Pressure Cooker Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup

3 pounds beef shank, cut into 2-inch chunks
2 tablespoons oil
A 2-inch piece of ginger, smashed
6 cloves garlic, smashed
3 scallions, cut into 2-inch segments
1 onion, cut into wedges
1 tomato, cut into wedges
4 dried chilies, ripped in half
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 tablespoons spicy bean paste (douban jiang)
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup Shaoxing wine
Chinese aromatic herbs packet (lu bao) — do yourself a favor and hunt down the pre-packaged version; if you can’t access it though, see below for ingredients to create your own spice sachet).
Fresh white noodles
A small handful of bok choy for each serving
Cilantro, finely chopped
Scallions, finely chopped
Pickled mustard greens to taste

To create your own spice sachet, tie up the following ingredients in cheesecloth:
4 star anise
1 small cinnamon stick
3 bay leaves
1 tablespoon fennel seeds
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
2 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns
1/4 teaspoon five spice powder
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Boil enough water in a pot to boil all of your beef. Once the water is boiling, add the beef. Let it come back up to a boil, and boil for 1 minute. Strain in a colander and rinse thoroughly with fresh water to remove any impurities.

Next, in your instant pot, turn on the saute setting. Add the oil, crushed ginger, garlic, scallions, and onions in that order. Stir to lightly caramelize. Let the onion turn translucent. Add the tomato and dried chilies.

Next, add the meat to the pot. Then add the tomato paste, spicy bean paste, sugar, soy sauce, and Shaoxing wine, and mix thoroughly.

Pour 8 cups of water into the instant pot. Add the spice packet. The instant pot should be filled to the 10-cup line; it shouldn’t be more than ? of the way full per safety instructions. Our instant pot is the largest size (8 quarts); if yours is smaller, you can halve the recipe accordingly.
Close the lid of the instant pot, and make sure you have your vent set so it is not venting. Cook for 100 minutes on the aromatic meat stew setting. If you don’t have an instant pot, you can use a regular pot on the stove, but instead, cook the soup on a low simmer for 3-4 hours.
When the instant pot timer is up, carefully release the pressure valve (wear an oven mitt, so you don’t scald yourself!). Boil some noodles per package instructions, and in the last minute or two of the noodles cooking, throw your bok choy in and blanch until just tender.

Serve each bowl of Taiwanese beef noodle soup with a serving of noodles, a few stalks of bok choy, and generous sprinklings of finely minced cilantro, scallions, and Chinese pickled mustard greens. Pro tip, buy the pre-seasoned spicy mustard greens and you can use them straight out of the package. If you are using the non-spicy version (from a can, for example), chop and saute with a little oil, a few chopped dried red chilies, and a pinch of sugar.

Lao Gan Ma Noodles

2 teaspoons light soy sauce
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon Chinese black vinegar
2 tablespoons minced scallions
1 teaspoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons of your favorite “godmother” sauce (lao gan ma), or to taste
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
3 tablespoons finely chopped za-cai (pickled radish)
2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds (optional)
3 tablespoons oil
1/3 cup raw peanuts
200 grams dried rice noodles (this makes a big single serving or two small servings)
A large handful of your leafy greens of choice
A small handful chopped cilantro

First prepare the sauce base in a large bowl by mixing together the light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, Chinese black vinegar, scallion, ginger, garlic, “godmother” sauce, sesame oil, za-cai, and sesame seeds.

Heat the oil in a wok using medium heat, and wok fry the peanuts for 5 to 7 minutes until cooked through. Take out the peanuts and drizzle the hot oil left in the wok into the sauce base.

Boil the rice noodles per package instructions. Once the rice noodles are a minute away from done, add in the leafy greens to blanch. Cook for the remaining minute, and then drain the noodles and the greens. Pour the sauce base over the noodles, stir to combine, and top with chopped cilantro.

Sha Cha Chicken Stir Fry

1 pound boneless skinless chicken breast, thinly sliced (can also substitute boneless skinless chicken thighs)
1 teaspoon soy sauce, plus 1 tablespoon
2 teaspoons cornstarch
Vegetable oil
1-2 tablespoons minced ginger
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons Sha Cha Sauce
2 teaspoon sugar
5 scallions, cut on an angle into 2-inch lengths

In a medium bowl, add the sliced chicken breast, 1 teaspoon soy sauce, 2 teaspoons cornstarch and 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Mix well.

Heat your wok over high heat until smoking. Add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, and sear the chicken until it just turns opaque (it can still be slightly pink). Remove the chicken from the wok and set aside.

Reduce the heat to medium, and add another couple tablespoons of oil to the wok. Add the ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add the garlic, sha cha sauce, and sugar, and fry this mixture for 2 minutes.

Then add the chicken back to the wok along with the scallions and the remaining tablespoon of soy sauce. Increase the heat to high, and stir-fry for 1 minute, until the scallions are wilted. Serve immediately with steamed rice!

Sha Cha Beef Stir Fry

1 pound beef, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon soy sauce, plus 1 tablespoon
2 teaspoons cornstarch
Vegetable oil
1-2 tablespoons minced ginger
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons Sacha Sauce
2 teaspoon sugar
5 scallions, cut on an angle into 2-inch lengths

To the beef, add 1 teaspoon soy sauce, 2 teaspoons cornstarch and 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Mix well. Heat your wok over high heat until smoking. Add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, and sear the beef until it just turns opaque (it can still be slightly pink). Remove the beef from the wok and set aside.

Reduce the heat to medium, and add another couple tablespoons of oil to the wok. Add the ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add the garlic, sacha sauce, and sugar, and fry this mixture for 2 minutes.

Add the scallions and beef back to the wok, along with the remaining tablespoon of soy sauce. Increase the heat to high, and stir-fry for 1 minute, until the scallions are wilted.

Pressure Cooker Soy Sauce Chicken

2 teaspoons oil
7 slices ginger
2 scallions, cut into 3-inch pieces
3 whole star anise
(3/4) 1 1/2 cups rose-flavored rice wine (mei kwei lu) or shaoxing wine
(3/4) 1 1/2 cups light soy sauce
(2/3) 1 1/4 cups dark soy sauce
(1/2) 1 cup sugar, plus 2 tablespoons
(1) 2 teaspoons salt
(5) 8 cups water
8 boneless skinless chicken thighs

Grab your instant pot. Turn on the sauté setting, and add the oil and ginger. Let it caramelize for about 30 seconds. Then add the scallions and cook another 30 seconds. Add the star anise, rice wine, soy sauce, dark soy sauce, sugar, salt, and water.

Close the lid of the instant pot, and make sure you have your vent set so it is not venting. Cook for 5 minutes on the high pressure cooking setting.

Safely release pressure, open the lid, and carefully lower the chicken thighs into the instant pot.

Cook the chicken for 15 minutes on the high pressure setting. Carefully release the vent when the timer is up. As soon as all the steam has escaped, you can open the instant pot.

Use two forks to shred the chicken into big chunks and serve over rice with sauce spooned over the top. Let the braising liquid cool, and store it in containers in the freezer. When you need it again, let it thaw in the refrigerator and throw it back in the instant pot with more chicken.

Here’s a quick set of guidelines:

If making the full recipe, you can freeze the reserved liquid and use it again 3 to 4 times.
If you halve the recipe, you’ll have less liquid, which is good for 1 to 2 additional uses.
When reusing the liquid, just add more water, more ginger and scallion, and an additional teaspoon of salt, if desired.
If you’d rather use chicken on the bone, you could also make this recipe with bone-in chicken thighs, chicken legs, wings, and/or chicken leg quarters.

Chicken Stir Fry with Nam Prik Pao

1 1/2 pounds chicken breast, sliced into ¼-inch thick pieces
1 tablespoon cornstarch
3 tablespoons oil, divided
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 Thai bird chilies, thinly sliced (optional)
1 red bell pepper, de-seeded and thinly sliced
5 scallions, sliced at an angle into 2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons Thai Chili Sauce (Namprik Pao)
1 tablespoon fish sauce

Add the chicken to a bowl, along with the 1 tablespoon cornstarch and 1 tablespoon oil. Mix well and set aside.

Heat a wok over high heat until smoking. Add 2 tablespoons of oil, and the chicken. Stir-fry the chicken for 1-2 minutes, until well-seared.

Add the garlic, chilies (if using), bell pepper, scallions, chili sauce, and fish sauce. Stir-fry for another 2 minutes.

Serve with steamed jasmine rice.

Red Curry Noodles with Chicken

8 oz. boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into thin strips
1 teaspoon cornstarch
Vegetable oil
3 tablespoons Thai red curry paste
1/2 cup coconut milk
1 pound fresh cooked egg noodles
1/2 of a red bell pepper, thinly sliced
2 cups bean sprouts
5 scallions, cut into 2-inch lengths
Lime wedges
2 tablespoons chopped peanuts (optional)

Combine the raw chicken with 1 teaspoon of cornstarch and 1 teaspoon vegetable oil. Set aside while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

When you’re ready to cook, heat a wok over medium high heat, and add a tablespoon of vegetable oil, along with the chicken. Stir-fry the chicken until opaque, remove from the pan, and set aside.

Add the red curry paste. Fry for one minute, and add the coconut milk. Add the noodles and stir-fry, loosening up the noodles as you go.

Add the red bell pepper and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the cooked chicken, bean sprouts and scallions and cook for another 2 minutes, until the scallions are wilted.

Serve with lime wedges, and garnish with chopped peanuts if using.

Bang Bang Chicken

1 large chicken breast (or 2 smaller ones), about ½ lb
3 slices ginger
1 scallion, plus 2 tablespoons finely chopped scallions
1/2 seedless cucumber, julienned
1/2 cup chicken stock (i.e., the cooking water from the chicken)
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
4 teaspoons Chinese dark vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon chili oil (or to taste)
2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
1 teaspoon ground Sichuan peppercorn
1/2 teaspoon salt

First, poach the chicken. In a small pot, add 2 cups water, 3 slices ginger and 1 scallion. Bring it to a boil, then add in the chicken breast. Once the water boils again, put the lid on and turn the heat to the lowest setting. Cook for 10-12 minutes. The chicken breast is done if the juice comes out clear when you poke the middle with a chopstick. Transfer the chicken breast to an ice bath to stop the cooking process and keep the chicken moist. Don’t discard the cooking water, as we’ll be using it later in the recipe.

Second, assemble the plate. Julienne the cucumber and spread it in an even layer on a shallow plate. Now, hammer the chicken with a rolling pin to flatten the meat and break it up into shreds. Layer the chicken on top of the cucumber.

Third, prepare the sauce. Mix together the following: 1/2 cup chicken stock (i.e., the cooking water from the chicken), 2 tablespoons light soy sauce, 4 teaspoons Chinese dark vinegar, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 1/2 tablespoons sesame oil, 1 tablespoon chili oil (or to taste), 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds, 1 teaspoon ground Sichuan peppercorn, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 2 tablespoons finely chopped scallions.

Finally, pour the sauce over the chicken and cucumber, and serve. Toss the chicken and cucumber to coat with the sauce just before you’re ready to dig in!

Vietnamese Rice Noodle Salad with Chicken

For the chicken & marinade:
4 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 lime, juiced
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tbsp vegetable oil

For the nuoc cham sauce:
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 lime, juiced
2 tablespoons rice vinegar or white vinegar
1/4 cup fish sauce
3 tablespoons sugar
1 red chili, de-seeded and sliced (or substitute 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce or Sriracha)
1/2 cup cold water

To assemble the bowls:
200g dried rice vermicelli noodles
Vegetable oil
2 cups bean sprouts
1 large carrot, julienned
1 seedless cucumber, julienned
6 leaves romaine lettuce, finely julienned
Mint
Cilantro

In a medium bowl, combine the chicken thighs with your marinade ingredients, and set aside for 30 mins to an hour while you prepare the other salad ingredients.

Combine all the nuoc cham ingredients and stir until the sugar has completely dissolved into the sauce. Taste and adjust any of the ingredients if desired.

Boil the rice vermicelli noodles according to the package instructions. Drain and rinse under cold running water. Set aside in a colander.

Heat 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil in a cast iron skillet or frying pan over medium high heat. You could also heat a grill pan or grill for this. Sear the chicken for about 4 minutes per side, or until cooked through. Set aside on a plate.

To assemble the salad, combine the rice noodles with bean sprouts, julienned carrots and cucumber, romaine lettuce, mint, and cilantro. Slice the chicken thighs and add to the salad. Serve with your nuoc cham sauce.

Stir-fried Cabbage (with Pork or Chicken)

2 tablespoons oil
6 oz. pork belly, pork loin, or chicken, thinly sliced
5 cloves garlic, smashed and cut in half
5 dried red chilies, deseeded and roughly chopped
1 1/2 lb. cabbage, hand-shredded into bite sized pieces, washed, and thoroughly dried
2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon water
1/2 teaspoon Chinese black vinegar
2 scallions, cut into 2-inch lengths

In a wok over high heat, add the oil. Sear the meat until caramelized. Add the garlic and chili, turn down the heat to medium, and stir-fry for a minute, taking care not to burn the garlic.

Add the cabbage, wine, soy sauce, sugar, and water. Turn up the heat to high, cover the lid and let the cabbage cook for 1-2 minutes. Uncover the lid, and stir in the dark vinegar, scallions, and salt to taste. The cabbage should be wilted, but still slightly crunchy and caramelized. Serve hot!

Stir-fried Cabbage with Glass Noodles

2 small bundles of dried glass noodles
1 1/2 pounds cabbage, thinly julienned
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon dark vinegar
1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/4 cup water
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
5 slices ginger, julienned
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3-4 dried red chilies, roughly chopped (optional)
Salt, to taste
2 scallions, chopped

Soak 2 small bundles of dried glass noodles in cold water for 5 minutes until slightly softened. Drain and cut the glass noodles in half lengthwise. Set aside.

Prepare the stir fry sauce by mixing together 1 tablespoon light soy sauce, 1/2 teaspoon dark soy sauce, 1/2 teaspoon dark vinegar, 1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, 1/4 teaspoon sugar, and 1/2 cup water.

Heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a wok over medium heat. Cook the ginger and garlic until the garlic has browned lightly.

Add the cabbage, and turn the heat to the highest setting. Stir fry for 1-2 minutes until the cabbage is slightly wilted. Add the dried chilies (if using).

Add the prepared sauce and the glass noodles. Stir and mix everything well, turning down the heat a bit if the dish is becoming too dry and risks getting burned. Salt to taste and add the scallions. Stir to combine once more, and serve!

Sheet Pan Thai Chicken Salad with Red Curry Butternut Squash

For the roasted butternut squash and chicken:
1 medium butternut squash, cut into 1/4-inch chunks (feel free to substitute sweet potato or any other kind of winter squash like kabocha, acorn, etc.)
2 bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts
About half of a 4-ounce can of Thai red curry paste
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons melted butter
About 1 1/2 teaspoons black pepper to sprinkle over the squash and the chicken

For the salad:
1 handful torn mint
1 handful torn cilantro
Baby kale and baby mesclun greens
1 small red onion, sliced very thinly
Juice of 1 lime
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon honey or agave syrup
1 garlic clove, minced
1/3 cup neutral oil, such as vegetable, canola, or light olive oil
Salt, to taste

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Spread the butternut squash on the pan, leaving space for 2 chicken breasts in the center.
Mix 2 ounces of Thai red curry paste with 2 tablespoons olive oil and 2 tablespoons of melted butter. Spoon a little less than half over the chicken breasts and spread evenly all over the chicken. Pour the rest over the butternut squash and toss to coat.
Roast the butternut squash for 30 min. Turn the heat down to 350 degrees F. Place the marinated chicken breasts on the pan with the squash and continue to roast for 35 min (the internal temperature should read 165F).
When the cooking time is almost complete, assemble the salad. Toss some torn mint, cilantro, and your preferred salad mix into a bowl with 1 small thinly sliced red onion.
In a separate bowl, whisk together the juice of 1 lime, 1 tablespoon rice vinegar, 1 teaspoon fish sauce, 1 tablespoon honey, 1 minced garlic clove, and ? cup mild-flavored oil until it’s emulsified into a salad dressing. Season with salt to taste.
Shred the chicken, and toss it with butternut squash, greens, and dressing for a warm Thai chicken salad.
You can also simply enjoy the butternut squash and chicken with some hearty sauteed fall greens like kale or collards on the side!

Dry-Fried Beef Chow Ho Fun (Gon Chow Ngau Ho)

For the beef & marinade:
8 oz. flank steak (sliced into ? thick pieces)
1/4 teaspoon baking soda (optional)
1 teaspoon corn starch
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon vegetable oil

For the rest of the dish:
12 oz. fresh ho fun flat rice noodles
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 scallions, split in half vertically and cut into 3-inch pieces
3 thin slices ginger
2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons regular soy sauce
Pinch of sugar
salt and white pepper, to taste
4 to 6 ounces fresh mung bean sprouts

Combine the beef and marinade ingredients and let it marinate for about an hour. The little bit of baking soda tenderizes the meat.The longer you marinate the beef, the more tender it gets. This is totally optional.

A useful tip for slicing the beef is to freeze it until it gets firm but not solid which makes slicing the beef much easier!
Some rice noodles come as large sheets, while others are already cut. If you have the sheets, slice the rice noodles so they’re about 1 inch thick.

Heat your wok over high heat until smoking, and add 1½ tablespoons oil to coat the wok. Add the beef and sear until browned. As long as your wok is hot enough, the meat shouldn’t stick. Set aside. Add a 1½ tablespoons more vegetable oil to the wok. Then add the ginger first to infuse the oil with its rich flavor for about 15 seconds. Add the scallions.

Spread the noodles evenly in the wok and stir-fry the whole mix on high until it is mixed evenly, about 15 seconds. Add the Shaoxing wine around the rim of the wok.

Next, add the sesame oil, soy sauces, pinch of sugar and the beef. Stir fry, making sure your metal wok spatula scrapes the bottom of the wok and you lift the ho fun in an upward motion to mix well and coat them evenly with the soy sauce.

Add a bit of salt and white pepper to taste (taste the noodles before adding salt).

If the noodles were cold and refrigerated when you started, you may have to toss the noodles longer to heat them through properly. If the noodles are fresh, then less time will be required. Your heat should remain as high as possible at all times. Add the bean sprouts and stir-fry until the bean sprouts are just tender. Serve!

Saucy Beef Chow Ho Fun (Sup Chow Ngau Ho)

For the beef:
12 ounces sliced flank steak
1/4 teaspoon baking soda (optional)
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon water
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch

For the rest of the dish:
1 pound fresh rice noodles
2 cups warm low sodium beef or chicken stock
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
Fresh ground white pepper to taste
3 tablespoons canola oil, divided
3 thin slices ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup (1½ ounces) fresh Chinese black mushrooms or Shiitake mushrooms
2 scallions, cut at an angle into 2-inch pieces (with the white and green parts separated)
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
2 cups (6 ounces) napa cabbage, cut crosswise into ½-inch wide long pieces
2 cups (5 ounces) fresh mung bean sprouts
Cornstarch slurry (2 tablespoons cornstarch mixed with 2 tablespoons water)

Cut the rice noodles into 1-1/2-inch wide pieces and set aside. They should be at room temperature.

In a wide shallow bowl, mix the beef, 1/4 teaspoon baking soda, 1 teaspoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon water, 1 teaspoon vegetable oil, and 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch until the beef is well coated. The beef should absorb the water and soy sauce so there’s no liquid. Set aside for 30 minutes at room temperature.

In a bowl, combine the warmed stock or water, 1 tablespoon light soy sauce, 2 teaspoons dark soy sauce, 2 tablespoons oyster sauce, 1/2 teaspoon sugar, 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil, and fresh ground white pepper to taste, and set aside.
Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in your wok until it’s close to smoking. Add the beef to give it a quick sear for 30 seconds on each side. The beef should be cooked to about 80 percent doneness. Return the beef to the bowl, and set aside.

Turn the heat to medium, and add 1 tablespoon oil to the wok, along with the ginger. Let it caramelize for about 20 seconds. Next, stir in the garlic and immediately add the Chinese black mushrooms and the white portions of the scallions.

Turn the heat to high, and stir-fry for 15 seconds. Add 1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine and the napa cabbage.

Stir-fry for another 15 seconds, and add the sauce mixture you prepared earlier. Once the sauce starts to simmer and boil, add the fresh ho fun rice noodles, folding them into the sauce so the noodles don’t break apart. Reduce the heat to a simmer if needed, and after 30 seconds (or when the rice noodles are heated through), add the mung bean sprouts and the beef.

Fold in the beef and mung bean sprouts until everything is coated and heated through. Add the green portions of the scallions.

Drizzle in half of the cornstarch slurry while stirring, and cook for 20 seconds. Check the thickness of the sauce. Add more slurry until the sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon.

The sauce consistency and quantity is all per your personal preference. You can adjust the recipe by increasing the amount of stock, seasonings, and/or cornstarch slurry.

The sauce should be allowed to cook for at least 20 seconds after adding the last of the cornstarch slurry to ensure the starch gets cooked. Serve your Beef Chow Ho Fun Noodles with your favorite chili oil!

Pan-fried Chicken and Noodles (Gai See Chow Mein)

For the marinade:
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons oil
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt

For the rest of the dish:
2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into thin strips
1 small bunch of choy sum or baby bok choy (about 2-3 cups—more if you like veggies), washed thoroughly
4 bundles of dried Hong Kong style egg noodles or 10 oz. fresh HK Style noodles
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
Pinch of sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
Fresh ground white pepper
1 cup hot chicken stock
2 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons water
3 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine
2 cloves garlic, chopped

In a bowl, combine the marinade ingredients with your sliced chicken and set aside. Use your hands to tear the green vegetables lengthwise into manageable pieces and set aside.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the fresh or dried noodles. For fresh noodles, boil for 30 seconds to a minute. For dried, it’ll take a little longer. Cook until they’re just softened. Be careful not to overcook them, or they’ll be soggy!
Rinse with cold water, drain, and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine the oyster sauce, soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar, salt, white pepper, and hot chicken stock.

In another bowl, mix the 2 tablespoons of cornstarch and 2 tablespoons water into a slurry and set aside.

To go over what you’ve prepared so far: the marinated chicken, the washed and trimmed veggies, the cooked noodles, the sauce mix, and the cornstarch slurry. I know it seems like a lot of prep, but the dish really does come together quickly!

Heat your wok over high heat and add 2 tablespoons oil, making sure to swirl it around to coat the sides. Spread out your noodles in an even layer and fry for about 3 minutes, or until golden and crisp. Flip the noodles over and fry the other side (you can add a bit more oil if necessary). If preheated properly, the noodles should not stick to the wok. With practice, you’ll be able to flip all the noodles in one shot! If you’re not feeling lucky, then just flip it in small sections. When the noodles are golden on both sides, transfer the noodles to a large round plate.

Next, heat the wok until just smoking and add another tablespoon of oil. Sear the chicken breast. Once browned, add the garlic and then the shaoxing wine to deglaze the pan. Pour in your sauce.

Stir up your slurry mixture again, since the cornstarch probably settled to the bottom of the bowl. Once the liquid is boiling, add about 2/3 of the cornstarch and stir the mixture to thicken. Add more slurry until the sauce thickens enough to coat a spoon. How thick you like your sauce it is also about personal preference. Allow to bubble up for another 30 seconds or so.

Pour the entire mixture over the noodles and serve immediately. Serve with hot chili oil or Sriracha on the side if you like!

Hot Pot Sauce Noodles

Sesame paste
Peanut butter
Soy sauce
Sacha sauce (chinese barbecue sauce)
Chinese vinegar
Chili oil
Raw garlic
Chopped scallions
Chopped cilantro
A handful of leafy greens, like bok choy, choy sum, spinach, or chinese broccoli
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 serving of noodles (dried or fresh)
Instructions

Start by mixing up your sauce in a serving bowl. You can use any combination of sesame paste, soy sauce, sacha sauce, chinese vinegar, chili oil, garlic, scallions, cilantro, or any other ingredients you like. The ones I’ve listed here are only a suggested guideline, but if you have a favorite chili sauce or other condiment that you’d like to add, feel free!

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add about 2 tablespoons oil to the pot, and blanch your leafy greens for 30 seconds to a minute, depending on how tender they are.

Remove the veggies from the water and transfer to your bowl. Then boil the noodles according to the package instructions and add to the bowl. Toss everything together, and enjoy

Beef Chow Fun (Beef and Noodles)

The beef & marinade:
8 oz. flank steak (sliced into 1/8 thick pieces)
1/4+teaspoon baking soda (optional)
1 teaspoon corn starch
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon oil
For the rest of the dish:
12 oz. fresh flat rice noodles
3 tablespoons oil
4 scallions, split in half vertically and cut into 3-inch pieces
3 thin slices ginger
2 tablespoons shaoxing wine
½ teaspoon sesame oil
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons regular soy sauce
Pinch of sugar
salt and white pepper, to taste
4 to 6 ounces fresh mung bean sprouts

Combine the beef and marinade ingredients and let it marinate for about an hour. The little bit of baking soda tenderizes the meat.The longer you marinate the beef, the more tender it gets. This is totally optional.

A useful tip for slicing the beef is to freeze it until it gets firm but not solid which makes slicing the beef much easier!
Some rice noodles come as large sheets, while others are already cut. If you have the sheets, slice the rice noodles so they’re about ½-3/4 of an inch thick.

Heat your wok over high heat until smoking, and add 1½ tablespoons oil to coat the wok. Add the beef and sear until browned. As long as your wok is hot enough, the meat shouldn’t stick. Set aside. Add a little more oil to the wok. Then add the ginger first to infuse the oil with its rich flavor for about 15 seconds. Add the scallions.

Spread the noodles evenly in the wok and stir-fry the whole mix on high until it is mixed evenly, about 15 seconds. Add the shaoxing wine around the rim of the wok.

Next, add the sesame oil, soy sauces, pinch of sugar, and a bit of salt and pepper to taste (taste the noodles before adding salt) along with the beef. Stir fry, making sure your spatula scrapes the bottom of the wok and you lift the ho fun in an upward motion to mix well and coat them evenly with the soy sauce.

If the noodles were cold and refrigerated when you started, you may have to toss the noodles longer to heat them through properly. If the noodles are fresh, then less time will be required. Your heat should remain as high as possible at all times. Add the bean sprouts and stir-fry until the bean sprouts are just tender. Serve!

Pad See Ew (Thai Beef and Noodles)

For the steak & marinade, you’ll need:

8 ounces flank steak, sliced into ?-inch thick slices
1 teaspoon Thai black soy sauce (Thai soy sauce is saltier than Chinese brands)
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch or tapioca starch
For the rest of the dish, you’ll need:

1 tablespoon oyster sauce
½ teaspoon sugar
2 teaspoons Thai soy sauce or regular soy sauce
1 tablespoon Thai black soy sauce
1 teaspoon fish sauce
Freshly ground white pepper, to taste
1 pound fresh wide rice noodles (you can also use dried rice noodles)
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 cloves garlic, sliced thinly
3 cups of Chinese broccoli, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 large eggs, slightly beaten

To the flank steak, add the Thai black soy sauce, vegetable oil, and cornstarch, and mix until the beef is completely coated. Set aside.

For the rest of the dish, combine the oyster sauce, sugar, Thai soy sauce, Thai black soy sauce, fish sauce, and white pepper in a small bowl. Stir to mix well.

Make sure your fresh rice noodles are at room temperature. If the noodles are really cold and stiff from refrigeration, rinse them quickly under hot tap water when you are ready to stir-fry the dish. This extra step will help you avoid a big homogenous lump of noodles during stir-frying. Be sure to shake off any excess water after rinsing and use them immediately.

The fresh wide rice noodles really set this dish apart from other noodle dishes, so try your best to find them. Or you can use our recipe for homemade rice noodles to make them at home.

If either of these options don’t work, then use dried rice noodles. If using a dried rice noodle, follow the directions on the package and make sure you undercook the noodles slightly (al dente), since you will be cooking them again in the wok. After you drain the noodles thoroughly, toss the noodles with a tablespoon of oil. This will prevent them from sticking to the wok.

Heat your wok over high heat until it just starts to smoke, and spread 1 tablespoon of oil around the perimeter of the wok evenly to coat. Sear the beef until it is 80% cooked through, and transfer back to the marinade bowl.

Add another tablespoon of oil to the wok and stir in the garlic. Immediately add the Chinese broccoli and stir-fry for 20 seconds (stir constantly to prevent the garlic from burning).

Next, spread the noodles around the wok. Continue to work quickly–your wok should be at the highest heat setting. Spread the sauce mixture over the top of the noodles, and gently mix everything with your wok spatula using a scooping motion for about 20 seconds. Add the beef back to wok.

Push the mixture to one side to let the empty side of the wok heat for 10 seconds. Add another tablespoon of oil to the wok, and add the beaten eggs. Wait 5 seconds for them to begin to cook. Scramble the eggs for another few seconds, breaking them up into smaller pieces.

If your wok is not sizzling at this point, it probably means that your burner is not hot enough. Be patient, and the heat should “catch up.” Stir-fry the mixture just enough so the noodles heat up evenly, but don’t break into small pieces. Make sure you use your wok spatula to scrape the bottom of the wok so the noodles don’t stick.

As the wok heats up, you will notice that the food will stick to it less readily! But if you need to, you can add a little oil to make it easier to stir-fry.

Continue cooking, stirring less frequently (so the noodles get slightly caramelized, creating that restaurant-style flavor) for another 1 to 2 minutes, or until the noodles are heated through. Serve hot with Homemade Chili Oil or Chiu Chow Sauce on the side!

Char Kway Teow

8 ounces (250 grams) dried wide rice noodles or 1 pound fresh rice noodles
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons regular soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon shrimp paste
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 teaspoon sugar
3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
2 Chinese sausages (about 115 grams), sliced ? inch thick
2 cloves garlic, sliced
4 ounces (115 grams) shrimp (31 to 40 size)
4 ounces (115 grams) fish cake or fish tofu, thinly sliced
4 ounces (115 grams) garlic chives, cut into 2 ½-inch pieces
1 tablespoon shaoxing wine (optional)
1 egg, lightly beaten
6 ounces (172 grams) mung bean sprouts

Soak the dried noodles in warm water for 30 to 45 minutes. Transfer to a colander and let the excess water drain. If you have fresh rice noodles, cut them into 1½-inch wide strips, and set them aside.

Add 2 teaspoons dark soy sauce, 2 tablespoons regular soy sauce, 1 tablespoon fish sauce, 1 teaspoon shrimp paste, 1 tablespoon oyster sauce, ? teaspoon ground white pepper, and 1 teaspoon sugar in a small bowl. Mix until combined, and set aside.
Heat your wok to medium heat, and spread 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil around the perimeter of your wok. Add the sliced Chinese sausages and stir-fry for 20 seconds.

Add the 2 cloves of sliced garlic, the shrimp, and the fish tofu. Continue stir-frying for another 20 seconds.

Now, turn the wok to high heat. Spread 1 tablespoon shaoxing wine around the perimeter of the wok.

Stir-fry for another 15 seconds. Add the noodles. Gently fold them into the rest of the ingredients. Gather everything in the middle of the wok to let the sides of the wok superheat. Pour ithe sauce mixture evenly over the noodles, and spread another tablespoon of vegetable oil around the perimeter of the wok.

Next, add the garlic chives. Gently mix the noodles (to minimize breakage) while spreading them around the perimeter of the wok to get that wok hay sear from the superheated sides of the wok. Because of the hot wok and the oil, the rice noodles shouldn’t stick.

While the noodles are searing, work quickly to create a space at the bottom of the wok and add the last tablespoon of oil with the slightly beaten egg. Stir the egg around for 15 seconds to cook it and break it up. You may want to pre-cook the egg the first time if you are more of a beginner cook!
Next add the mung bean sprouts and gently mix everything together for 1 minute.

If your Char Kway Teow looks dry, sprinkle 2 tablespoons of water over the noodles while stir-frying. You can also add a bit more vegetable oil if you like. Serve your Char Kway teow with chlli garlic paste or homemade chili oil on the side.

Spicy Chinese Chicken Salad

2 tablespoons sesame paste
2 tablespoons chili oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice vinegar or lime juice
2 teaspoons sugar
3 cloves garlic, chopped
2 scallions, chopped
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
1 cooked rotisserie chicken, de-boned and shredded
8 oz. mixed salad greens
1/2 cup cilantro leaves
1/2 cup mint leaves
Instructions

In a medium bowl, stir together the sesame paste, chili oil, soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, garlic, scallions, and sesame seeds.

Add the chicken to a serving bowl, and spoon on some of the dressing.

Toss with the salad greens and herbs, and serve with any additional dressing on the side.