Zha Jiang Mian Fried Soy Noodles with Pork

1/2 carrot
1/2 cucumber
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp ginger, minced
10.5 oz ground pork, 600g
1 tbsp Shao Hsing rice wine
3 tbsp soybean paste (ground bean or broad bean paste)
1 1/2 tbsp tianmianjiang paste (sweet bean or sweet wheat paste)
1 1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tsp sugar
1 tbsp dark soy sauce
3 servings cooked wheat noodles tossed with sesame oil
1 tbsp spring onion, chopped to rounds
3 raw garlic cloves (optional)
3 tbsp roasted peanuts (optional)

Directions:
Wash and slice cucumber into 1/8″ thick matchsticks 2″ long. Wash and peel carrot, then slice into 1/8″ thick matchsticks 2″ long. Boil 3″ water in medium pot. When water boils blanch carrot for 1 min. Remove carrots and let cool. Keep the water in pot for use later to heat up noodles.

Heat wok over medium heat until hot, add 2 tbsp oil. Add in minced garlic and ginger, stir for a few seconds, then add in the pork. Use a spatula to stir, add in rice wine and break up the ground pork as it cooks. After 2 mins or when the pork is completely cooked add in soybean and tianmianjiang pastes, water, sugar, and dark soy sauce. Stir to mix, cover and turn heat to low. Simmer for 10-12 mins or until the sauce thickens and is glossy.

If using fresh noodles warm by heating up the water in the pot again. When water boils add in the noodles for 1- 2 minutes or until warmed and loosened then pour noodles into a strainer. If using dried noodles cook according to the package instructions. Separate cooked noodles equally into noodle bowls. For each bowl of noodles scoop 1/2 cup fried sauce over then add a handful each of cucumber and carrots. Sprinkle spring onion over all. Add raw garlic and peanuts if using. Ready to serve!

Notes: You could add in or substitute the carrots and cucumber with any vegetable you think would tasty good, like mung bean sprouts, soybean sprouts, edamame, radish, or even toss on some thinly sliced dried tofu.

Fried Loh See Fun (Pin Noodles with Pork and Salty Radish)

6 oz ground pork / minced pork (225g)
2 tbsp soy sauce
1/4 tsp ground pepper
1 packet rice pin noodles (15oz/425g)
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic (minced)
1 packet salted spicy radish (3.5oz/100g)
1 tsp dark soy sauce
8 oz bean sprouts (trimmed) (225g)
2 green onions (finely sliced)

Combine ground pork with 1 tablespoon soy sauce and ground pepper. Set aside.

Place rice pin noodles in a microwavable dish. Microwave on high for 2 minutes. Remove and loosen up noodles with a fork. Set aside.

Heat vegetable oil in a wok or large fry pan. Add marinated ground pork and stir fry for 2 to 3 minutes.

Add minced garlic, followed by salted spicy radish. Stir fry for another 2 minutes.

Add prepared rice pin noodles, remaining 1 tablespoon soy sauce, and the dark soy sauce. Continue to stir fry until all ingredients are well mixed.

Finally, add bean sprouts and stir fry for 20 to 30 seconds. Turn off the stove.

Transfer to individual plates and sprinkle sliced green onions on the top. Serve immediately.

Stir-Fried Mee Tai Mak (Pin Noodles with Shrimp and Pork)

1 lb mee thai mak noodle/ Vietnamese Ban Bot Loc noodles
3 Tbsp cooking oil
8 oz large shrimp peeled and deveined
2 oz minced pork marinade with 1 Tbsp of soy sauce, pinch of sugar
2 eggs
3 cloves garlic peeled and finely chopped
3 to 4 small bunches of yu choy/A choy/Choy Sum trim large stalks into smaller pieces

SEASONINGS:
4 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp dark soy sauce
1/4 tsp white pepper powder

GARNISHES
1 stalk green onion finely chopped
Fried shallots crisp optional

The noodles are hard when it is cold or refrigerated but will soften when heated. Briefly blanch the noodles in a boiling water for about 1 minute or you can just microwave them for 30 seconds or so. Set aside.

Heat up the wok/skillet with oil. Add shrimp and cook until they turn pink and cooked through. Dish out. Add garlic and stir fry for 10 seconds. Add the minced pork and stir fry and kinda break them apart and cook until they just turn color, about 2 minutes.

Push the meat to the side and break in two eggs and let them cook for about 1 minute before breaking them up lightly with a spatula.

Add the vegetables and stir fry until they are started to wilt but still has that fresh green colors.

Add the rice pin noodles and seasonings and continue to stir-fry for another minute or so until the noodles pick up the dark brown color from the seasonings. Add the shrimp back in and stir everything to mix.

Have a taste and add soy sauce if needed. Turn off heat. Garnish with some chopped green onion and fried shallots crisp and served immediately.

Stir Fried Nian Gao Rice Cakes with Pork

3 cups Nian Gao Rice Cakes (sliced to 1/4″ slices)
20 Baby Bok Choy
1/4 lb pork, rump or shank (140 g)
1 1/2 tbsp light soy sauce
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp Shao Hsing Rice Wine
1/4 tsp white pepper
1/2 tsp sesame oil
1 tsp corn or potato starch
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp concentrated chicken stock essence or 1 cup chicken stock
1 tbsp corn or potato starch

Soak the Nian Gao Rice Cakes for 3-4 hours. Slice to 1/4″ slices if not sliced already.

Slice the pork against the grain into matchsticks or thin slices and then marinate for at least 1/2 hour with soy sauce, sugar, wine, pepper, sesame oil and starch.

Wash baby bok choy carefully, changing water several times as there usually is sand. Slice the boy choy in half for more bit sized pieces.

Heat wok. Add 2 tsp oil. Add pork slices, spread out and let brown for a half a minute, then give it a good stir. Remove to a plate.

Add 2 tbsp oil to medium high heated wok. Add the bok choy and salt, then quickly add the rice cakes in a layer over the bok choy, cover and turn down heat to low. Cook until the rice cakes are soft (a few minutes). Check occasionally and add a bit of water if too dry.

When rice cakes have softened, add chicken essence and 1 cup water or chicken stock. Stir to mix, then cover and cook at low heat for 2 minutes. Make sure to poke at the Nian Gao to separate pieces if they start sticking together.

Add the pork in and stir. Mix your 1 tbsp of starch with 2 tbsp of water, give it a big stir and add to your wok. Stir immediately, watching the sauce to check the thickness. The sauce should cling lightly on everything. Turn off the heat immediately and serve.

(Adapted to omit mushrooms)

Shanghai Pork Chop Noodles

4 pork chops
1 tsp white pepper
2 tsp shao hsing rice wine
2 tbsp soy sauce
2 tsp sugar
1/2 cup flour
1 tsp five spice powder
12 oz shanghai noodles, 340g
1 liter chicken stock
4 tbsp spring onion, cut to rounds

Marinate the pork chops in white pepper, rice wine, soy sauce, sugar for 20 mins.

While meat is marinating prepare a big pot of water. When water is boiling, add in noodles, stirring to prevent noodles sticking together and cook for 4 mins. Remove and rinse noodles under cool water. Let drain.

Dump out water and refill pot with chicken stock. Heat stock until just boiling.

Heat 1/4″ of oil in pan wide enough to fit pork chops. Mix flour and five spice powder in shallow plate, dredge the pork chops in flour and shake off any excess flour. Fry the pork chops until golden brown on bottom. Flip over and repeat. Remove and place on kitchen to soak off excess oil. When cool enough to touch, slice into 3/4″ thick slices.

Separate noodles equally into four noodle bowls. Pour hot stock into each bowl, sprinkle handful of spring onions over noodles and place sliced pork chop on top. Serve hot and enjoy!

Asian Sweet and Sour Meatballs (Pork or Chicken)

12 oz ground pork or ground chicken
1/2- inch piece peeled ginger finely minced
2 cloves garlic finely minced
1/4 teaspoon five-spice powder optional
1 teaspoon sesame oil
3 dashes ground white pepper
Pinch of salt
Oil for pan-frying
1/2 small onion quartered

Sweet and Sour Sauce:
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons Thai sweet chili sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese rice vinegar or Apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
2 tablespoons water
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch

Combine the ground pork or chicken with ginger, garlic, five-spice powder (if using), sesame oil, pepper and salt. Stir to combine well. Wet both hands with some water and shape into 24 meatballs. Set aside.

Heat up a wok or skillet with some oil, pan-fry the meatballs until they turn light to golden brown. Drained them on a plate lined with paper towels.

Clean the wok or skillet. Heat it up with a little bit oil. Add the onion and do a few quick stirs. Add the sweet and sour sauce and cook it until it’s thickened, then add the meatballs. Stir to coat well with the sauce. Dish out and serve immediately.

Stir-Fried Nian Gao Rice Cakes

INGREDIENTS:
1 lb Chinese or Korean Rice Cake 450 gr
2 Tbsp cooking oil divided
3 cloves garlic finely chopped or grated
8 oz boneless chicken thighs/breast 250 gr, cut into thin strips (see notes)
5 oz Napa Cabbage 150 gr, cut into large chunks or shred
3.5 oz baby bok choy 100 gr
1/4 cup chicken broth

MARINADE FOR MEAT:
1 tsp soy sauce
1 tsp oyster sauce
1/4 tsp sugar
1 tsp cornstarch

SEASONINGS:
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 Tbsp shaoxing wine
1/2 tsp sugar

GARNISH:
2 stalks green onion finely chopped

PREPARE THE RICE CAKES:
If you get the refrigerated rice cakes or dried rice cakes, soak them in the water for at least 2 hours (overnight for dried rice cakes). If you use frozen ones, thaw in the refrigerator and then soak.

Drain off the soaking water and the rice cakes are ready to be used.

MARINATE THE MEAT:
Place the chicken or meat of your choice in a mixing bowl along with the marinade ingredients and marinade for 30 minutes or overnight in the refrigerator.

COOKING:
Preheat a large skillet or wok over high heat. Add 1 Tbsp cooking oil and swirl to cover the base of the skillet or wok. Add chicken and stir fry until the chicken pieces turn opaque and cook through. Dish out the cooked chicken.

Wipe the wok clean if necessary. Bring the skillet/wok back to high heat. Add another 1 Tbsp of cooking oil. Add garlic and stir fry for about 20 seconds. Add the napa cabbage and stir fry for about 2-3 minutes. Add bok choy and stir fry another minute.

Add rice cakes, seasonings, and broth. Give them a quick stir. Cover with a lid and cook for about 3 minutes or until the rice cakes soften.

Uncover the lid and give it a good stir to mix everything. Add the chicken back into the skillet/wok and give it a stir. Have a taste and add more soy sauce as needed.

Garnish with chopped green onion and serve warm.

Notes: This recipe uses plain nian gao log that is cut into slices. They don’t have any taste on its own and are meant for stir-fries or “noodle” soup. They are similar to the Korean Tteokguk rice cakes. Both made with sticky rice flour. (The Korean version is usually available at Wegmans in the refrigerator section.) Notice that they are labeled as “Rice Cake”, but actually they are made with both sticky/glutinous rice and regular rice flour (though more of the glutinous rice flour in composition). Once refrigerated, the rice cakes loose their elasticity completely. They will have turned hard like a rock. Soak in water for at least 2 hours or you can soak overnight. If you get the frozen version, thaw first and then soak. There is also a dried version, which also requires soaking overnight in the water.

You can use any protein of your choice like ground meat, or slices of beef or pork loin. This dish is also perfect to use any leftover turkey or rotisserie chicken. You can also opt for meatless protein like using extra-firm tofu slices.

Bun Thit Nuong (Vietnamese Grilled Pork and Noodles)

INGREDIENTS:
1 lb dry rice vermicelli noodle

THIT NUONG:
2 lbs pork shoulder/butt
1/3 cup chopped lemongrass
2 shallots finely chopped
2 cloves garlic peeled and finely chopped
1 Tbsp dark soy sauce
3 Tbsp sugar
3 Tbsp fish sauce
Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

FISH SAUCE DIPPING SAUCE / NUOC MAM CHAM:
3 Tbsp sugar
1/4 cup hot water
3 Tbp fish sauce
Juice of 1 lime
1 red chili seeded if you like and finely chopped

SERVE WITH:
1 large cucumber peeled, seeded, and julienned
lettuce leaves shredded
Do Chua
1/2 cup roasted peanuts chopped
Fresh Vietnamese perilla (tia to)
Mint leaves

Rice Noodles with Chili Bean Sauce

300 gr fresh/refrigerated flat rice noodles or dried flat rice noodles
2 Tbsp cooking oil
2 cups snap peas trim both ends

AROMATICS:
1- inch knob of ginger peeled and finely minced
1 medium onion peeled, quartered and separate

SEASONINGS:
2 Tbsp chili bean sauce (dou ban jiang) or more, adjust the amount of other seasoning
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1 Tbsp dark soy sauce
1 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 tsp sugar

PREPARE THE NOODLE AND SEASONINGS:
If using dried rice noodles, soak in water for at least 2 hours. If you are using refrigerated sheets of rice noodles, they come in one large sheet or pre-cut. Microwave them for about 1 minute and then cut (if you need to) and then separate and loosen the noodle.

Mix all the ingredients for seasonings in a bowl and set aside.

Preheat your wok or skillet until very hot. You should see some smoke started to rise. Add in 2 Tbsp of the cooking oil. Add the aromatics and stir fry for about 30 seconds. Push them to the side and then crack in two eggs. Let them cook until the bottom started to settle and then scramble the yolk and break the eggs into large chunks and continue to stir fry for few seconds.

Add sugar snap peas and stir fry for about 3-4 minutes until they are soft but still have some crunch.

Add the rice noodles along with the seasonings. Stir to mix everything. The amount of seasonings may vary according to your taste buds. You may need to add more soy sauce to your taste. Stir to mix everything. The noodles will start to soften. It may take longer if you use dry noodles. Have a final taste and add more seasonings as needed. Dish out and serve immediately.

Notes: You can use other greens like brocollini, broccoli, bok choy, yu choy, mung bean sprouts.

You can also add in slices of beef, chicken, pork, or even seafood. Just remember to cook the seafood or meat first and then dish out to preven overcooking.

Kwe Tiau Radna (Thai Rice Noodles with Sauce)

2 lbs fresh rice noodle or Fresh noodle Sheets or 1 lb of wide dried rice noodles
1/4 cup peanut or vegetable oil
2 to 3 Tbsp minced garlic
Scant 1/2 lb boneless pork butt or shoulder , thinly sliced across the grain into 1-by 1/2-inch pieces (or substitute lean beef or boneless chicken, sliced similarly)
1 tsp sugar
1 lb of Chinese broccoli (Gai Lan), cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch wide spears and well washed (3 to 4 cups loosely packed)
1 Tbsp fermented soybean paste (dao jiao/dao jio), mashed until smooth
1 Tbsp soy sauce
1 1/2 Tbsp fish sauce
1 1/2 Tbsp rice or cider vinegar
1 1/4 cups mild chicken , beef, or pork borth or water
1 Tbsp cornstarch , dissolved in 3 Tbsp water
Generous grinding of white or black pepper

CHILI VINEGAR SAUCE (1/2 CUP):
1/2 cup rice vinegar
2 to 3 Tbsp sugar
1/2 mild chile (such as Cubanelle, Hungarian wax, or banana chile), I used 10-15 bird’s eye chiles, sliced into rings)

If using fresh rice noodles, rinse under warm running water. Stack the sheets, if using, slice into 3/4-inch-wide noodles, and separate gently with your fingers; set aside. If using dried rice noodles, soaking warm water for 30 minutes to soften, then drain and set aside.

Place all the other ingredients by your counter top near the stove. Have a platter and 3 or 4 dinner plates (one per person) nearby.

Heat a large work over high heat. Pour in 1 1/2 Tbsp of the oil and swirl to coat the wok. When very hot, toss in approximately half the noodles and stir-fry gently for about 2 minutes, pressing them against the hot pan, then turn out onto the platter and repeat with the remaining noodles, using only 1 Tbsp oil. Divide the noodles among the four dinner plates.

Wipe out the wok, then place back over high heat. Add the remaining 1 1/2 Tbsp oil and, when it is hot, toss in the garlic. Stir-fry briefly until starting to turn golden, about 20 seconds, then add the pork slices and a generous pinch of the sugar. Stir-fry for about 1 minutes, or until all the meat has changed color. Toss in the sliced greens and stir-fry, pressing the vegetables against the hot sides of the wok, until they turn bright green, about 1 1/2 minutes or more (depending on the size of your wok).

Add the soybean paste, soy sauce, fish sauce, vinegar, and the remaining scant teaspoon sugar and stir-fry to mix, then add the broth or water and the cornstarch mixture. Stir to mix, then cover for 30 seconds to a minute, until the liquid comes to a boil. Remove the cover and simmer, stirring carefully from time to time, for another 2 minutes, or until the liquid has thickened a little and the greens are tender.

Use your spatula or a ladle to distribute the meat, greens, and gravy over the noodles. Grind pepper over generously and serve hot, with a bowl or cruet of the chile-vinegar sauce.

Put the vinegar in a small bowl and stir in the sugar until it is completely dissolved. Add the chile rings. Serve with a small spoon so guests can spoon a little onto their noodles. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator, this will keep for 4 to 5 days.

Khao Tom (Thai Congee)

PORK BALLS (MAKES ABOUT 30 SMALL BALLS)
8 oz ground pork
3 cloves of garlic finely minced
Small bunch of cilantro stems finely chopped
1/2 tsp of salt
1/2 tsp of freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp of fish sauce
1 large egg white beat until frothy

RICE SOUP
8 cups of chicken broth
1 stalk lemon grass bruised to release flavor by smashing with side of cleaver/knife
1 small slice of galangal
4 cups cooked brown rice you can use white rice if you prefer
3 Tbsp soy sauce
3 Tbsp of fish sauce
1/4 tsp ground white pepper
Shredded left-over chicken meat optional
4 eggs room temperature before cooking

GARNISHES:
1- inch fresh ginger peeled and thinly sliced
2 spring onions finely chopped
1 handful fresh coriander leaves

SERVE WITH:
soy sauce
3-4 red chilli (finely chopped

TO PREPARE THE DAY BEFORE:
Cook the rice using rice cooker or stove-top according to the instruction on the package. Let it cool and then store in the refrigerator until ready to be used.

Prepare the meatballs by placing the pork in a large mixing bowl followed by garlic all the way to fish sauce. Mix with your clean hands and then gradually fold in the beaten egg white and mix again and start picking up the meat and throw it back into the side of the bowl and repeat this for few times. This will make the pork balls rather bouncy.

Wet your palms and start rolling the pork into balls. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and then drop the pork balls in there, batch by batch. They will float to the surface when they are cooked. Check to make sure they are no longer pinkish. If you make this the day before, store in air-tight container in the refrigerator.

WHEN READY TO COOK
Place the eggs in a pot and cover with water. Bring water to a rolling boil and then turn off the heat and cover and let them sit for 15 minutes. Discard water and set aside.

Bring chicken broth to a boil in a large pot. Add in the lemon grass and galangal and let it simmer for about 10 minutes. Add in the cooked brown rice and simmer briefly. Adjust taste by seasoning with soy sauce, fish sauce, and white pepper
Discard the lemon grass and galangal pieces.

Prepare four serving bowls. Gently crack one egg in the bowl and some shredded chicken meat (if using). Laddle the hot rice soup over each bowl. Garnish with coriander leaves, spring onion, and ginger. Serve immediately with a small dish of chilies doused in soy sauce.

Asian Pork Meatball Noodle Soup

1 lb angel hair/spaghetti/ramen or Asian wheat noodles/udon noodles
4-5 stalks of baby bok choy
1/4 cup goji berries washed and drained

PORK MEATBALLS:
1 lb ground pork (preferably with some fat)
1 Tbsp corn starch
1 egg yolk
1 tsp sesame oil
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar

SOUP BASE
6 cups chicken broth homemade or store-bought
2 inch piece of ginger bruised with heavy object
Small pinch of sugar
Salt to taste

GARNISHES:
1 stalk green onion finely chopped
Fresh cilantro leaves
Red chili oil optional
Fried shallots crisp optional

CHILI SAUCE (OPTIONAL)
4-5 Thai bird’s eye chili finely chopped
Soy sauce

Cook the noodles to al dente and then rinse with some cold water and set aside.

Blanch the baby bok choy in a boiling water for about 5 minutes and then refreshed with some cold water and set aside.

Place all the ingredients for meat balls in a large mixing bowl. Stir to mix everything. Roll into balls. Place them into the refrigerator while you are preparing the soup base.

Place chicken broth and ginger in a medium to large pot. Bring to a boil and then let it gently simmer for about 15 minutes.

Add the salt, and sugar. Have a taste, it should be savory with some tangy taste. Add the meatballs and boil until the meatballs float to the top. Add the goji berries and let them cook for about 1 minute. Turn off the heat.

ASSEMBLING THE NOODLE BOWL:
Portion out the noodles into individual serving bowl. Portion out the meatballs and sprinkle of green onions, cilantro leaves.

Generously ladle the soup with some of the goji berries over the noodles. Drizzle with some chili oil if using.

Serve with some chili sauce on the side if you make some. Tuck in and enjoy! You can even serve with some black vinegar on the side if you like it extra tangy.

Lau Shu Fun Medan (Breakfast Pin Noodles with Pork)

1 lb of Lau shu fun noodle (pin noodles)
2 Tbsp of grape seeds oil or oil of your choice
3 cloves of garlic (peeled and finely minced)
1 lb of ground pork
2 Tbsp of soy sauce or more to taste
1 Tbsp dark soy sauce
Dash of white Pepper
1 cup of chicken stock
2 tsp corn starch + 2 tsp water

SOUP:
4 cups chicken stock
Salt to taste
Pinch of sugar

GARNISHES:
3 stalks of green onion (finely chopped)
Small bunch of cilantro leaves
Crispy fried shallots

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Blanch the Lau Shu Fun noodle in a boiling hot noodle briefly until it turns soft and lightly translucent. Refresh with cold water. Remove and portion them into the bowls.

Preheat oil in a wok/skillet. Saute garlic until fragrant. Add in the pork and stir-fry until the pork turns color.

Add in soy sauce, dark soy sauce, dash of white pepper and continue to saute until the pork is cooked through.

Add in the chicken stock and bring it to a boil and then lower the heat and let it simmer for about 15 minutes. Have a taste and season with salt if needed.

Stir in the corn starch solution and cook until thickened. Turn off the heat.

Portion the meat mixture with some gravy over the noodle. Garnish with green onions and crispy shallots. Serve with the soup on the side and sprinkle some green onions on the soup

Zha Jiang Mian (Noodles in Bean Sauce)

1 lb dried/fresh Asian wheat noodles or fresh udon noodles
3 Tbsp cooking oil
1/4 cup finely chopped garlic
1 Tbsp finely chopped fresh ginger
4 Tbsp black bean sauce
1 small onion finely chopped
1 lb ground pork/beef/chicken
1/2 cup shaoxing rice wine/ dry sherry
1 cup chicken stock
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1 Tbsp of corn starch mix with 2 Tbsp of water
1 cucumber peeled, seeded and julienned
2 stalks green onion finely chopped
chili oil (optional)

Cook the noodles according to the instruction on the package and rinse with cold water and set aside.

Preheat a wok or skillet. Add in oil, garlic, ginger, black bean sauce, onion and saute for 5 minutes.

Add the ground meat and cook for 6 minutes and then add in the wine and stock. Bring it back to a boil and have a taste. Add more salt and pepper to your taste. Give the corn starch solution a stir and pour it in and the sauce will thicken slightly.

Ladle the sauce over noodles, top with cucumber and chopped green onion. Drizzle some chili oil for a bit of heat. Serve immediately.

Spicy, Tangy Noodles

1 lb of spaghetti/linguine/angel hair/rice noodles/egg noodles/ramen noodles/udon noodles

SAUCE:
1 Tbsp of sesame oil/garlic oil/truffle oil
2 Tbsp of store-bought red chili paste/black bean chili paste or more if you like it really spicy
4 Tbsp of Chinese black vinegar available at Asian grocery store
3 Tbsp of soy sauce/tamari or more to your taste

GARNISHES:
Fresh cilantro leaves for garnish
1 stalk of fresh green onions finely chopped
Fried shallots crips available at Asian grocery store

IF YOU WANT TO TURN THIS INTO A COMPLETE MEAL (USE ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING):
Soft-boiled/hard-boiled eggs
Pan-fried firm tofu cubes
Leftover rotisserie chicken
Grilled chicken/meat/seafood shrimp or crab meat lumps
Grilled/steamed veggies asparagus, broccoli, bok choy, etc

Cook the noodle as directed on the package. While the noodle is cooking, In a large mixing bowl, prepare the sauce by mixing all the ingredients. Stir to mix everything. Add in the cooked noodles (pan-fried tofu cubes, leftover rotisserie chicken or other protein of your choice if using) and tossed to make sure the sauce is coating the noodles. Have a taste to see if you like it. Add more soy sauce, or more chili paste if you prefer. It should be savory, spicy, and tangy. Garnish with some fresh cilantro leaves. Serve warm, cold or at room temperature.

Nasi Goreng

4 large eggs
2 Tbsp butter or margarine
1 tsp shrimp paste (optional)
3 shallots peeled and thinly sliced
4 cups cooked white rice it has to be at least room temperature or cold is fine too
2 cups leftover cooked meat shredded or diced
3 Tbsp Indonesian sweet soy sauce/ kecap manis
1 Tbsp soy sauce or more to taste
3 -4 Thai chili (optional)
1/2 cup green peas thawed if frozen
Salt to taste

SERVE WITH:
Fresh cucumber slices
Fresh tomato slices
Prawn/ Shrimp crackers
Crispy fried shallots / bawang goreng
2 stalks green onions finely chopped
Sambal kecap pedas (optional)

Make the fried eggs to your preference.
Preheat a wok or large pan. Melt the butter. Add shrimp paste (if using) and stir fry for about 1 minute.

Add shallots and stir fry for 3 minutes.

Add meat and chili (if using). Stir to mix everything.

Add the rice, kecap manis and soy sauce, continue to stir until all the rice grains pick up the brownish color from the kecap manis. Have a taste and season with a bit of salt to your taste if needed.

Garnish with the chopped green onion, sprinkle with crispy shallots / bawang goreng. Top with fried eggs. Put few slices of cucumber and tomatoes and some prawn crackers. Serve immediately.

Lort Cha (Cambodian Pork and Pin Noodles)

INGREDIENTS:
800 gr short rice noodle (banh bot loc) or known as rice pin noodles
8 oz pork tenderloin thinly sliced
2/3 cups hot water divided
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp cooking oil

MARINATE FOR MEAT:
1 tsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 Tbsp fish sauce

AROMATICS:
2 cloves garlic finely minced
4 stalks green onion separate the white and green part

VEGETABLES:
2 cups sliced cabbage
2 cups fresh bean sprouts

SEASONINGS:
2 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 Tbsp dark soy sauce
1 Tbsp fish sauce
1 tsp sugar

MARINATE PORK AND GET THINGS READY:
Place the pork slices in a mixing bowl. Add the marinade ingredients and mix with your clean hands. Cover and marinate at room temperature for about 15 minutes while you prepare other things.

Mix all the seasonings ingredients together in a bowl and set aside. Preheat a large wok or skillet that has a lid over high heat.

Separate the green onions into green and white part. Cut them into 3-inch pieces. Set aside.

COOK THE PORK FIRST:
When the wok/skillet is really hot. Add 1 Tbsp of cooking oil. Swirl the wok/skillet to make sure it covers the sides of the wok/skillet. Add the pork slices and let them cook undisturbed for about 1 minute and then flip to the other side and let them cook for another minute. Cook until you no longer see pink color and the pork is cooked through. Dish out to a plate.

COOK THE VEGGIES NEXT:
Scrape the bottom of the wok/skillet to remove anything that got stuck on the wok/skillet. Add another 1 Tbsp of oil. Add the garlic and the white part of green onion and stir fry for about 30 seconds.

Add the cabbage and stir fry to mix everything. Add about 1/3 cup of hot water. It will sizzle. Close the lid. We are going to steam the cabbage for a bit to soften them. Uncover after about 1 minute. Continue to stir fry until most liquid has evaporated.

Push the cabbage to the sides of the wok/skillet. Crack 2 eggs on the middle of the wok/skillet. Let them cook undisturbed for about 30 seconds and then scramble the yolks and continue to stir fry.

ADD NOODLES:
Add the short rice noodles followed by seasonings. Stir to make sure the sauce coats the noodles. The noodles may still hard and stick together, no worries. Once the noodles has started to pick up the color from the seasonings, drizzle in another 1/3 cup hot water. Cover with the lid for about 1 minute. This will soften the noodles.

Uncover the lid. Add the pork slices back followed by bean sprouts and green parts of the green onion. Turn off the heat and continue to stir fry to mix everything over residual heat. The bean sprouts are still crunchy but don’t taste raw anymore.
Serve immediately.

Vietnamese Rice Noodles with Lemongrass Shrimp (or other protein)

FOR THE PICKLED VEGETABLES:
1 cup finely julienned carrot
1 cup finely julienned daikon
2 teaspoons granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon rice vinegar

FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE:
3 tablespoons light brown sugar
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
4 tablespoons lime juice
3 tablespoons Vietnamese fish sauce, like Red Boat
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon minced or grated ginger
1 medium-hot red chile pepper, such as Fresno, finely chopped
1 red or green bird chile pepper, thinly sliced, or substitute half a thinly sliced serrano pepper

FOR THE SHRIMP AND NOODLES:
1 1/2 pounds shrimp, preferably wild, peeled and deveined
2 tablespoons Vietnamese fish sauce
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
3 garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons finely chopped lemongrass, pale tender center part only
1 pound rice noodles, preferably rice vermicelli
1 or 2 small lettuce heads, with the leaves separated, rinsed and patted dry
3 cups mixed herb sprigs, such as cilantro, mint, basil, watercress and tender celery leaves
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 scallions, slivered
4 tablespoons crushed roasted peanuts
Handful of bean sprouts (optional)

Make the pickled vegetables: Put carrot and daikon in a small bowl and sprinkle with sugar and salt. Add rice vinegar, toss well and set aside.

Make the dipping sauce: In a small bowl, stir together brown sugar, vinegar, lime juice, fish sauce, garlic, ginger and chiles. Stir in 1/2 cup cold water and let mixture sit for 15 minutes. (Leftover sauce will keep up to 3 days, refrigerated.)

Marinate the shrimp: Put shrimp in a shallow dish. Add fish sauce, brown sugar, garlic and lemongrass. Mix well to coat.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to boil. Turn off heat and add rice noodles. Soak noodles, stirring occasionally, until softened, usually about 7 to 8 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water. Leave in colander at room temperature.

Prepare a platter of lettuce leaves and herb sprigs for the table. Keep cool, covered with a damp towel.

Put oil in a wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. When oil is hot, add shrimp without crowding (work in batches if necessary). Cook for about 2 minutes per side, until lightly browned.

To serve, divide noodles among 4 large soup bowls, then top each with hot shrimp, pickled vegetables and a tablespoon or so of dipping sauce. Sprinkle with scallions and peanuts (and beans sprouts if using). Pass herb platter and remaining dipping sauce at the table, and encourage guests to customize bowls as desired.

Grilled or wok-seared pork, beef, or chicken are fine too.

Shanghai Noodle Soup

8 ounces (225g) pork shoulder or boneless chicken thighs, julienned
2 tablespoons water
1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon light soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
4 ounces dried wheat noodles
3 tablespoons oil
5 cups chicken and pork stock or just plain chicken stock
8 ounces (225g) leafy greens, coarsely chopped
Salt, to taste
Ground white pepper, to taste
2 scallions, chopped

Marinate the julienned pork (or chicken thighs) with 2 tablespoons water, 1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon light soy sauce, 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil, and 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch for 15 minutes.

Cook the noodles in a pot of boiling water per the cooking instructions on the package. Drain and set aside. At this point, you can cut the noodles a few times by running a knife or scissors through them so they’re spoon-friendly, but this is optional. The reason for pre-cooking the noodles separately is to prevent the soup from becoming too starchy.

Preheat your wok or thick-bottomed pot until it just starts to smoke. Add 3 tablespoons oil, and cook the marinated meat until it turns opaque.

Add the stock and cooked noodles. Bring to a boil, and lower the heat to a simmer for 5 minutes, until the noodles are softened and expand slightly. Next, add the leafy greens and bring to a boil again. Add salt and white pepper to taste, and sprinkle with the chopped scallion before serving.

Kopitiam Noodles (Kon Loh Mee)

These are “dry” noodles. Despite the emphasis on the word “dry” to set it apart from the soup version, the sauce in Kon Loh Mee plays an instrumental part to bind all the good flavors and textures of the different ingredients together.

The sauce is a simple mixture of shallot oil, light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and sesame oil. For one serving, start with:

—1/2 tablespoon shallot oil
—1/2 tablespoon light soy sauce
—1/2 teaspoon dark soy sauce
—1/4 teaspoon sesame oil

Combine the sauce in a bowl, toss the noodles in, taste, and adjust the seasoning according to your preference.

The next step is to pick your noodles. Thin rice noodles (mai fun), flat rice noodles (kuey teow), and yellow egg noodles are the common options at a typical Malaysian hawker stall. Depending on my mood, You can also combine two noodles together in one bowl.

The springy wonton noodles, which fall under the egg noodle category, are a popular choice and available either in thin or wide. Soba noodles, ramen noodles, and even spaghetti noodles are fine too. As a rule of thumb, 2-3 oz (55-85g) of noodles is a good portion for one serving.

Hawker-style Kon Loh Mee is often topped with Chinese barbecued pork, wonton dumplings, meatballs, shrimp or minced meat, just to give you some ideas. If you’re avoiding meat, tofu and tempeh make good toppings here.

There’s also always some kind of Asian leafy greens included, like choy sum, gai lan, or bok choy. The greens are usually just simply blanched. Here’s what you do: Bring a pot of water with a pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt, and a small glug of vegetable oil to a rolling boil. Then add the greens. You know they are ready as soon as the water returns to a rolling boil. Remove the greens, drain, and add them to your noodles.

Finally, serve your Kon Loh Mee with a side of chilies. In a pinch, a simple chili soy sauce dip will suffice but if you have the time, pickled green chilies are the way to go.

You can use either jalapeno or serrano for a bit more kick. In a nutshell, the chilies are sliced, deseeded, and pickled in a mixture of white vinegar, salt, and sugar until they turn a lighter shade of green, which takes about 1 to 2 hours, but it’s preferable if you can wait overnight as they get better with time. I have the step-by-step guide for you here.

Oh, and don’t forget to top your noodles with crispy fried shallots from the shallot oil!