Pina Coladas

1/2 fresh pineapple, peeled, cut into 1½-inch pieces
6 ounces sweetened cream of coconut (preferably Coco López)
2 ounces unsweetened coconut milk
8 ounces white rum
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 ounces dark rum (optional)
Maraschino cherries and lime wedges (for serving)

Place pineapple pieces in a resealable plastic bag, laying them flat. Freeze until solid, at least 3 hours.

Shake cream of coconut and coconut milk in their cans before measuring. Purée pineapple, cream of coconut, coconut milk, white rum, lime juice, and 3 cups ice (about 15 oz.) in a blender until smooth. Transfer blender cup to freezer and freeze until mixture is thickened (it should be the consistency of a milkshake), 25–35 minutes.

Blend again until mixture is the perfect slushy frozen drink consistency. Divide among glasses. Top off each with ½ oz. dark rum, if using, and garnish each with a cherry and lime wedge.

Do Ahead: Pineapple can be chopped 3 months ahead. Keep frozen.

From Bon Appetit

Key Lime Pie

Crust

14 graham crackers (about 1½ sleeves)
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, melted
4 tablespoons virgin coconut oil, melted
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Filling and Assembly

4 large egg yolks
1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
2 teaspoons finely grated lime zest, plus more for garnish
3/4 cup fresh key lime (or regular lime) juice
Pinch of kosher salt
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup powdered sugar
1 cup full-fat Greek yogurt
1 tablespoon dark rum (optional)

Crust

Preheat oven to 325°. Using your hands, crush graham crackers in a large bowl until coarsely ground (you could do this in a food processor if you’d like, just be sure not to process too finely; you want some texture in the larger pieces). Add butter, coconut oil, sugar, and salt and mix until well blended (mixture will resemble wet sand). Transfer to a 9″ pie dish. Using your fingers and the underside of a flat measuring cup, press mixture evenly into bottom and up sides of dish. Bake crust, rotating once halfway through, until golden brown on top and crumbs are set, 12–15 minutes. Let cool.

Filling and Assembly

Using an electric mixer on medium speed, beat egg yolks and condensed milk in a large bowl until paler and almost doubled in volume, about 5 minutes. Whisk in 2 tsp. lime zest, lime juice, and salt. Pour into cooled crust. Bake pie until filling no longer jiggles and is starting to slightly puff around the edges, 15–20 minutes. Let cool completely.

Whip cream and powdered sugar in a large bowl until stiff peaks form. Gently whisk in yogurt and rum, if using. Dollop onto cooled pie, creating dramatic peaks and valleys with an offset spatula or the back of a spoon. Garnish with lime zest.

Do Ahead: Crust can be baked 2 days ahead; pie without whipped topping can be made 2 days ahead; pie can be assembled (with topping) 4 hours ahead.

From Bon Appetit

Shrimp and Grits

Grits

1 cup yellow grits (not instant)
1 cup grated sharp white cheddar
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 jalapeño, seeded, diced
1/4 cup heavy cream
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Shrimp

1/2 cup 1/3′ cubes tasso, andouille sausage, or bacon
1 tablespoon vegetable oil (optional)
3 garlic cloves, sliced
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) butter, divided
16 large shrimp (about 1 pound), peeled, deveined
1/4 cup (or more) beer
1/4 cup low-salt chicken stock
4 large eggs
1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon

Grits

Bring 3 cups water to a simmer in a large saucepan. Gradually whisk in grits. Turn heat to low; gently simmer until grits begin to thicken. Continue cooking, stirring often and adding water by 1/4 cupfuls if too thick, until tender, about 1 hour. Stir in cheese, butter, and jalapeño, then cream. Season with salt and pepper. Keep warm.

Shrimp

Meanwhile, heat a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Add tasso; sauté until fat begins to render, about 5 minutes (if tasso is very lean, add 1 tablespoon oil to skillet). Add garlic and 1 tablespoon butter; stir until butter melts. Add shrimp. When garlic begins to brown, add beer and chicken stock. Simmer until shrimp is cooked through, about 2 minutes. Remove skillet from heat; set aside.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add remaining 1 tablespoon butter to skillet; swirl to melt and cover bottom of pan. Crack eggs into pan and cook until whites are just set but yolks are still runny, about 3 minutes.

Divide grits among bowls, forming a well in center. Spoon shrimp mixture into center of grits. Top with egg. Sprinkle tarragon over.

From Bon Appetit.

Creamy Stovetop Macaroni and Cheese

1 pound elbows, shells, cavatappi, farfalle, fusilli or other short, tube-shaped pasta
Kosher salt
2 cups whole milk
8 ounces cream cheese, cut into 1-inch pieces
12 ounces sharp or white Cheddar, grated
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
Freshly ground pepper

Cook pasta in a large pot of salted water until just barely al dente; drain.

Meanwhile, bring milk up to a simmer in a large pot. (The pot should be large enough to hold all the pasta when cooked.) Reduce heat to low, add cream cheese, and whisk until it’s completely blended and no lumps remain. Add Cheddar cheese and butter, whisking until everything is completely melted. Season with salt and a generous amount of pepper.

Add cooked pasta and stir to coat. Continue to cook over medium-low heat until the sauce has thickened and is coating each piece of pasta nicely, 2 to 3 minutes; sauce will continue to thicken as it cools. Season again with more salt and pepper before serving.

Hush Puppies

2 cups cornmeal
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1/2 cup grated onion
1/4 cup sliced green onion
1 large egg yolk
1 cup buttermilk
6 large egg whites
Canola oil, for frying

In a large bowl, whisk together cornmeal, flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt.

Stir in onions.

Combine egg yolk and buttermilk; stir into cornmeal mixture until combined.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat egg whites until stiff.

Gently fold into cornmeal mixture.

Fill a large deep skillet with 2 to 3 inches oil. Heat oil until it reaches 375* on a deep-fry thermometer.

Working in batches, drop batter 1 t at a time into the oil and cook, turning once until the hush puppies rise to the surface and are golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes.

Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate.

Serve immediately.

Moros y Cristos

2 TABLESPOONS EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL
½ MEDIUM YELLOW or WHITE ONION, chopped
2 GARLIC CLOVES, finely chopped
½ MEDIUM GREEN BELL PEPPER, seeded and chopped
1 JALAPEÑO CHILE, finely chopped
1 CUP LONG-GRAIN WHITE RICE
1 BAY LEAF 2 CUPS WATER
1 TEASPOON SALT
2 CUPS COOKED BLACK BEANS (see previous recipe), drained
FRESH CILANTRO LEAVES for garnishing

In a small Dutch oven with a lid over medium-high heat, warm the olive oil. Add the onion, garlic, bell pepper, and chile. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, fragrant, and beginning to brown, about 10 minutes.

Add the rice and stir to coat thoroughly with the oil. Add the bay leaf, water, salt, and beans.

Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook at a very slow simmer until the rice is tender and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 20 minutes. You may check the beans and rice toward the end of the cooking time to make sure the water level is not too low and add a bit more water if needed, but you should leave the beans and rice as undisturbed as possible.

Remove from the heat and let sit, covered, for 10 minutes before serving.

Garnish each serving with cilantro.

Basic Black Beans

1 POUND BLACK VALENTINE BEANS, soaked
2 TABLESPOONS SAFFLOWER or GRAPESEED OIL
1 SMALL WHITE ONION, chopped
2 GARLIC CLOVES, finely chopped
1/2 MEDIUM GREEN BELL PEPPER, seeded and chopped
1 JALAPEÑO CHILE, CHOPPED
2 TABLESPOONS CIDER VINEGAR
1/4 CUP FRESH CILANTRO LEAVES
1/4 TEASPOON SPANISH SMOKED PAPRIKA
SALT AND FRESHLY GROUND PEPPER

Put the beans and their soaking water in a stockpot and add more cold water if needed to cover the beans by at least 1 inch. Bring to a rapid boil and cook for 5 minutes.

Reduce the heat so that the beans are barely simmering and cook until the beans are nearly soft, about 1 hour.

Meanwhile, in a medium, heavy skillet over medium-high heat, warm the safflower oil. Add the onion, garlic, bell pepper, and chile and sauté until the vegetables are very aromatic and beginning to brown, 8 to 10 minutes.

Add the vinegar, cilantro, paprika, and salt and pepper to taste and continue to cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes.

(Skip this step if making Moros y Cristos.) Scoop 1 cup of the beans from the pot and add to the skillet. Using a potato masher, mash the beans with the sofrito.

Add sofrito to the pot of simmering beans and season to taste with salt and pepper. Simmer until the beans are tender and flavorful, 30 to 40 minutes.

Basic Pot Beans

1 TABLESPOON LARD or EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL
1/2 MEDIUM WHITE or RED ONION, chopped
2 GARLIC CLOVES, smashed
1 POUND BEANS OF YOUR CHOICE, soaked (page 21)
SALT
4 KEY LIMES, cut in half, for serving
FINELY CHOPPED WHITE or RED ONION, for serving
1/4 CUP CHOPPED FRESH CILANTRO for serving

In a stock pot, over medium heat, warm the lard.

Add the onion and garlic and sauté until soft and fragrant, about 10 minutes.

Add the beans and their soaking water. Add more cold water if needed to cover the beans by at least 1 inch.

Raise the heat to high, bring to a rapid boil, and cook for 5 minutes.

Reduce the heat so that the beans are barely simmering and cook, partially covered, until the beans are soft, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Season the beans judiciously with salt, keeping in mind that it takes time for the beans to absorb the salt.

Ladle the beans into warmed bowls.

Diners top their servings with a squeeze of key lime, a spoonful of chopped onions, and a sprinkling of cilantro.

Caribbean Red Beans and Rice

Serves 4 to 6, doubles like a dream

2 cups cooked Rancho Gordo Domingo Rojo beans or pigeon peas
2-1/2-cups brown rice, cooked and cooled
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 green or red pepper, chopped
1/4 habañero (Scotch bonnet pepper) or 1 to 2 jalapeños, seeded and chopped, depending on how hot you like it*
2 celery stalks, chopped
1 tomato, chopped (or 1 cup canned diced tomatoes, drained)
1 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1 small handful fresh thyme leaves, or ¼ teaspoon dried
1 small bunch cilantro, coarsely chopped
Sea salt and pepper to taste

In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat.

Add the onion and garlic, and sauté until softened, about 5 minutes.

Add the pepper, habañero, and celery, and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, for another 5 minutes.

Stir in the diced tomato and season with the allspice and cumin.

Add the cooked Domingo Rojo beans and rice, stirring until the mixture is well combined. Reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the moisture from the vegetables is absorbed, about 10 minutes.

Add the thyme, cilantro, sea salt, and pepper.

Chocolate Calypso Beans

1 lb. calypso or Jacob’s Cattle beans
2 T. olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
5 cloves garlic, minced
2T. ground, dried red chilies (I used med-hot Chimayo)
1 1/2 T ground cumin
2+ t. ground cinnamon
1 t. ground allspice
4 1/2 cups water or vegetable stock
1 12 oz. bottle Negro Modelo Mexican beer
1 1/2 discs Ibarra Mexican chocolate

Rinse the beans, pick out any pebbles or dirt. Rehydrate beans by soaking overnight, or start soaking them in the morning if you are cooking later in the evening. Drain and rinse.

In a large stock pot saute the onion, red pepper, and garlic in olive oil for 5 minutes. Add the spices and saute for another minute or so.

To the sauteed ingredients/spices add drained beans, water or stock, and beer. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until beans are tender, roughly two hours, stirring gently every 15 minutes or so.

When beans are done stir in the chocolate and generously add salt to taste.

Sweet Potatoes with Bourbon and Brown Sugar

3 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, pricked with a fork (10 to 12 sweet potatoes)
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 to 4 tablespoons dark brown sugar, or to taste
1 1/2 tablespoons bourbon or orange juice
3/4 teaspoon grated lemon zest
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
Large pinch of ground cloves

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Wrap potatoes in foil, place on a rimmed baking sheet, and bake until tender, about 1 hour. Let rest until cool enough to handle but still warm, then remove the foil and peel off the skins.

Add sweet potatoes to a food processor, along with butter, brown sugar, bourbon or juice, lemon zest, salt, nutmeg, pepper and cloves. Purée until smooth. (Or, for a chunkier texture, mash them by hand.) Taste and add salt, sugar or both if you like. Serve while still warm or reheat before serving.

Tip
This recipe can be made up to 3 days in advance and stored in the refrigerator. Reheat just before serving, either in the microwave or in a pot on the stove over low heat.

Grilled Flank Steak with Soy-Chile Glaze

1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/3 cup lightly packed dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
2 1/4 pounds flank steak
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Thinly sliced scallions and lime wedges

Light a grill or preheat a grill pan. In a small saucepan, heat the oil. Add the garlic and ginger and cook over moderately high heat, stirring occasionally, until the garlic begins to turn golden. Add the soy sauce, sugar and crushed red pepper and cook, stirring, until syrupy, about 3 minutes; let cool.

Season the steak with salt and pepper. Grill the steak for 10 minutes for medium-rare meat, turning once; during the last minute, brush all but 2 tablespoons of the glaze over the steak. Transfer the steak to a cutting board and let stand for 5 minutes.

Grilled Balsamic and Garlic Marinated Flank Steak

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large garlic clove
1/2 teaspoon thyme leaves
One 2 1/2-pound flank steak
Salt and freshly ground pepper

In a blender, combine the vinegar, oil, garlic and thyme and puree until smooth. In a large glass or ceramic dish, pour the marinade over the steak. Let stand for 5 minutes.

Heat a grill pan. Season the steak with salt and pepper. Grill over moderately high heat, turning once, until medium, about 8 minutes per side. Transfer the steak to a board and let stand for 10 minutes. Slice the steak, transfer to plates and serve.

Cuban Flank Steak

1 teaspoon grated lime zest plus 2 tablespoons lime juice
1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest plus 1/4 cup orange juice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for grilling
2 large garlic cloves
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh oregano
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
Kosher salt
Pepper
One 1 1/2-pound flank steak
2 ripe, firm mangoes—peeled, pitted and sliced
Lime wedges, for serving

In a blender, combine the ?citrus zests and juice with the 2 tablespoons of olive oil, the garlic, oregano, cumin, 1 1/4 teaspoons salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper and blend until smooth.

In a glass or ceramic baking dish, pour all but 1/4 cup of the marinade over the steak and turn to coat. Let stand for 15 minutes, or cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 24 hours.

Light a grill or grill pan and oil the grate. Remove the steak from the marinade, letting the excess drip off. Season with salt and pepper and grill over moderate heat, turning once, until lightly charred and an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 125, 10 to 12 minutes.

Transfer the steak to a carving board and let rest for 5 minutes. Thinly slice the meat against the grain and transfer to a platter with the mango slices and lime wedges. Drizzle with the reserved marinade and serve.

Thai Grilled Chicken (Gai Yang)

3 1/2 pounds chicken leg-and-thigh quarters

Marinade
1/3 cup coarsely chopped cilantro stems
1/4 cup coarsely chopped garlic
1/4 teaspoon plus 1/8 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
2 teaspoons light palm sugar or light brown sugar
5 tablespoons fish sauce

1/2 to 3/4 cup Thai Sweet Chile Sauce

Trim excess fat and skin from the chicken. Put into a baking dish or bowl. Set aside.

Use a mini food processor to grind the cilantro stems, garlic, salt, pepper, and sugar to a coarse texture. Add the fish sauce and pulse to emulsify. Taste and season with salt, pepper, or sugar to create a marinade with a slightly intense savory-sweet bite.

Pour the marinade over the chicken. Use your hands to massage it into the chicken, making sure you get some between the skin and flesh too. Cover and set aside for 1 hour. Or, refrigerate for several hours, letting the chicken sit out for 45 minutes before grilling.

Preheat a gas grill to medium or prepare a charcoal fire to medium heat. Grill the chicken for 25 to 35 minutes, turning occasionally, until cooked through. Transfer to a platter. Brush on the sweet chile sauce or serve it on the side for guests to help themselves.

Thai Barbecue Chicken

1 tbsp finely chopped cilantro roots (or substitute with bottom stems)
8 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 shallots, finely chopped
2 tsp white peppercorns, freshly ground
1 tbsp coriander seeds, freshly ground
2 tsp yellow curry powder
2-3 tbsp fish sauce (nahm bplah), to taste
1-2 tsp sugar, to taste
1 large roasting chicken, cut into smaller sections (or see note below), or half a dozen leg-thigh pieces

Coconut milk for basting chicken while grilling (about 1/2 cup)
Using a heavy mortar and pestle, pound cilantro roots, garlic and shallots to a paste. Add the freshly ground white pepper, coriander and curry powder. Stir and pound to blend the dry and wet ingredients. Add the fish sauce and sugar. Stir well to dissolve the sugar.

Trim off excess fat around the edges of chicken pieces, leaving the skin on. Rub paste onto the surface of the chicken and under the skin. Marinate two hours or up to overnight.

Grill over medium-hot charcoals (preferably mesquite or other wood coals). Turn frequently to prevent charring and burning. Add about 1/2 cup coconut milk to the bowl with the remaining marinate. Stir to mix and use this coconut milk mixture to baste pieces after each turning. Grill until cooked through. Serve with Sweet and Tangy Dipping Sauce (see below).

Serves 6-8 with other dishes and rice in a shared family-style meal.

Thai Satay (Chicken, Beef, or Pork)

1 1/2 lb. boneless chicken breast, beef, or pork
1 tsp. whole coriander seeds
1 tsp. whole cumin seeds
1 tsp. ground turmeric
3-4 shallots, peeled and sliced thin crosswise
1 stalk fresh lemon grass, sliced thin crosswise
1/4 inch piece of fresh galangal
1 clove garlic, peeled and smashed
1/2 tsp. sea salt
2 tsp. sugar
20 bamboo skewers
2 Tbsp. cooking oil, canola or peanut

Slice meat into long thin slices, approximately 1/4″ thick and 2″ in length. Pat dry with paper towels.

Dry roast coriander seeds for a minute or two in a wok over medium heat to roast lightly, stirring often.

Grind the coriander seeds in a mortar and pestle or electric coffee grinder (reserved for spices).

Combine all the spices with the shallot, lemon grass, galangal and garlic together in a bowl.

Add meat to the marinade and mix well to cover meat. Allow to marinate for at least an hour or up to overnight.

Before cooking, soak bamboo skewers in water for at least 10 minutes, so that they will not burn.

Skewer 2 to 3 pieces of meat onto each stick. Grill over a hot fire until cooked through. Baste with cooking oil after turning.

Serve with rice and a cucumber salad.

Thai Pork Satay (Moo Satay)

PORK AND MARINADE

2 Pounds Pork tenderloin, sliced into 1/4
4 Tablespoons Lemongrass water
5 Tablespoons Thin soy sauce
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1 Tablespoon Sugar
14 Ounces Coconut milk
1 Teaspoon Turmeric powder
1/2 Tablespoon Thai curry powder
1 Teaspoon Baking Soda

BASTING LIQUID

1 Remaining from above Coconut milk
1 Tablespoon Sugar
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1 Teaspoon Turmeric powder

SATAY SAUCE

5 Whole Dried Chile, soaked in water to soften
1 1/2 Tablespoons Chopped fresh galangal
1 1/2 Tablespoons Thinly sliced lemongrass
5 Leaves Fresh kaffir lime leaves, finely sliced
2 Tablespoons Fresh shallot, thinly sliced
3 Cloves Garlic
1/4 Tablespoon Shrimp paste
1 Tablespoon Matsaman curry paste
1/4 Cup White sesame seed, toasted in a dry wok or skillet
1/4 Cup Dried roasted peanut
2 Cups Coconut cream
1/4 Cup Palm sugar
2 Tablespoons Fish sauce
1 Tablespoon Tamarind concentrate mixed with 1 tablespoon water

AJAD

1/2 Cup White vinegar
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1/3 Cup Sugar
1/2 Cup Thinly sliced cucumber
1/4 Cup Sliced shallot
3 Each Fresh Thai chile peppers, sliced

METHOD FOR PORK MARINADE

Thinly slice 1 stalk of fresh lemongrass, put in a bowl, then pour 1/2 cup boiling water over it. Remove 4 tablespoons of the water and set to cool.

For the can of coconut milk, don’t stir it up, and some will have a thicker consistency. Measure 1/3 cup of the thicker part for the marinade. You will use the thinner part for your basting liquid below.

In a mixing bowl, combine the lemongrass water with the coconut cream, and the other ingredients. Mix well, then add the pork, and refrigerate for 1 hour or more.

METHOD FOR BASTING LIQUID

Combine the four ingredients, mix well, and set aside.

METHOD FOR SATAY SAUCE

Start by pounding your white sesame seeds in a mortar & pestle, into a thick paste. Set aside. Then pound the peanuts until fine, and set aside.

Next, put the whole dried chile, fresh galangal, lime leaves, and lemongrass into the mortar & pestle. Pound together well, then add shallot, garlic, and shrimp paste. Leave it in the mortar. Heat a wok or large pan to medium heat, and add this mixture from the mortar. Saute it with 1 cup coconut cream. Stir constantly, until all dissolved. Add matsaman curry paste, fish sauce, tamarind, palm sugar, and stir well. Add remaining coconut cream.

Add the sesame seed paste and pounded peanuts (or leave the peanuts out if you prefer) to this mixture and cook over medium/low heat for 10 minutes or so. It should all blend together well.

METHOD FOR AJAD

In a small saucepan, mix vinegar, salt and sugar over medium heat. Stir until dissolves, then remove from heat and set to cool. Just before serving, add the cucumber, shallot and sliced chiles to this.

PREPARING AND SERVING YOUR PORK SATAY

Cook the marinated pork skewers over charcoal, constantly basting them with the basting liquid. Serve together with the satay sauce, ajad, and for an authentic twist–with sliced toast as shown.
Enjoy!

Thai Chicken Satay 2 Ways (Satay Gai)

Version 1 you can make in your kitchen without a charcoal grill. The chicken in both versions is prepared as you’d find in Thailand — using thin strips, instead of thick cuts that restaurants outside of Thailand often serve for satay.

You can of course also make the same recipe as beef satay, pork satay, or prawn satay (large prawns usually deheaded and the skewer threaded lengthwise down the body).

MARINADE INGREDIENTS VERSION 1

1 Pound Chicken Breast, cut into thin pieces 2 – 3 inches long
1 Cup Coconut Milk
1 Teaspoon Turmeric Powder
1 Tablespoon Sugar
1 1/2 Tablespoons Thin Soy Sauce

NAM JIM SATAY PEANUT SAUCE INGREDIENTS VERSION 1

1 Tablespoon Red Curry Paste
1/4 Cup Fried Red Onion
1/2 Teaspoon Extra-Fine Ground Chile powder
1/4 Cup Roasted Peanut
1 1/2 Cups Coconut Milk
2 1/2 Tablespoons Palm Sugar
1 Tablespoon Tamarind Concentrate mixed w/1 TBSP Water

MARINADE INGREDIENTS VERSION 2

1 Teaspoon Coriander Seed
1 Teaspoon Cumin Seed
1 Tablespoon Chopped Garlic
1 Tablespoon Fresh Grated Ginger
1 Pound Chicken Breasts, Skinned, boned, and cut into bite sized pieces.
2 Tablespoons Fish Sauce
1 Tablespoon Curry Powder
Pinch Turmeric Powder (as only a colorant, so very little!)
8 Tablespoons Coconut Milk
3 Tablespoons Palm Sugar

NAM JIM SATAY PEANUT SAUCE INGREDIENTS VERSION 2

4 Ounces Roasted (unsalted) Peanuts
4 Cloves Garlic, Chopped
1 Ounce Chopped Onion
1 1/2 Tablespoon Red or Massaman Curry paste
1 Teaspoon Fish Sauce
8 Tablespoons Coconut Milk
6 Teaspoons Lime Juice (to taste)
2 1/2 Teaspoons Palm Sugar

INGREDIENTS FOR A JAD CUCUMBER SAUCE

8 Tablespoons White Vinegar
2 Teaspoons Sugar
2 1/2 Tablespoons Cucumber, Very Coarsely chopped or sliced
2 Shallots (or any variety of purple onion) Chopped
8 Fresh Thai Chiles

MARINADE METHOD – VERSION 1

Mix coconut milk, turmeric powder, sugar and soy sauce in a bowl, add chicken, marinade for 1 hour. You can thread the chicken onto satay sticks now, or cook the chicken first and thread it onto the sticks later (as we did). Cook the chicken over low heat, using all the marinade to baste as it cooks.

PEANUT SAUCE METHOD – VERSION 1

Pound the fried red onion in a mortar and pestle, set aside. Pound peanuts in a mortar and pestle, and set aside.

In a saucepan, heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and fry red curry paste together with the pounded red onion and chile powder over medium heat, until fragrant. Add peanut, palm sugar, tamarind, salt, and stir. Add coconut milk, reduce heat, and keep at a high simmer until oil rises (this oil comes from the coconut milk, and it will look distinctive as shown in photo).

Serve as shown, with chicken on skewers accompanied by a bowl of satay sauce, and a bowl of ajad (see below).

MARINADE METHOD – VERSION 2

Beat the chicken flat, using the flat of the blade of a heavy cleaver or a meat tenderizing mallet. You can also use a rolling pin.

The coriander and cumin are toasted then crushed in a mortar and pestle. The ingredients are then combined to form a marinade, and the chicken is marinated overnight. The pieces of chicken are then threaded on the satay sticks, loosely folding them in half and piercing through the folded meat to form a loose gather.

The completed sticks are then grilled, broiled or barbequed on fairly high heat (they taste best done over charcoal, as they absorb the smoke). Turn them regularly and brush them liberally with the remaining marinade. Cooking should take between 5 and 10 minutes depending on the heat of your cooker.

PEANUT SAUCE METHOD – VERSION 2

First grind or crush the peanuts to a fairly fine powder. Then combine them with the remaining ingredients (except the lime juice), to form a smooth sauce. If the sauce is too thick, you can thin it with a littlechicken stock. Now add the lime juice, tasting as you progress to check the balance of flavors is correct.

Note use red curry paste with beef or pork satay, massaman (as above) with chicken. If you are doing shrimp satay then use half the quantity of massaman paste.

A JAD SAUCE

Combine the ingredients, and leave to stand overnight. Alternatively, you can gently heat the vinegar, add 4 tablespoons water, let it cool, then pour that over the other ingredients and serve right away.

Each diner should have a small bowl of nam jim and a small bowl of a jad. However the satay themselves are normally served “communally”. We like to eat steamed jasmine rice that has a few spoonfulls of the Peanut Sauce on top.

Crispy Pork and Garlic (Moo Tod Gratiem)

1 Pound Lean Pork Meat, Sliced Into 1/4
1 Teaspoon Corriander Powder
1/2 Head of Garlic, Pounded in A mortar & pestle
1/2 Head of Garlic, Roughly Chopped
1 Teaspoon Thai Pepper Powder
2 Teaspoons Corn Starch
2 Teaspoons Fish Sauce
1 Tablespoon Thin Soy Sauce
1 Teaspoon Sugar
1 Teaspoon Sesame Oil

Pound your pork slices with a meat mallet to soften it, then transfer to a mixing bowl.

In a mortar & pestle, pound 1/2 head of garlic. Add corriander powder, Thai pepper powder, and pound into a paste. Add this paste to the pork in a mixing bowl.

Add corn starch, fish sauce, thin soy sauce, sugar and sesame oil. Mix well and let this marinade in the fridge for 1/2 hour or longer.

Heat wok, and add just enough oil to fry your pork. Over medium/low heat (not too high), cook your pork in the oil and be careful not to over cook it. Fry both sides until golden brown. Remove from wok.

Remove any bits of blackened garlic from the oil. Next, add 1/2 head of sliced garlic. Quickly remove it from the oil as soon as it gets brown. Set the garlic on a paper towel to dry for a few minutes.

Put fried garlic on top of the pork, serve with cilantro as a garnish (optional), and your favorite rice. Enjoy!

Note: In Thailand, this is a recipe that’s usually made at home, not typically found in a restaurant. Mothers will make this for kids to eat on a long trip or picnic. The pork smells delicious, with the garlic. Kept in a food carrier, this is a special treat. Usually served with sticky rice, or jasmine rice.