Sri Lankan Coconut Sambol

1 coconut grated
5 dried chilies
6 small shallots
2 limes juice of
1 teaspoon Maldive fish (Optional)
salt

Using a mortar and pestle make a paste with the dried chilies and a pinch of salt.

In a bowl, mix together the shallots, coconut, and chili paste.

Add the Maldive fish if using.

Add the fresh lime juice.

Add salt to taste.

Mix everything together and taste, adjust as your palate dictates. The end result should be sweet, sour, savory, hot, and a heavenly bite.

Serve alongside curry.

Cantonese Ginger Scallion Oil

Ingredients
2 scallions (must have white parts, 50g)
10 thin slices fresh ginger (20g)
1/2 cup vegetable oil (120 ml)
1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
light soy sauce (to taste; OPTIONAL)
Instructions
Wash the scallions and pat them thoroughly dry. Thinly slice them into rounds, and then use your knife to mince them further.
Next, slice 10 rounds of ginger very thinly. Julienne them into matchsticks and mince them finely. (These steps could be done with a food processor.)
Combine the scallion, ginger, oil, and salt in a bowl. Mix thoroughly, and it’s ready to serve!

Notes:

HERE’S HOW YOU CAN USE IT:

As a condiment to chicken or any meat of your choice – poached, pan-fried, or even grilled

As a dip for tofu, for our vegans out there

In cold noodles

As a flavoring or topping for leafy green vegetable stir-fries

Over plain rice with a fried egg, or fried rice!

If we are enjoying poached chicken (bai qie ji), we split it into two small bowls, and add light soy sauce to one of them to taste.

Strawberry Freezer Jam

1 box of Pomona’s Pectin
4-5 cups pureed or crushed strawberries, (about 2 1/2 to 3 pounds), crushed or pureed to desired consistency
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar (or honey)
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3/4 cups boiling water

Take out the small white packet of calcium powder and measure 1/4 teaspoon into a jar or container with a lid. Pour in 1/4 cup water. Shake well; set aside. The rest of the dry calcium powder can be stored indefinitely for later use.

Add the sugar and lemon juice to the strawberries and stir well.

In a blender, combine the boiling water and 1 tablespoon of pectin (in the large white packet). Process until smooth.

Add the warm pectin mixture to the strawberries and mix to combine. The mixture will start to jell and thicken.

Shake the calcium water to recombine and measure out 4 teaspoons; add to the jam. Stir well. (Extra calcium water can be discarded or stored in the refrigerator for months.)

Portion the jam into containers, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Seal with a lid. Store in the freezer (for up to a year) or in the refrigerator (for several weeks).

NOTES
Pectin: this recipe has only been tested and made using Pomona’s Pectin; other brands of pectin will not work the same in this recipe.

Sweetener: half sugar/half honey is delicious. And speaking of sweetener, you can cut the sugar down even more if you like, the minimum being 3/4 cup sugar or 1/2 cup honey.

Following the Recipe: you’ll have leftover pectin and calcium powder, simply fold down the tops of the packet or place in a small bag and store it in the Pomona’s box to use later. It won’t spoil. One box of Pomona’s Pectin will make three batches of the recipe below (so about 8-9 pints of jam, depending on amount of sweetener used).

Doubling: this recipe can be doubled.

Basic Sweet and Sour Sauce

1 tablespoon cornstarch (about 1/4 ounce; 7g)
1 tablespoon (15ml) water
2/3 cup (160ml) pineapple juice
1/3 cup (80ml) rice vinegar
1/3 cup (74g) light brown sugar
3 tablespoons (45ml) ketchup
1 tablespoon (15ml) soy sauce

In a small bowl, whisk together cornstarch and water. Set aside.

In a medium saucepan, combine pineapple juice, rice vinegar, brown sugar, ketchup, and soy sauce and bring to a boil over medium heat. Stir in cornstarch slurry and cook until thickened, about 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat and use immediately or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Quick Pickled Turnips

1 bunch hakurei turnips (approximately six, see note)
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
3 thin slices of ginger

Wash turnips well and slice them thinly on a mandolin. Place turnip slices in a small bowl and toss with the salt. Let rest until there is a pool of liquid on the bottom of the bowl, about 30 minutes. Drain turnips of the salty water and pack into a pint sized mason jar.

Add vinegar, sugar, pepper and ginger slices. Apply a watertight lid and shake to combine. Place pickled turnips in the fridge and chill before eating. Pickles can be eaten within an hour of being made and will keep for at least a week.

Alternative recipe:

Japanese Quick Pickled Turnips

Ingredients

5-6 small – medium turnips (9 – 10 oz.)
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tbsp mirin (sweet rice wine)
1 whole dried red chile
1 small piece of ginger – julienne
1 zipper bag

Wash turnips well especially inside of the leaves. Cut off the leaves about one inch from the top of the turnips. Peel and slice turnips into about 3mm thick. Cut the leaves into 4cm(1.5inch) long.

Put sliced turnips, a handfull of leaves and salt into a zipper bag and squeeze them to coat salt into all the turnips. Massage them for a few more minutes until the turnips soften.

Add the rest of the ingredients and massage them again. Seal the zipper bag and refrigerate at least 1 hour up to 6 hours.

Drain all the liquid and serve them in a small bowl. You can put some soy sauce on top when you eat.

Pickled Japanese Turnips

2 lb. Hakurei Turnips, cleaned and greens trimmed
3 cups Water
3 cups rice vinegar
1 1/2 Tablespoons pickling salt
6 Tablespoons sugar or 3/4 cup mirin – sweet rice wine
3-inch piece of ginger peeled and sliced thin

Heat a pot of boiling water enough to blanch the turnips. Combine the water, sugar or mirin, vinegar and salt and bring to a boil. Blanch the turnips for 30 seconds in the boiling water and remove.

Have hot jars ready. Add a few slices of ginger to them. Pack with the turnips just out of the boiling water. Pour over the pickling solution. Follow the canning directions below. The turnips should have a little crunch left in them after they are opened.

Can the jars in a hot water bath or keep in the refrigerator for up to a month.

Momofuku Turnip Pickle

1 pound turnips, peeled and sliced paper thin
2 (4-inch-by-2-1/2-inch) pieces kombu
1 cup rice vinegar
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup water
2 tablespoons kosher salt

Place the turnips and kombu in a 1-quart jar, leaving at least 1/2 inch of room at the top of the jar.

Make the brine: Place the vinegar, sugar, water, and salt in a small saucepan, whisk to dissolve the sugar and salt, and bring to a rapid simmer.

Immediately pour the brine over the turnips, making sure to cover them completely but leaving 1/4 inch of room at the top of the jar. Let cool to room temperature, about 1 hour.

Cover the jar with a tightfitting lid. Shake the jar or turn it upside down to evenly distribute the brine, then place it in the refrigerator for at least 1 day and preferably 1 week before using. (The pickled turnips can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 2 months.)

Japanese Spicy Pickled Daikon (with Korean, Chinese, and Indian Variations)

1 pound daikon radish
15ml (1 tbsp) table salt
125ml (1/2 cup) sugar
125ml (1/2 cup) apple cider vinegar
125ml (1/2 cup) water
30ml (2 tbsp) sea salt
2 red chillies, washed and finely sliced
60ml (4 tbsp) dill, washed and chopped
Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired.

Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.

Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and chillies in a saucepan and bring to a boil.

Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

Squeeze the excess moisture out of the radish.

Layer the vegetable along with sprinklings of dill in a sterilised, airtight storage container.

Pour in the pickling liquid, ensuring all surfaces of the radish are covered.

Wait for at least 2 days, but preferably 1 month, for the flavours to develop.

Variations:

Korean Pickled Daikon
You can easily turn this pickled dikon recipe into a kimchi-style recipe. All you need to make this a kimchi pickled daikon recipe is the chilli paste kimchi is made with. This includes the Sunchang Gochujang hot pepper paste. Just mix as much hot pepper paste as you see fit.

Chinese Pickled Daikon
You can easily make a Chinese-style pickled daikon. Simply add the following traditional Chinese ingredients and spices below, such as:

star anise
cloves
cassia or Chinese cinnamon
sesame seed oil
fennel seeds

You can also consider these additional ingredients:

cabbage
Korean radish
carrots
scallions
zucchini
gingergarlic
turmeric

Pickled Mooli
You can also make this an Indian-style recipe. Just add some turmeric powder or these turmeric substitutes. Next add ginger, curry powder, garam masala mix and fresh chillies or chilli paste. This way you can incorporate as much Indian flavour as possible.

Takuan (Japanese Pickled Daikon)

1 daikon radish
15ml (1 tbsp) salt
125ml (1/2 cup) sugar
125ml (1/2 cup) rice wine vinegar
5ml (1 tsp) ground turmeric
125ml (1/2 cup) water

Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired.

Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.

Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and turmeric in a saucepan and bring to a boil.

Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

Squeeze the excess moisture out of the radish and place the vegetable in a sterilised, airtight storage container.

Pour in the pickling liquid, ensure all surfaces of the radish are covered.

Wait for at least 2 days, but preferably 1 month, for the flavours to develop.

Malaysian Peanut Sauce

INGREDIENTS
1 cup dry roasted peanuts, unsalted
1 heaping tablespoon tamarind pulps
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 cup water
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
2 1/2 tablespoons sugar, palm sugar preferred
1 teaspoon coriander powder
1 tablespoon sweet soy sauce (Kecap Manis)
Spice Paste:

8 dried red chilies, seeded and soaked in warm water
3 cloves garlic, peeled
4 cloves small shallots or pearl onions, peeled
1 stalk lemongrass, cut into 3 strips, use only 1 strip at the bottom
1/2 inch galangal, peeled

Crush the peanuts with mortar and pestle or use a food processor to ground the peanuts. Set aside.

In a small bowl, add the tamarind pulps plus 1/4 cup warm water. Set aside for 15 mins. Squeeze and extract the juice from the tamarind pulp and discard. Keep the tamarind juice.

Chop the Spice Paste ingredients coarsely, transfer to a food processor and blend until very fine. Add a few tablespoons of water to help blending.

In a sauce pan, heat the oil on medium heat and add the spice paste.

Add the remaining two strips of lemongrass in the spice paste. Fry the spice paste until aromatic and smell spicy.

Add the ground peanuts, water, tamarind juice, salt, sugar, coriander powder and sweet soy sauce. Stir to combine well.
Reduce the peanut sauce on medium-low heat, stir continuously for about 5-10 minutes or until the peanut sauce thickens to your desired consistency, or until the oil and the peanut sauce separates.

Let cool at room temperature and serve with satay.

Chicken Khao Soi (Thai Coconut Curry Noodle Soup)

For the khao soi paste:
2 Thai bird’s eye chilies
2 medium shallots
6 cloves garlic
1-inch piece ginger (peeled and sliced)
1/4 cup cilantro (stems and leaves, rinsed)
zest of 1 lime
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon curry powder
2 tablespoons shrimp paste (Thai, filipino, or Chinese shrimp pastes will all work; can substitute laksa paste)

For the soup:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs (sliced)
2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste
4 cups low sodium chicken stock
2 teaspoons brown sugar
14 ounces unsweetened coconut milk
3 tablespoons fish sauce (or to taste)
1 pound fresh Chinese egg noodles (thick wonton noodles work well)

To garnish:
thinly sliced shallots
lime wedges
pickled mustard stems/greens
crispy noodles
chopped cilantro
Thai chili paste (Nam Prik Pao)

Add all the curry paste ingredients to a food processor and pulse until you get a smooth paste.

Heat oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil and stir-fry the chicken until browned. Remove from the pot and set aside. To the fat left in the pot, add the paste. Fry for 3-5 minutes, until fragrant. Add the canned Thai red curry paste, broth, and brown sugar, and bring to a boil.

Reduce the heat to low. When the broth is at a low simmer, add the coconut milk and fish sauce. Add the chicken back to the broth.

Meanwhile, cook the noodles according to package instructions.

To serve, divide the noodles among 4 bowls. Cover with chicken and broth, and garnish with sliced shallots, lime wedges, pickled mustard greens, fried noodles, cilantro.

Ultimate Chili Oil

2 tablespoons soy sauce
4 garlic cloves, grated
1/2 cup (50 g) Sichuan (spicier) or Korean (milder) chile flakes
1 star anise pod
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon curry powder
2 cups (480 mL) canola oil
3 tablespoons white sesame seeds
2 dried bay leaves
2 tablespoons finely ground Sichuan peppercorns

Mix the soy sauce and grated garlic together. Set aside.

Using a spice grinder, grind the chile flakes, star anise pod, coriander, cumin, and curry powder into a fine powder. In a large saucepan at least 6 inches (15 cm) deep, combine the spice powder with the oil, sesame seeds, and bay leaves. Set it over medium heat and bring the mixture to a gentle boil. Boil for 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until the chile flakes have turned maroon in color (but not black!).

When the chile flakes have turned to the desired color, turn off the heat immediately, then add the ground Sichuan peppercorns. Stir and let fry in the residual heat for about 30 seconds, then add the soy sauce/garlic mixture. The oil will boil up a little due to the added moisture (which is why we’re using a deep pot). Just keep stirring until the sizzling has died down.

Let the chile oil sit at room temperature for at least 2 hours (or best overnight) before using. Keep in an airtight jar in the fridge for up to 3 months.

Burmese Shallot (or Garlic) Oil

1 cup peanut oil
2 cups (about 1/2 pound) thinly sliced Asian or European shallots

Place a wide heavy skillet or a large stable wok over medium-high heat and add the oil. Toss in a slice of shallot. As the oil heats, it will rise to the surface, sizzling lightly. When it’s reached the surface, add the rest of the shallots (carefully!), and lower the heat to medium. (The shallots may seem crowded, but they’ll shrink as they cook.)

Stir gently and frequently with a long-handled wooden spoon or a spider. The shallots will bubble as they give off their moisture. If they start to brown early, in the first 5 minutes, lower the heat a little more.

“After about 10 minutes, they should start to color. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally to prevent them from sticking to the pan or to each other, until they have turned a golden brown, another 3 minutes or so.

Line a plate with paper towels. Use tongs or a spider to lift a clump of fried shallots out of the oil, pausing for a moment to shake off excess oil into the pan, then place on the paper towel. Turn off the heat, transfer the remaining shallots to the plate, and blot gently with another paper towel. Separate any clumps and toss them a little, then let them air-dry 5 to 10 minutes, so they crisp up and cool. (If your kitchen is very hot and humid, they may not crisp up; don’t worry, the flavor will still be there.)

Transfer the shallots to a clean, dry, widemouthed glass jar. Once they have cooled completely, seal tightly. Transfer the oil to another clean dry jar, using all but the very last of it, which will have some stray pieces of shallot debris. (You can set that oil aside for stir-frying.) Once the oil has cooled completely, cover tightly, and store in a cool dark place.

You can use a similar technique to make garlic oil, but slice the garlic thicker (a scant ¼ inch), rather than into thin slices, since it cooks much more quickly than shallots. Heat ½ cup peanut oil over medium-high heat, add ? cup or so sliced garlic, and fry over medium heat until just golden, about 5 minutes. Lift out the garlic and set aside to crisp up. Store the oil as above. Fried garlic does not keep as well as fried shallots; refrigerate and use within 5 days.

‘Nduja Mayo

1/2 cup (3 1/2 ounces; 100g) homemade or store-bought mayonnaise
2 tablespoons (1 ounce; 27g) ‘nduja (see note)
1 teaspoon (5ml) fresh lemon juice
Kosher salt

In a small bowl, stir together mayonnaise, ‘nduja, and lemon juice until well combined. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt as needed. Use right away or refrigerate in an airtight container until ready to use.

Stir-Fry Sauce for Any Meat and Vegetable

1 1/2 cups chicken stock (or vegetable or mushroom stock; 350ml)
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
1 tablespoon brown sugar (or granulated sugar)
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1/4 cup soy sauce (can sub gluten-free soy sauce or tamari)
1 1/2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce (or vegetarian or gluten-free oyster sauce)
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt

In a jar with a tight lid (must hold 2 cups of liquid), combine all of the stir fry sauce ingredients together and shake well.

This sauce should keep for a few weeks in the refrigerator; all you need to do is measure and pour out what you need for your dish.

Makes enough sauce for about 3 dishes. Nutrition info is for one out of twelve servings of sauce, assuming that there are 4 servings per dish

HOW TO USE THIS STIR-FRY SAUCE:

1. MARINATE YOUR PROTEIN:

Marinate 12 ounces of sliced beef, chicken or pork with:

2 tablespoons water
A pinch or more of baking soda (for beef only)
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch

2. PREPARE AROMATICS:

Mince 3 cloves of garlic, grate a teaspoon of ginger, and perhaps slice 1 or 2 scallions into 2-inch lengths.

3. SLICE VEGETABLES:

Prepare the vegetables ahead of time, slicing celery, carrots, bell peppers, snow peas, onions, mushrooms, zucchini, eggplant, and/or broccoli. Use whatever you like and make sure to cut the vegetables small/thinly enough so that they’ll cook quickly (i.e. a couple of minutes).

4. PREPARE YOUR THICKENER:

2 tablespoons water mixed with 2 tablespoons cornstarch.

5. SEAR MEAT:

Add 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to your hot wok (it should be almost smoking). Add the meat, sear on both sides, and set aside.

HOW TO USE THIS STIR-FRY SAUCE:

1. MARINATE YOUR PROTEIN:

Marinate 12 ounces of sliced beef, chicken or pork with:

2 tablespoons water
A pinch or more of baking soda (for beef only)
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2. PREPARE AROMATICS:

I like to cut my aromatics fresh, so I will mince 3 cloves of garlic, grate a teaspoon of ginger, and perhaps slice 1 or 2 scallions into 2-inch lengths if I have some.

3. SLICE VEGETABLES:

I’ll prepare the vegetables ahead of time, slicing celery, carrots, bell peppers, snow peas, onions, mushrooms, zucchini, eggplant, and/or broccoli. Use whatever you like and make sure to cut the vegetables small/thinly enough so that they’ll cook quickly (i.e. a couple of minutes).

4. PREPARE YOUR THICKENER:

2 tablespoons water mixed with 2 tablespoons cornstarch.

5. SEAR MEAT:

Add 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to your hot wok (it should be almost smoking). Add the meat, sear on both sides, and set aside.

Searing Meat in Wok, thewoksoflife.com

6. ASSEMBLE STIR-FRY

Add another tablespoon of oil and add the garlic and ginger. (If you also sliced scallions, you can add the white parts of the scallion at this stage.)

After a few seconds, add the vegetables and stir fry for 1 minute or until just softened.

Add about 2/3 cup of stir fry sauce (more or less depending on how much sauce you like), and heat until simmering.

And add in the seared meat.

Bring to a boil and stir in the cornstarch slurry until the sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon (you may need a little more or a little less cornstarch slurry depending on how much sauce you added and how high your heat is). Add the green parts of your scallions (if using), and cook for another 15 to 20 seconds.

Serve over rice.

Chinese Hot Mustard

1 tablespoon mustard powder
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon white pepper
1 1/2 teaspoon hot water
1/2 teaspoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon rice vinegar optional

Mix the dry ingredients together in a small bowl until evenly combined. Add water and stir well until a liquid paste forms and all dry ingredients are absorbed. Next, add oil and vinegar and stir well until evenly combined.

Let your Chinese hot mustard rest for 10 minutes covered, and re-stir to ensure the dry ingredients have fully absorbed. At this point, taste your Chinese Hot Mustard and adjust it to your own preferences.

Add a little more water or oil if you like a thinner in consistency. Add more vinegar if you like it a tad tart. Omit the vinegar altogether if you like it spicier, since vinegar makes your mustard a bit mellower in flavor. Add more white pepper and/or mustard powder if you like it spicier.

NOTE: Since Chinese mustard is so easy to make, we like to make in small amounts to have it fresh every time. Feel free to multiply the ingredients proportionally to make larger batches.

Green Summer Mole with Tomatillos and Pistachios

FOR THE SQUASH:
3 to 4 zucchini or any variety of summer squashes, cut into 1-inch pieces
Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling
Kosher salt and black pepper

FOR THE MOLE:
4 tablespoons grapeseed oil
1/4 small white onion, roughly chopped
1 small garlic clove, sliced
1 poblano chile, sliced
1 güero chile, banana pepper or New Mexico yellow chile, sliced
1 cup finely diced tomatillos
1 cup roasted shelled pistachios
1 cup fresh cilantro leaves
2 fresh or dried hoja santa leaves
1/2 cup baby spinach

FOR SERVING:
1 cup assorted greens, such as cilantro leaves, amaranth leaves or purslane
2 cups cooked white rice
Corn tortillas

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the squash on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and pepper and toss to coat. Roast until lightly brown, about 15 to 25 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the mole: In a pot, heat the grapeseed oil over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the chiles and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatillos and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, 5 to 8 minutes.

Add ? cup water and the pistachios and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and transfer to a blender along with the cilantro, hoja santa and spinach. Blend until smooth, about 3 minutes. Season with salt to taste.

Serve the mole warm, with the roasted zucchini. Top with greens and serve rice and tortillas alongside.

Tip
Leftover mole can be stored in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to a week. To reheat, add a bit of water and warm in a pot over medium heat.