate (see pictures at right), topping with fried garlic.

Blanche the green beans in boiling water for 1.5 minutes, set aside. Blanche the sliced pork in boiling water for 2-3 minutes, set aside

Put green beans on the plate, and top with cooked pork. Spoon the sauce mixture over the pork, and garnish with fresh mint leaves and sliced lime. Enjoy!

Yum Khao Tod Nam Moo Sod (Crispy Rice Pork or Chicken Larb)

INGREDIENTS FOR KHAO TOD CRISPY RICE BALLS

2 Cups Day old cooked jasmine rice
1 Tablespoon Red Curry Paste
1 Tablespoon Oyster Sauce
4 Fresh Kaffir Lime Leaves, thinly sliced
1 Egg, Beaten
2 Tablespoons Rice Flour
Frying Vegetable Oil
INGREDIENTS FOR NAEM MOO SOD

1 Pound Ground Pork or Chicken
3 Cloves Garlic, Finely-Minced
1/4 Cup Fresh Ginger, Sliced into matchsticks
1/4 Cup Thinly Sliced Shallot
1/4 Cup Roast Peanut
2 Tablespoons Finely Chopped Spring Onion
2 Tablespoons Chopped Cilantro
2 Teaspoons Salt
1/2 Cup Lime Juice
3 Tablespoons Fish Sauce
Cane Sugar
Coarse Ground Thai Chile
4 Fresh Thai Chiles

METHOD FOR KHAO TOD (CRISPY RICE BALLS)

Start by warming the oil using a lowest heat setting. As the oil warms, prepare the rice balls as follows:

In a mixing bowl, combine rice, curry paste, oyster sauce and lime leaves. Knead this together by hand, then grab about 1/3 of this mixture and transfer to a mortar and pestle. Pound it so the mix becomes mushy, remove to another bowl, then add another batch to the mortar and pound until it’s all been processed.

Add a beaten egg to the pounded rice mixture, knead together until combined.

In a separate bowl, mix 2 tablespoons rice flour with 5 tablespoons water.

Increase the heat of your oil to medium/low.

In a quick motion, form a ball from the rice mixture (it’s very sticky and will stick to your hands), then roll the ball around the rice flour liquid for a moment, and gently drop the ball into your oil. Repeat until you’re cooking about 10 balls.

Turn the balls over after a few minutes, being careful not to let them burn. Remove when crispy, place on a paper towel.

Put 10 whole dried chiles into the oil and fry until they start to change color, then remove and set aside.

METHOD FOR NAEM MOO SOD

In a mixing bowl, mix pork, garlic, salt, and 2 tablespoons lime juice. Knead together, then cook your pork in a wok or skillet. Remove pork, put 1/2 of this pork into a clean mixing bowl.

Break apart 5 or 6 of your crispy rice balls and add it to your cooked pork. You can, as we did, give these broken pieces of rice one more minute of heat on a skillet to make them extra crispy, before adding to the pork.

To this, add some peanuts, ginger, cilantro, chopped onion, shallot, a little bit of sliced fresh Thai chiles. Next, season it with fish sauce, sugar, ground chile and lime juice. Our measurements were as follows:

1 tablespoon fish sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground chile pepper
1 tablespoon lime juiceMix, and serve with fresh betel leaves and whole dried chiles on the side. Put a spoonful on top of a fresh betel leaf, close the leaf and pop it into your mouth.

Gai Kor Kling (Southern Thai Wok Seared Chicken, Beef, or Pork)

1 Chicken Breast or equivalent amount of beef or pork
2 Fresh Kaffir Lime Leaves
1 Teaspoon Fresh Kaffir Lime Peel Sliced
1 Teaspoon Fresh Galangal Sliced
1 Teaspoon Fresh Lemongrass Sliced
1 Teaspoon Fresh Shallot
1 Teaspoon Fresh Turmeric Sliced
2 Fresh Red Thai Chilies Chopped
2 Fresh Red Thai Chies Matchstick Sliced for Garnish
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1 Teaspoon Sugar
1/2 Teaspoon Whole White Peppercorn
1/2 Teaspoon Shrimp Paste
1 Tablespoon Vegetable Oil

You can use ground chicken or, as we did, use a knife to finely chop your chicken breast. In a mortar & pestle, add chopped fresh red chile, pound together with lemongrass, shallot, turmeric, galangal, and kaffir lime. Pound to a fine paste, then add peppercorn, salt, and shrimp paste. Pound until fine.

In a wok, over medium/hight, heat vegetable oil then add the chile paste mixture. Fry until fragrant, then add the ground chicken breast. Continue to stir and roll the mixture. As it cooks, season with sugar. Stir until it’s fully cooked and liquid comes out from the chicken and evaporates. Continue to stir until it looks dry, with no juice (it takes about 8 minutes). At the end, add about 1.5 fresh kaffir lime leaves, ripped. Transfer to a dish, top with thiny-sliced kaffir lime leaves and thinly sliced red chile peppers. Serve with jasmine rice. Enjoy!

Pad Krapao Moo (Pork with Basil)

2 Cups Pork Meat
5 Fresh Thai Chile Peppers
3 Fresh Japaleno Chile Peppers
2 Small Bulbs Garlic
1/2 Teaspoon White Pepper Powder
3 Cups Coarsely Chopped Fresh Thai Basil Leaves
2 Tablespoons Fish Sauce
1/2 Teaspoon Sugar

Pound jalapeno chile peppers in a mortar and pestle (don’t over-pulverize them).

Finely chop fresh Thai chile peppers and garlic.

Heat oil at high heat in a wok or skillet. Add garlic, jalapenos and Thai chiles, and white pepper powder.

After garlic becomes golden brown and fragrant, add the pork and fry until cooked.

Add fish sauce, sugar and fresh basil leaves. Fry for just a few minutes (or less) until the basil is cooked.

Remove from heat and serve over Thai jasmine rice.

Often served with a fried egg on the side. For added flavor you can add some oyster sauce (optional).

Pad See Ew

MARINADE

1 1/2 Tablespoons Freshly Grated Ginger
5 Cloves Garlic, Minced
1 Tablespoon Tapioca Starch
1 Tablespoon Rice Cooking Wine
1 Tablespoon Fish Sauce
2 Tablespoons Dark Sweet Soy Sauce
1 Tablespoon Oyster Sauce
1 Tablespoon Palm Sugar
1 Teaspoon Sesame Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Freshly Ground Black Pepper
1 Tablespoon Chopped Green Onions
1 Tablespoon Chopped Shallots

1/2 cups thinly sliced pork, beef, or other meat

16 Ounces Wide Rice Noodles
2 Tablespoons Sweet Dark Soy Sauce
2 Cups Broccoli Florets
2 Tablespoons Fish Sauce
1 Tablespoon Palm Sugar
1 Tablespoon Oyster Sauce
2 Eggs Beaten
1/2 Teaspoon Thai Pepper Powder

Marinade 1.5 cup ounces of thinly-sliced beef, pork, or meat of your choice in the marinade for about an hour.

Soak the noodles in warm water for 30 minutes then rinse in cold water. Add noodles to a pot of boiling water and boil for 1 minute, then rinse in cold water again. Our Thai cooking basket is a good tool to do this task.

Transfer to mixing bowl, separate the noodles and toss thoroughly with sweet soy sauce. Set aside.

Heat the wok and a little oil to stir fry the marinated meat until it just begins to cook. Add the noodles, cook quickly then add broccoli and stir again. Push the noodles and broccoli to the sides of the wok to open up the middle, then add beaten eggs. Spread the eggs a little cook for a moment. Just before the eggs set, fold all the noodles and broccoli together and stir well with remaining ingredients.

Transfer to serving plate. Sprinkle with Thai pepper powder and serve with prik dong (important to have prik dong on the side, and each person can spoon a little bit over their portion, depending on how they like it).

Drunken Noodles (Pad Kee Mao)

2 14 Ounces Packages wide rice stick noodles
12 Garlic Cloves, Chopped
1/4 Cup Chopped Fresh Thai Chiles
1 1/2 Pounds Ground Chicken
1/4 Cup Fish Sauce
1/4 Cup Black Soy Sauce
1/4 Cup Golden Mountain Sauce
1 Tablespoon Sugar
4 Large Plum Tomatoes, each cut into 6 wedges
2 Green Bell Peppers, cut into strips
1/2 Cup Fresh Thai Basil

Cook noodles in large pot of boiling salted water until tender but still firm to bite, stirring frequently. Drain.

Meanwhile, heat oil in a wok over medium-high heat. Add garlic and Thai chiles; saute 30 seconds. Add chicken and next 4 ingredients and saute until chicken is cooked through, about 4 minutes. Add noodles, tomatoes, and bell peppers; toss to coat. Transfer to large platter, sprinkle with basil leaves, and serve.

Khao Soi Meat Sauce (Lao Pork Sauce) for Soup

4 big cloves garlic
1 cup fermented soybean paste (actually 3 heaped Chinese soup spoons)
3 – 4 tablespoons (actually 2 heaped Chinese soup spoons) mild chilli powder, brightly coloured – not from bird’s eye chillies
3 – 4 tablespoons (actually 2 heaped Chinese soup spoons) coarser dried chilli flakes
750 g fatty pork such as belly pork, minced (3 big handfuls when minced), or a mix of pork and beef which is evidently especially delicious.
1 cup palm oil (or other vegetable oil, but not coconut, mustard or olive oil)
Salt to taste
MSG to personal taste
2 tomatoes, sliced in small wedges

Put the garlic cloves and ½ teaspoon of salt in a mortar and pound for a minute.

In a hot wok or frying pan, add the cup of oil. When heated, slip in the garlic mixture and fry while moving it about until the garlic is browned. Before it burns (!!), add about 1 cup of tua nao paste and stir to mix. Continue to fry together until the oil returns.

Add the two types of chilli and keep on frying, while moving the sauce around the pan.

Add the tomato slices and stir fry until the moisture comes out. The paste is ready when it smells good and the tomato has started disintegrating.

Add the minced pork, 2 teaspoons more salt (or to taste) and 1 – 2 tablespoons of MSG. (Remember, this is a very concentrated sauce expected to last a few days refrigerated (hence the oil, salt and pork fat) and to serve many people).

Keep on frying until the meat is thoroughly cooked then thin with water to a thick Western savory mince consistency. Then, um, add another tablespoon of MSG and stir to mix in. Continue to cook until the oil returns again and then transfer to a deep bowl to cool. In the cold, the fat in the sauce will solidify. It is the oil, chilli and reduced water content that preserves the sauce.

For soup:

Rice noodles

250 g pork bits

Half a pot of water (2 – 4 litres depending on how many people you have to feed, ours fed four with plenty left over. Don’t worry about the quantity because all the flavour comes from the sauce and condiments added later. This bland soup is to heat the noodles and cook the pork which is added to the dish when serving.)

Bring the water to the boil. Add the slices of fatty pork. Simmer away while preparing the accompaniments until the meat is cooked.

Accompaniments and garnish:

Finely chopped or sliced spring onions and coriander leaves, 1 tablespoon for each bowl being served

Pea or soy bean tendrils (or Chinese flowering cabbage), raw or blanched, to your taste

Lettuce, fresh

Coriander (cilantro), smallest you can get, roots removed, fresh

MSG or Soy sauce

lime wedges or juice

crunchy and feather-light beef rinds

Put two thirds of a bowl of noodles in each bowl and top it up with the boiling stock.

Add the pork, a good hit of the meat sauce (1 very heaped Chinese spoonful, 3 – 4 level tablespoons) and sprinkle over the chopped spring onion and coriander.

Each bowl is served piping hot and ready to doctor with any or all of the condiments and additional spicy meat sauce.

Mee Goreng

oil, for the pan
2 eggs
salt and freshly ground pepper
3 tablespoons kecap manis
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon sesame or shallot oil
1-2 teaspoons chili sauce
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
2 cloves garlic
1 large boneless skinless chicken thigh, cut into 1 inch pieces
2 links Chinese sausage, sliced
1/2 lb shrimp
1 lb fresh egg noodles (or cooked dried noodles)
2 cups bean sprouts
green onions/chives, cut into 2 inch lengths
tofu puffs
crispy shallots
fresh cilantro
thai chili
lime

Start off by making the egg ribbons. Lightly beat the eggs in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Heat a small non-stick frying pan on medium low heat. Add a touch of oil and swirl to coat. Pour in a thin layer of egg and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan, much like a crepe. Cook, untouched over low heat until egg sets and releases. Use a rubber spatula to flip and cook for another 10-15 seconds. Remove from the pan and repeat until all the eggs are cooked. Let cool slightly, roll and slice into ribbons.

In a small bowl, mix together the kecap manis, soy sauce, oyster sauce, ketchup, sesame oil, chili sauce and white pepper. Set aside.

Heat up a generous amount of oil in a wok or large frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until aromatic. Turn the heat up a bit and add the chicken and cook until lightly golden. Add the Chinese sausage and shrimp. Cook, stirring often, until the chicken is cooked through, the Chinese sausage is crispy, and the shrimp is cooked. Add the noodles, bean sprouts, tofu puffs, and the sauce and toss until everything is well coated and the noodles are heated through.

Enjoy immediately topped with crispy shallots and cilantro. Serve with lime for squeezing and chili for spice!