Spinach Salad with Heirloom Tomatoes

2 cups cut-up heirloom tomatoes
1 cup multicolored cherry tomatoes, halved
2 cups fresh baby spinach
1/2 cup sliced red onion

DRESSING:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
1 garlic clove, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon dried basil
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/8 teaspoon rubbed sage

Place tomatoes, spinach and onion in a large bowl. Whisk together dressing ingredients; toss with salad. Refrigerate, covered, 2 hours. Serve with a slotted spoon.

Spinach Salad with Raspberries and Walnuts

1 large egg white
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups walnut halves
1/2 cup sugar

DRESSING:
1/4 cup canola oil
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1-1/2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1 teaspoon poppy seeds
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground mustard

SALAD:
8 ounces fresh baby spinach (about 10 cups)
1-1/2 cups fresh raspberries

Preheat oven to 300°. In a small bowl, whisk egg white and vanilla until frothy. Stir in walnuts. Sprinkle with sugar; toss to coat evenly. Spread in a single layer in a greased 15x10x1-in. baking pan.

Bake 25-30 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring every 10 minutes. Spread on waxed paper to cool completely.

In a small bowl, whisk dressing ingredients until blended. Place spinach in a large bowl. Drizzle with dressing; toss to coat. Sprinkle with raspberries and 1 cup candied walnuts (save remaining walnuts for another use).

Hot Spinach Salad with Apple

6 bacon strips, diced
1/4 cup cider vinegar
3 tablespoons brown sugar

9 cups fresh baby spinach
2 unpeeled large red apples, thinly sliced
1 medium red onion, chopped (about 3/4 cup)

In a large skillet, cook bacon until crisp. Remove to paper towels. Drain, reserving 2 tablespoons drippings.

In same skillet, combine vinegar, brown sugar and reserved drippings. Bring to a boil; cook and stir until sugar is dissolved. Cool slightly.
Meanwhile, in a serving bowl, combine spinach, apples, onion and bacon. Drizzle with warm dressing; toss to coat. Serve immediately.

Spinach Salad with Apples, Pears, and Nuts

8-10 cups baby spinach (or other greens)
1 apple cored and finely chopped
1 pear cored and finely chopped (instead of 1 apple and 1 pear you could 2 apples or 2 pears)
1/2 cup candied pecans (or walnuts, or other nuts)
1/4 lb crumbled feta (or goat cheese, or blue cheese)

Salad dressing:
4 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
1 garlic clove, pressed
1/4 teaspoon salt

In a salad bowl, combine greens, fruit, nuts, and cheese.
In a separate bowl (or blender) combine all the salad dressing ingredients (olive oil, vinegar, honey, dry mustard, garlic and salt) and whisk to combine.

Pour dressing over salad and serve.

Spinach and Strawberry Salad

1 lb. fresh spinach
1 cup strawberries, sliced
1/4 cup almonds
2 ounces feta cheese

Strawberry Dressing:

7 large strawberries, cut in half
Fresh lemon juice, from 1 lemon
Drizzle of agave nectar
Salt and pepper, to taste

Place the spinach in a medium bowl. Top with sliced strawberries, almonds, and feta cheese.

For the dressing, put the cut up strawberries in a blender. Squeeze lemon juice into the blender. Drizzle the strawberries with agave nectar. If your strawberries are ripe and sweet, you will only need a little agave nectar. Make according to your taste. Blend until smooth. Season with salt and pepper.

Pour dressing over spinach and strawberry salad.

Green Bean Casserole

2 pounds green beans
Kosher salt
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 pound cremini mushrooms, sliced, divided
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
4 large sprigs thyme
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups whole milk
1 cup heavy cream
4 garlic cloves, finely grated
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
Freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup French’s fried onions

Preheat oven to 375°. Working in batches, cook green beans a large pot of boiling salted water until bright green and halfway to tenderness, about 3 minutes per batch. Drain and let cool; trim stem ends.

Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Cook half of mushrooms, without stirring, until golden brown underneath, about 2 minutes. Toss and continue to cook, tossing occasionally, until browned on both sides, about 3 minutes more.

Add 2 Tbsp. butter and 2 thyme sprigs to pan. Cook, tossing occasionally, until butter browns and mushrooms are dark brown and very tender, about 4 minutes longer. Season with salt and transfer to a plate.

Repeat with 2 Tbsp. butter, salt, and remaining oil, mushrooms, and thyme.

Melt remaining 2 Tbsp. butter in a large saucepan over medium-low. Whisk in flour and cook, whisking occasionally, until roux is golden brown and smells mildly nutty, about 4 minutes. Whisk in milk and cream. Increase heat and bring to a simmer, whisking often, and cook until béchamel sauce is thick and bubbling, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk in garlic and Parmesan; season with salt and pepper.

Arrange green beans and mushrooms in a 2-qt. baking dish. Pour sauce over (it may not look like enough, but it will get saucier as it bakes). Cover tightly with foil and bake until sauce is bubbling, 25–30 minutes.

Uncover and continue to bake until casserole is lightly browned on top and around the edges, 15–20 minutes longer. Top with fried onions and continue to bake just until onions are slightly darker and fragrant, about 3 minutes.

Let sit 10 minutes to set before serving.

From Bon Appetit.

Cassoulet

Duck Confit:
6 duck legs
6 Tbsp. Diamond Crystal or 3 Tbsp. plus 2½ tsp. Morton kosher salt
4 sprigs thyme
4 garlic cloves, smashed
2 tsp. black peppercorns
1 tsp. juniper berries (optional)

Beans:
2 whole cloves
1 large onion, peeled, halved through root end
1 1/2 lb. dried Tarbais, corona, or cannellini beans, soaked overnight, drained
8 oz. pancetta (leave in 1 thick piece)
2 carrots, scrubbed, halved crosswise if large
1 head of garlic, halved crosswise
4 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
Freshly ground black pepper
Kosher salt

Pork Ragù:

1 1/2 lb. skinless, boneless pork shoulder (Boston butt), cut into 1″ pieces
1 1/2 tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt, plus more
Freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
1 large carrot, peeled, chopped
1 large carrot, peeled, chopped
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
4 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
1 14.5-oz. can crushed tomatoes
6 cups chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth
Assembly

Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
1 lb. fresh pork sausage (such as Toulouse, sweet Italian, or unsmoked kielbasa)
3 cups medium-fine fresh breadcrumbs, divided
1/4 cup finely chopped parsley
1 garlic clove, halved lengthwise
1 lb. precooked garlic sausage, sliced crosswise ¼” thick (optional)

Two Days Ahead

Cure Duck Legs

Prick skin on duck legs all over with the tip of a paring knife. Rub legs with salt, making sure to massage into flesh and skin.

Place legs in a large bowl and cover with plastic wrap, pressing directly onto legs. Rest a plate on top of legs and weigh down with several 28-oz. cans. Chill at least 12 hours and up to 1 day.

Note: If you’re going to cook the beans and ragout and combine tomorrow, soak the beans tonight. If not, just remember to soak them the day before you want to cook them.
One Day Ahead

Confit Duck Legs

Preheat oven to 250°. Evenly scatter thyme, garlic, peppercorns, and juniper berries (if using) across a large baking dish or roasting pan and add 2 Tbsp. water.

Remove duck legs from bowl. Rinse off salt and arrange legs, skin side down, over aromatics in baking dish. Cover dish tightly with foil and weigh down with a cast-iron skillet or a heavy baking dish. Bake until fat renders out of duck and legs are submerged, about 2 hours.

Carefully remove baking dish from oven and remove skillet and foil. Turn legs skin side up and nestle back into fat. Cover dish again with foil and continue to cook legs, unweighted, until duck meat is very tender and bones wiggle easily in joints, 2–2½ hours longer.

Let legs cool in fat until you can handle them, then transfer with tongs or a spider to a plate. Strain ¼ cup fat through a fine-mesh sieve into a small bowl and let cool. Cover and set aside for cooking the breadcrumbs. Strain remaining fat into an airtight container; cover and reserve for another use (like roasting potatoes).

Remove skin from legs, trying to keep as intact as possible; transfer skin to an airtight container. Cover and chill. Pull duck meat from bones, tearing into 2″ pieces; discard bones and cartilage. Place meat in another airtight container; cover and chill. You won’t need the skin, meat, or fat until you’re ready to assemble the cassoulet.

Do Ahead: Duck legs can be confited 3 weeks ahead. Transfer legs to a large nonreactive vessel; strain fat through a fine-mesh sieve over meat. Cover and chill. Let come to room temperature before using. Meat and skin can be prepared 3 days ahead; keep chilled.
Cook the Beans

Stick a clove into each onion half. Place in a large pot along with beans, pancetta, carrots, garlic, thyme, and bay leaf; pour in cold water to cover beans by 2″. Season with several grinds of pepper and bring to a gentle simmer. Partially cover pot and cook beans, skimming surface occasionally and adding more water as needed to keep beans submerged and seasoning with a couple of pinches of salt after about 30 minutes, until beans are tender but not falling apart, 45–60 minutes for cannellini and 1–1½ hours for Tarbais or corona. Remove pot from heat; pluck out and discard onion, carrots, garlic, thyme, and bay leaf. Transfer pancetta to a cutting board; let cool slightly, then cut into 1x¼” pieces. Add back to pot and let mixture cool.

Cook Ragout

Meanwhile, sprinkle pork with 1½ tsp. Diamond Crystal or 1 tsp. Morton kosher salt and several grinds of pepper. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven or other heavy pot over medium-high. Working in 2 batches, cook pork, turning once, until browned all over, 10–12 minutes per batch; transfer to a plate as you go.

Reduce heat to medium and place onion, carrot, and garlic in pot; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned, 8–10 minutes. Return pork to pot and add thyme, bay leaf, tomatoes, and stock. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, partially cover pot, and simmer gently, skimming fat occasionally, until meat is fork-tender, 1¾–2 hours. Pluck out and discard thyme and bay leaf. Let ragout cool slightly.

Combine Beans and Ragout

Using a slotted spoon, transfer bean mixture to pot with ragout. Add enough cooking liquid from beans just to cover. Pour remaining bean cooking liquid into an airtight container and chill; you may need it for finishing the cassoulet later. Let ragout mixture cool completely, then cover and chill at least 12 hours.

Do Ahead: Ragout and beans can be combined 2 days ahead. Keep chilled.
The Day Of

Temper and Season Ragout Mixture

Remove ragout mixture from refrigerator and skim fat from surface; discard. Cover pot and bring ragout to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat. Taste and season conservatively with salt and pepper if needed (the duck will add considerable saltiness when mixed in).

Prepare Sausage and Breadcrumbs

Remove reserved duck meat and skin from refrigerator. Let meat come to room temperature.

Meanwhile, arrange skin in a single layer in an 8-qt. Dutch oven or other heavy pot (the same one you’ll cook the cassoulet in). Cook over low heat, turning occasionally, until golden brown and crisp, 20–30 minutes. Using tongs, transfer skin to paper towels and blot away excess fat.

Prick pork sausages all over with a fork and cook in fat in same pot, turning occasionally, until browned all over and cooked through, 12–15 minutes. Transfer to a plate and let cool slightly. Cut into 2″ pieces.

Add breadcrumbs to pot and cook, stirring often, until golden in spots and starting to crisp, about 5 minutes. If breadcrumbs seem very dry or are sticking to the pot, add 1–2 Tbsp. reserved duck fat. Transfer breadcrumbs to a medium bowl and let cool slightly. Add parsley and toss to combine. Wipe out pot and let cool.

Layer Cassoulet

Rub inside of cooled pot with cut sides of garlic; ladle in one-third of ragout mixture. Top with half of pork sausage, garlic sausage, and duck meat, then another third of ragout mixture. Top with remaining duck meat and sausages, then remaining ragout mixture. Liquid should come to top of beans. Add reserved bean cooking liquid if needed.

Do Ahead: Cassoulet can be assembled 1 day ahead; cover and chill. Bring to room temperature before proceeding. Store breadcrumbs and duck skin separately airtight at room temperature.
Bake Cassoulet

Preheat oven to 375°. Scatter two-thirds of breadcrumb mixture over cassoulet.

Bake, uncovered, until a golden crust forms, 25–30 minutes. Remove from oven and use a spoon to break up crust, pressing very gently so crust absorbs a little liquid; smooth surface. Bake until another crust forms, 25–30 minutes; break up again. Repeat process 2 more times (for a total of 4 times). If mixture starts to look dry, moisten with a bit of reserved bean cooking liquid when breaking up the crust.

Top cassoulet with remaining breadcrumb mixture; bake until golden brown, 15–20 minutes. Let rest at least 25 minutes before serving.

Divide cassoulet among bowls; crumble duck skin over.

Source: Bon Appetit

Duck Breasts in Muscat and Orange Juice

1 cup Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise or ruby port
1 cup fresh orange juice
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Four 6-ounce boneless duck breasts, fat trimmed to 1/8 inch thick and scored
1 1/2 cups Enriched Chicken Stock
Salt and freshly ground pepper

In a large baking dish, mix the Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise with the orange juice, soy sauce, lime juice and olive oil. Add the duck breasts and marinate for 4 hours or overnight in the refrigerator.

Remove the duck breasts from the marinade and pat dry with paper towels. Pour the marinade into a medium saucepan and add the Enriched Chicken Stock. Boil over moderately high heat until reduced to 1/3 cup and syrupy, about 35 minutes.

Heat a large nonstick skillet. Add the duck breasts skin side down and season with salt and pepper. Cook the breasts over moderate heat until the skin is very crisp, about 5 minutes. Turn the breasts, cover and cook until the meat is rare, about 3 minutes. Transfer the breasts to a carving board, cover loosely with foil and let stand for 5 minutes. Slice the duck crosswise 1/4 inch thick and arrange on plates. Pass the sauce at the table.

Pomegranate Jalapeno Glazed Ham

One 7-pound, bone-in, spiral-cut smoked ham
1 cup chicken stock or low-sodium broth
20 whole cloves
One 10-ounce jar jalapeño jelly (1 cup)
1 cup sweetened pomegranate juice
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

Preheat the oven to 325°. Place the ham in a large roasting pan and add the chicken stock. Stud the ham all over with the cloves.

In a medium saucepan, bring the jalapeño jelly, pomegranate juice and lemon juice to a boil. Simmer over moderate heat until slightly thickened, 10 minutes. Whisk in the mustard, cinnamon and ginger and simmer until reduced to about 1 1/4 cups, about 5 minutes.

Drizzle half of the glaze over the ham and cover with foil. Roast for 1 1/2 hours, basting frequently, until a thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the ham registers 125°. Remove the foil and brush the ham with any remaining glaze. Roast for 30 minutes longer, until the top is lightly caramelized. Transfer to a platter. Discard the cloves. Pour the pan juices into a bowl and serve with the ham.

Horseradish-Crusted Roast Beef

One 6-pound sirloin tip roast, preferably grass-fed, tied
1/2 cup prepared horseradish
2 tablespoons kosher salt
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

Preheat the oven to 375°. Set a rack in a large, deep roasting pan and place the beef roast on the rack.

In a small bowl, blend the horseradish with the salt, Dijon mustard, chopped parsley, ground pepper, sugar and sherry vinegar to form a paste. Slather the paste all over the top and sides of the meat. Roast in the lower third of the oven for about 2 hours, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the roast registers 125°. Transfer the roast to a cutting board and let rest for at least 20 minutes.

Discard the string and thinly slice the roast beef across the grain. Transfer the meat to a platter and serve.

Serve with mashed potatoes

Make Ahead:

The unsliced roast beef can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. The sliced roast beef can be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated overnight.

Prime Rib Roast with Sage Jus

One 14-pound prime rib bone-in roast, tied
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
20 large sage sprigs
20 large thyme sprigs
8 bay leaves
8 shallots, peeled and halved
1 head garlic, cloves crushed, plus 4 cloves thinly sliced
2 cups water
1 onion, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons freshly cracked black peppercorns
1 cup dry red wine
5 cups beef stock or low-sodium broth
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Preheat the oven to 400°. Set the meat in a large roasting pan, fat side up. Season the meat generously with salt and pepper. Around the roast, scatter 10 sprigs each of sage and thyme, 6 of the bay leaves, the shallots and the crushed garlic cloves. Pour in 1 cup of the water and roast for 45 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 275°. Roast the meat for about 2 hours and 15 minutes longer, adding the remaining 1 cup of water to the pan as the juices evaporate. The roast is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 135°.

Transfer the roast to a large carving board. Pour the fat in the roasting pan into a large heatproof bowl, stopping when you reach the syrupy pan juices at the bottom. Pour the pan juices into a small bowl and discard the vegetables and herbs.

Set the pan over 2 burners and add 2 tablespoons of the reserved fat. Add the onion, peppercorns and the sliced garlic, remaining 2 bay leaves and 10 sprigs each of sage and thyme. Cook over moderate heat until the onion is softened, about 8 minutes. Add the wine and cook, scraping up any bits stuck to the bottom and sides of the pan. Pour the mixture into a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the beef stock and pan juices and cook over moderate heat until slightly reduced, about 15 minutes.

In a small bowl, whisk the flour with 2 tablespoons of the reserved fat. Whisk the paste into the saucepan and simmer the gravy until thickened, about 5 minutes. Strain the gravy through a fine sieve and keep warm until ready to serve.

Cut the bones off the roast and slice the meat 1/2 inch thick. Cut in between the bones and serve them on the side. Pass the gravy at the table.

Prime Rib Roast with Coffee Rub

1/3 cup finely ground coffee
2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped
One 12-pound, bone-in prime rib roast (5 bones)

In a bowl, thoroughly blend the coffee with the salt, pepper and vanilla bean seeds. Set the rib roast in a roasting pan and rub it all over with the coffee mixture, concentrating most of the rub on the fatty part of the meat. Turn the roast bone side down and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 450°. Roast the meat for 15 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 325° and roast for about 2 1/2 hours longer, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the meat registers 125° for medium-rare.

Transfer the roast to a carving board and let rest for 20 minutes. Scrape off any excess coffee rub. Carve the meat in 1/2-inch-thick slices and serve.

Make Ahead: The coffee-rubbed roast can be refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature before roasting.

Stewed Black-Eyed Peas

2 pounds dried black-eyed peas
1 sweet onion, such as Vidalia, peeled and halved through the root end (keep the root attached)
4 whole cloves
1 garlic head, cut in half
10 black peppercorns
2 dried bay leaves
1 chile de árbol or other small dried chile
1 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
Hot sauce, to taste

Put the peas in a large bowl, add water to cover by 2 inches, and soak overnight.

Blacken the onion: If you have a gas stove, turn one burner on high and place the onion halves directly on the grates next to the flame and cook, turning occasionally, until the onion is charred on all sides, about 5 minutes. Otherwise, heat the broiler and broil the onion on a baking sheet a few inches from the heat, turning occasionally, until charred, 1 to 2 minutes. Set aside to cool.

When the onion is cool enough to handle, poke 2 cloves into each half, and add the onion to a large stockpot. Drain the peas, discarding the liquid, and then transfer the peas to the pot.

Place the garlic, peppercorns, bay leaves and chile on a 12-inch square of cheesecloth and wrap tightly, using twine to seal the packet.

Add 6 quarts water and the spice packet to the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Skim any foam that collects on the surface, then reduce to a simmer. Stir in the olive oil and 1 tablespoon salt and cook, stirring and skimming occasionally, until the peas are fully cooked and the cooking liquid has thickened, 1 to 2 hours.

Discard the spice packet, season with the remaining 1 tablespoon salt (or to taste) and the hot sauce and serve.

Succotash with Mint and Goat Cheese

2 TABLESPOONS UNSALTED BUTTER
3 GREEN ONIONS, white and pale green parts and some of the dark green tops, thinly sliced
1 1/2 CUPS FRESH CORN KERNELS (2 medium ears)
1/2 POUND FLORIDA BUTTER BEANS, cooked and drained
SALT AND FRESHLY GROUND PEPPER
1/2 CUP HALVED CHERRY TOMATOES
2 TABLESPOONS CHOPPED FRESH MINT
1/4 POUND FRESH GOAT CHEESE

In a large saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter.

Add the green onions and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the corn and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the beans and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Remove from the heat, and toss in the tomatoes and mint.

Serve immediately, crumbling a little goat cheese over each portion.

Substitution Note: Try this recipe with Christmas lima beans or with fresh lima beans if you have them.

Pork, Pork, Pork, and Beans

Serves 6-8

1 pound Rancho Gordo Yellow Eye Beans
1 1/2 to 2 pounds bone-in Pork Butt (Shoulder)
5 slices Uncured Rustic Bacon, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch strips (lardons)
4 links Rustic Pork Sausage, cut on the diagonal into 1-inch pieces
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Mirepoix:

1 large yellow onion, coarsely chopped
2 large stalks of celery, coarsely chopped
1 small carrot, coarsely chopped
6 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
1 fennel bulb, coarsely chopped
14 ounce can diced tomatoes with the juice
1/2 cup dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc
5 branches fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
2 tablespoons lemon juice

Beans:

3 tablespoons olive oil
Sea salt, preferably Rancho Gordo Sal de Mar sea salt (from the Yucatan)
2 cups panko crumbs
8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Seasoning the pork butt: Remove the bone from the pork butt and cut the meat into 1 1/2-to-2 inch chunks. Season all sides of the meat with salt and pepper, and refrigerate it (uncovered) for a day.

Soaking the beans: Put the beans in a bowl and cover with 2-inches cold water. Soak the beans for 4 to 6 hours.

Begin the cooking: Put the bacon into a cold 5 quart enamel cast iron or other heavyweight Dutch oven and place the pan over medium heat. Cook the bacon from for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring from time to time, until the fat has rendered and the bacon is just beginning to color. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon to a bowl and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Mix the mirepoix vegetables together and reserve 1/2 cup for cooking the beans. Add the remaining vegetables to the pan and sauté in the bacon fat, stirring from time to time for about 10 minutes until the vegetables have softened and are just beginning to color.

Stir in the tomatoes and their juice. Add the wine, thyme and bay leaf. Tuck the pork chunks into the vegetables, leaving the top half of the meat exposed and put (uncovered) in the oven to cook for about 2 hours.

Cooking the beans (while the meat is in the oven):
Heat a medium size enamel cast iron or other heavyweight Dutch oven. Add the oil and the reserved mirepoix and saute about 10 minutes to soften.

Add the beans and their soaking water, adding additional water to reach 2-inches above the beans. Place over medium-high heat, cover and bring to a rolling boil. Continue to boil rapidly for 10 minutes, adjusting the heat as necessary.

Place the lid slightly ajar (to allow evaporation), and reduce the heat to cook the beans at a gentle simmer for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Add additional water as needed to be sure the beans are covered by 2 inches of water at all times; use the lid to control the heat.

After about 1 hour, the smell of beans should be pronounced and you can salt the beans at this point. Add 11/2 tablespoons of salt. Continue to cook until the beans are just tender.

Completing the dish: Once the pork is tender, remove the pieces from the pan. Remove the thyme and bay leaf and discard.

Put the cooked vegetables and any juices into a food processor. Add the smoked paprika, 2 teaspoons salt, a few grinds of black pepper and lemon juice and puree.

Drain the beans and put them in the Dutch oven. Stir in the bacon pieces and the vegetable puree.

Nestle the pork meat and sausages into the beans, leaving the top half of the meat exposed and return to the oven (uncovered) to cook for 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, put the panko crumbs in a bowl and stir in the butter. Remove the pot from the oven and sprinkle the panko over the top. Return to the oven for another 20 minutes or until the crumbs are a rich golden brown.

Pancetta, Corn, and Beans

1 tablespoon olive oil
3 ounces pancetta, cubed
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 yellow onion, chopped fine
4 ears of corn, kernels removed
1 tablespoon Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio
2 cups cooked Rancho Gordo Cassoulet or Marcella beans
2 cups water (or half water and half bean broth)
Salt and pepper to taste
Optional: 2 to 3 tablespoons heavy cream
Minced fresh flat-leaf parsley or cilantro for garnish

In a soup pot, warm the olive oil over medium-low heat. Add the pancetta cubes and saute over medium-low heat until tender and chewy, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent them from burning.

Add the garlic and onion and saute until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the corn, oregano, beans, and water, stirring to mix all of the ingredients. Raise the heat to medium and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender and the flavors have blended, about 20 minutes.

Season with salt and pepper. Right before serving, you can add some heavy cream if you like. Allow the soup to cook another 2 or 3 minutes to reheat if necessary. Serve in bowls, garnished with fresh herbs.

Bean and Vegetable Posole

1 cup dried Rancho Gordo White Posole (prepared hominy)
1 cup dried heirlooms beans such as Pinto, Eye of the Goat, Lila, or Moro
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1½ tsp. New Mexican Red Chile Powder
1½ tsp whole cumin seeds
3/4 tsp. Mexican Oregano
1 T. olive or vegetable oil
1 cup chopped tomatoes
3 small calabacitas (small squash) or zucchini, sliced ¼” thick
4 oz. fresh or frozen green beans
1 T. vegetable bouillon
2 T. chopped cilantro
Salt, to taste

Rinse and soak posole and beans, in separate bowls, for about 6 hours.

Drain posole and discard water. Add posole to a pot, fill pot with fresh water, and place over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and cook until tender, about 2 hours. Drain.

Meanwhile, pour beans and their soaking liquid into another pot and add more water if needed to cover beans by about 2 inches. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a low simmer. Cook until tender, adding water as necessary (timing will vary depending on type of bean).

In 4 qt. pan, saute onion, garlic, chile powder, cumin seed and oregano in 1 T. oil for 7 minutes until onion is soft.

Add squash and tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Stir in cooked beans and cooking liquid, posole, green beans and bouillon. Simmer 30 minutes, adding water if stew is too thick.

Add cilantro and salt to taste.

Serve with warm tortillas.

Summer Posole

1 pound dried Rancho Gordo White Corn Posole (prepared hominy)
1 large white onion, finely diced?
3 cloves garlic, minced?
1 1/2 teaspoons Mexican Oregano?
6 large New Mexico green chiles (or poblanos)?
1 bunch scallion, finely chopped?
1 cup cilantro, finely chopped?
1 teaspoon cumin seed, toasted and ground?
1 pinch sea salt?
1/4 cup olive oil?
1 whole avocado, diced into chunks?
4 whole corn tortillas, slivered?
1 cup cabbage, thinly sliced?
1 lime, quartered

Put the posole in a large soup pot with onion, garlic, oregano and a gallon of water. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer until tender. This can take as long as 3 hours, so check pot occasionally and add water as it boils away. The posole will swell considerably, and the kernels will split open.

While the posole is cooking, roast the chiles, then place them in a bowl and cover with a plate to steam for 15 minutes. Slip off the skins, pull out the seeds and chop. Add the chopped chiles to the simmering posole along with 4 teaspoons salt. Continue cooking until the posole is completely tender. Taste for salt.

Preheat the oven to 350F. To make the salsa, combine the scallions, cilantro, chiles, cumin and salt in a bowl. Stir in the oil, add water as needed to thin, and add avocado. Toast the tortilla strips in the oven until crisp, or fry them in vegetable oil.

To serve, stir the salsa into the posole and garnish with a nest of cabbage and tortilla strips and a wedge of lime. Accompany with warm tortillas.

Posole Blanco

For the broth:

1 whole chicken, cut into parts, including the back
1 yellow or white onion, sliced
4–6 garlic cloves, cut in half (skins on is fine)
3 bay leaves
3 stalks celery, roughly chopped
1 small carrot, peeled and roughly chopped
1 teaspoon Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 stick Rancho Gordo Canela/Soft Cinnamon
3 cloves
3 whole allspice
3 whole peppercorns
Salt

For the hominy:

1 pound Rancho Gordo Posole/Prepared Hominy, soaked for 6–10 hours
3 slices of white or yellow onion

For the Chile Manzano Salsa:

4 Manzano chiles, seeded and finely sliced
1 small red onion, peeled and finely sliced
1 tablespoon Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio
1/4 cup Rancho Gordo Pineapple Vinegar
1 teaspoon salt

For serving:

Chile Manzano salsa
Thinly sliced radishes
Shredded lettuce
Quartered limes (optional)
Fresh cilantro leaves (optional)
White onion, finely chopped (optional)
Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio or Mexican Oregano (optional)
Rancho Gordo New Mexican Red Chile Powder (optional)

Add the chicken to a large stockpot and add 2–3 quarts of water. Turn the heat to high. Once the water starts to boil, reduce to medium-low to maintain a gentle simmer. After about 5 minutes, check for scum on top of the water and remove with a small sieve or slotted spoon. Add the rest of the broth ingredients and continue simmering until the individual chicken pieces are cooked through. Remove the breasts after about 20 minutes; thighs, drumsticks and wings will take about 40 minutes.

Allow the chicken pieces to cool. Remove any remaining skin and shred the meat with your hands. Strain the broth and reserve. You should have one bowl of shredded chicken and one large amount of broth.

While the chicken cooks, in a large stockpot, combine the hominy, onion and 3 quarts of water and bring to a full boil over high heat; boil for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer gently until the corn kernels are tender, 2–3 hours. Once the hominy is cooked, strain it, reserving both the corn and the liquid.

For the salsa, in a serving bowl, combine all of the ingredients and toss well. Check for seasoning and add salt to taste. Let rest while the chicken and hominy cook.

When all the preparations are done, add the cooked hominy and shredded chicken to your pot. Add a total of 2 quarts plus 1 cup of liquid from the chicken broth and the hominy water (1 quart plus 1 cup of chicken broth added to 1 quart of hominy water is a good suggestion but some people prefer all chicken or all hominy).

Cover the pot and bring to a gentle simmer over medium-high heat. Once warmed through, serve in individual bowls and allow guests to dress up their bowls with radishes, lettuce and the Chile Manzano Salsa, along with whatever else you choose.

Posole Verde

Serves 6

1/2 pound Rancho Gordo White Posole (prepared hominy)
1 1/2 onions, white or red, peeled and halved
Salt
4 garlic cloves, peeled
15 to 20 tomatillos, paper skins removed
2 poblano chiles
1 serrano chile
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 cup coarsely chopped cilantro
2 teaspoons Rancho Gordo Mexican Oregano
1 1/2 quarts vegetable or chicken broth
Freshly ground black pepper

Soak posole overnight in water to cover generously. Drain.
Place it in a saucepan with fresh water to cover generously.

Add 1/2 onion, bring to a simmer, cover partially and cook at a gentle simmer until the corn kernels are tender, 2 to 3 hours; many will split open. Season with salt and cool in the liquid.

On a hot, dry griddle or skillet, roast the remaining halved onions, garlic, tomatillos and chiles, turning occasionally, until they are charred and slightly softened, 15 to 20 minutes. Work in batches if necessary.

Put the roasted poblano chiles in a paper bag to steam until cool.

Transfer the other vegetables to a bowl and let cool, collecting their juices.

Skin the poblanos, discarding seeds and stems. Discard the serrano chile stem but don’t skin or seed.

Put all the roasted vegetables in a blender, in batches if necessary, and puree until smooth.

Heat the oil in a large stockpot over moderate heat.
Add the vegetable puree and adjust heat to maintain a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes to blend the flavors.

In the blender, puree the cilantro, oregano and 1 cup of the broth. Add to the vegetable mixture along with 4 cups additional broth.

Drain the posole and add it to the pot. Season with salt and pepper and return to a simmer. Thin with additional broth if necessary. Serve in warm bowls.