Spicy Chinese Chicken Salad

2 tablespoons sesame paste
2 tablespoons chili oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice vinegar or lime juice
2 teaspoons sugar
3 cloves garlic, chopped
2 scallions, chopped
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
1 cooked rotisserie chicken, de-boned and shredded
8 oz. mixed salad greens
1/2 cup cilantro leaves
1/2 cup mint leaves
Instructions

In a medium bowl, stir together the sesame paste, chili oil, soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, garlic, scallions, and sesame seeds.

Add the chicken to a serving bowl, and spoon on some of the dressing.

Toss with the salad greens and herbs, and serve with any additional dressing on the side.

Quick Thai (or Holy) Basil Chicken (Gai Pad Krapow)

3 to 4 tablespoons oil
3 Thai bird or holland chilies, de-seeded (if desired) and thinly sliced
3 shallots, thinly sliced
5 cloves garlic, sliced
1 pound ground chicken
2 teaspoons sugar or honey
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1/3 cup low sodium chicken broth or water
1 bunch holy or Thai basil leaves

In a wok over high heat, add the oil, chilies, shallots and garlic, and fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the ground chicken and stir-fry for 2 minutes, breaking up the chicken into small bits.

Add the sugar, soy sauce, and fish sauce. Stir-fry for another minute and deglaze the pan with the broth. Because your pan is over high heat, the liquid should cook off very quickly. Add the basil, and stir-fry until wilted. Serve over rice.

Chicken with Nam Prik Pao

1 1/2 pounds chicken breast, sliced into ¼-inch thick pieces
1 tablespoon cornstarch
3 tablespoons oil, divided
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 Thai bird chilies, thinly sliced (optional)
1 red bell pepper, de-seeded and thinly sliced
5 scallions, sliced at an angle into 2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons Thai Chili Sauce (Namprik Pao)
1 tablespoon fish sauce

Add the chicken to a bowl, along with the 1 tablespoon cornstarch and 1 tablespoon oil. Mix well and set aside.

Heat a wok over high heat until smoking. Add 2 tablespoons of oil, and the chicken. Stir-fry the chicken for 1-2 minutes, until well-seared.

Add the garlic, chilies (if using), bell pepper, scallions, chili sauce, and fish sauce. Stir-fry for another 2 minutes.

Serve with steamed jasmine rice.

Dry-Fried Sichuan Beef

3 tablespoons oil
12 ounces flank steak, cut into ? inch thick strips
5 slices ginger, julienned
1 heaping tablespoon spicy bean sauce
1-2 stalks celery, julienned
1 small carrot, julienned
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
¾ teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon ground Sichuan peppercorn
A pinch of chili flakes (optional)
2 scallions, julienned

Heat the wok over high heat until it starts to smoke.

Add 1 tablespoon oil, and coat the wok before adding the beef. Immediately spread the beef in a single layer. (This step will prevent the beef from sticking to your wok.)

Brown the beef until the liquid cooks off and the meat is well-seared. This step should take about 2-3 minutes.

Remove the beef from the wok, and set aside.

Turn the heat down to low, and add 2 tablespoons of oil to the wok.

Crisp the ginger, and add the spicy bean sauce. Cook for about a minute until the oil turns red, adjusting the heat as needed to avoid burning.

Next, add the celery, carrot, and cooked beef. Turn the heat up to high, and stir to mix well.

Immediately add the Shaoxing wine, sugar, light soy sauce, sesame oil, ground Sichuan peppercorn, chili flakes (optional), and the scallions.

Stir quickly for about a minute and mix everything well.

Transfer to a dish and serve with plenty of rice! You’ll need it.

Sichuan Chicken in Chili Oil (Kou Shui Ji)

3 tablespoon plain roasted peanuts, finely chopped
1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds
1 tablespoon red chili flakes or dried red chilis, seeded and chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/3 a 1/2 cup oil
3 scallions, cut into large sections
4 slices ginger
5 cloves garlic, sliced
1 star anise
1 small cinnamon stick
1 1/2 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns

For Step 2:
2 chicken leg quarters, deboned with skin still on (try asking your butcher to do this for you)
2 scallions
2 slices ginger

For Step 3:
1 tablespoon sesame paste
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
1/2 tablespoon sugar
3 cloves garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons chicken stock

Put chopped peanuts, roasted sesame seeds, red pepper flakes and salt into a medium bowl and set it aside.

Heat your oil in pan over low heat, and add the scallions, ginger, garlic, star anise, cinnamon stick, and Sichuan peppercorns. Allow these aromatics to slowly infuse into the oil, until everything is kind of browned and wrinkly and fragrant. Discard the spices and pour the hot infused oil into the peanut mixture. Give everything a stir and cover the bowl with a plate to seal everything inside. Walk away and don’t come back until everything else is ready!

Bring a medium pot of water to a boil (there should be enough water to submerge the chicken) along with the ginger and scallion. Once it’s boiling, add the chicken (once it’s added the water will probably stop boiling because of the temperature change).

Bring the water to a boil again, and after a minute, cover the pot and immediately turn off the heat. Let it sit on the stove for 20 minutes to slowly poach the chicken.

In the meantime, prepare a small ice bath for chicken. After 20 minutes, take the chicken out of the pot and plunge it in the ice bath and let the chicken cool completely. Slice the chicken and place it on your serving plate.

Mix all of the Step 3 ingredients in a bowl. Now combine the mixture you just made with the peanut mixture you made in Step

Pour as much as you want over the chicken. Use about two thirds and save the rest for a cold noodle lunch the next day (a highly recommended action!).

Sichuan Chili Oil

1 1/2 cups oil (ideally a vegetable, peanut, or grapeseed oil)
5 star anise
1 cinnamon stick, preferably cassia cinnamon
2 bay leaves
3 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns
3/4 cup Asian crushed red pepper flakes (Sichuan chili flakes are the best)
1 – 1½ teaspoons salt (to taste)

Heat the oil, star anise, cinnamon stick, bay leaves, and Sichuan peppercorns in a small saucepan over medium high heat. When the oil starts to bubble slightly, turn the heat down to medium.

Let the oil cook for 30 minutes like this. If you start to see that slight bubbling die down, periodically turn the heat back up to medium-high, then back down to medium if it gets too hot.

When the oil is done cooking, the seeds and pods should be darker in color, but not blackened (that means they burned, which results in subpar chili oil). Let the oil cool for 5 minutes. In a separate heat-proof bowl, measure out the crushed red pepper flakes and salt.

Remove the aromatics from the oil using a fine mesh strainer. Slowly pour the oil over the chili flakes, and stir well. When completely cooled, transfer to a jar, and store in the refrigerator. The oil will keep for up to 6 months when stored this way (always remember to use a clean spoon to dip into the jar!)

Another version:

4 tablespoons crushed Chinese or Korean chili flakes
2 teaspoons five spice powder
3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
1 teaspoon ground Sichuan peppercorn
(optional) 2 whole star anise
2 bay leaves
1 cup vegetable oil (or grapeseed oil)
(optional) 1 piece thinly sliced ginger

Combine chili flakes, five spice powder, sesame seeds, star anise, Sichuan peppercorns, and bay leaves in a heatproof ceramic bowl that can hold at least 2 cups liquid. Place the bowl on a heat resistant coaster.

Heat oil in a wok (or a skillet) over medium-high heat. Add ginger. When the ginger starts to wither and turns golden brown, immediately turn off the heat. The oil should reach 370 degrees F (190 C) and no higher than 400 F (200 C) if read with an instant thermometer.

Carefully pour oil or use a ladle to transfer oil into the bowl of mixed spices. The oil will bubble for a few seconds and cook the spices. While the the oil is bubbling, use a metal spoon to stir gently to mix the spices, so they’ll cook thoroughly.

When the oil cools down a bit, scoop out and discard the star anise and bay leaf.

The oil is now ready to use! Its flavor will mature if you let it rest for a day, allowing the spices to infuse into the oil.

The oil can be stored covered at room temperature for two weeks, or up to six months in the fridge in an airtight container.

One more:

First, you’ll need a ton of chilies and Sichuan peppercorns. For the former, just about any kind (and level of heat) will do; just make sure they’re roughly ground and you have a lot—at least half a pound. For the latter, you want at least 1/2 cup of the freshest you can find (many shops sell them online).

This is the most important step: Infusing the oil. In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, simmer 1 1/2 quarts canola oil with a whole head of garlic, a 3-inch nub of ginger, and a host of dried spices: star anise, coriander seeds, cinnamon sticks, black and green cardamom. You want the garlic and ginger just fizzing over low heat, making sure neither browns or burns, for at least 2 hours, until the oil is deeply fragrant.

In a large steel mixing bowl, add the ground chilies, the Sichuan peppercorns, 1 tablespoon of salt, and 2 tablespoons of soy sauce. Stir to combine.

When the infused oil is ready, turn the heat up to high, and when the ginger and garlic are furiously fizzing, pour the oil through a sieve into the dried chili mixture. And, uh, be careful!

Chefs in Sichuan say that if the oil foams up, that’s a good sign.

When it’s cooled down a bit, pour the chili oil into jars: Large if you’re keeping this for yourself, smaller if you want to give as gifts. (This stuff makes a good gift!)

While it’s pretty good right now, it will taste even better a few days from now. Plus, it’ll keep pretty much forever, especially if you put it in the fridge.

To make a sauce for boiled dumplings: a good heaping spoonful or two with a ton of black vinegar.

Ginger Scallion Hokkien Noodles

8 oz. boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into thin strips
1 teaspoon cornstarch
Vegetable oil Coupons
1 teaspoon soy sauce, plus 1½ tablespoons (divided)
6 slices ginger
8 scallions, julienned
1 red chili, sliced (optional)
1 pound (cooked) hokkien noodles or fresh lo mein noodles
2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine (can substitute another other rice wine or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce (mostly for color)

Combine the chicken with 1 teaspoon cornstarch, 1 teaspoon oil and 1 teaspoon soy sauce.

Heat a wok over high heat until smoking. Add 2 tablespoons of oil, and stir-fry the chicken until it turns opaque. Remove from the wok and set aside.

Add 2 more tablespoons of oil to the wok, and add the ginger slices. Fry for 1 minute, and add the scallions and red chili.
Add the noodles, and stir-fry, adding a sprinkling of hot water if the noodles are cold and you’re having difficulty breaking them up.
When the noodles have loosened and warmed up, add the Shaoxing wine, 1½ tablespoons light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and cooked chicken. Stir-fry until combined––about 1-2 minutes. Serve!

Black Bean Tofu

1 box firm tofu, about 15 ounces
3 tablespoons oil, divided Coupons
2 cloves of garlic, minced
2 tablespoons dried fermented black beans, rinsed
2 scallions, cut into large pieces, whites and greens separated
A few dried (or fresh) red chilies, deseeded and chopped (optional)
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
1/2 tablespoon light soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon cornstarch, dissolved in 2 tablespoons water

Cut the tofu into 1/4-inch thick squares. Pat each piece of tofu dry with a paper towel, and set aside.

Place a clean wok or cast iron skillet over high heat until it just starts to smoke. This is an important step to prevent the tofu from sticking. Turn the heat down to medium, and add 2 tablespoons of oil to coat your pan. Pan-fry the tofu on both sides until lightly golden brown. Turn off the heat, and transfer the tofu to a plate.

Over medium heat, and add 1 tablespoon of oil to your wok, along with the garlic, black beans, the white parts of the scallions, and the chopped chilies. Depending on how hot your chilies are, as well as your own tolerance for spice, you may want to use more or fewer chilies––or none at all. I used 7 dried chilies, de-seeded.

Stir and cook everything for a minute, taking care not to burn the garlic. Add in the tofu, the Shaoxing wine, light soy sauce, sesame oil, white pepper, sugar, and the green parts of the scallions.

Stir-fry gently so as to not break up the tofu. When the mixture is bubbling, stir your cornstarch mixture to ensure that the cornstarch is completely dissolved.

Then add it to the wok, stirring gently and quickly until the sauce has thickened and evenly coats the tofu. Serve immediately!

Quick Sesame Noodles (Single Serving)

4 oz. fresh wheat noodles (or 1 serving of dried noodles)
1/2 tablespoon sesame paste / tahini
1 tablespoon peanut butter
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1-2 teaspoons rice vinegar (optional to taste)
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon sugar
5 tablespoons hot water (or braised meat sauce)
A small handful of chopped scallion
Chili oil (optional)

Cook the noodles according to the package instructions.

While the noodles are cooking, make the sauce by mixing together the sesame paste, peanut butter, light soy sauce, rice vinegar (optional), vegetable oil, sugar, and water. Stir in one direction until it turns into a smooth, even paste.

Once the noodles are cooked, drain them and toss with the prepared sauce, chopped scallions, and chili oil (if desired).

Cantonese Supreme Soy Sauce Pan-Fried Noodles

1 1/2 cups bean sprouts
2 scallions
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 tablespoon shaoxing wine
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
8 ozs fresh thin Hong Kong Style Egg Noodles (like they have at Wegman’s, for pan-frying, not to be mistaken for wonton noodles)
3 tablespoons oil

Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil. Rinse the bean sprouts in cold water and drain.

Julienne the scallions.

Mix the soy sauces, sesame oil, salt, sugar, wine and white pepper into a small bowl and set aside.

Boil the noodles. Fresh noodles should be boiled for about 1 minute.

Heat the wok to high and add a tablespoon of oil to coat the wok. Spread the noodles in a thin, even layer on the wok and tilt the wok in a circular motion to distribute the oil and crisp the bottom layer of the noodles evenly. It should take about 3-5 minutes for the first side.

Flip the noodles over and add another tablespoon of oil around the perimeter of the wok and let the other side crisp up. Don’t stress if you can’t turn the noodles over in one shot, The goal here is just to get an even, light crispiness and to dry out the noodles during this cooking stage. In our pictures for this post, we used a large non-stick pan, which also works nicely.

Set aside these noodles on a plate.

Heat the wok over high heat. Add a tablespoon of oil and all of the white parts of the scallion to the pan and cook for about 15 seconds. Next, add the noodles to the wok and toss them well, breaking up the noodles so they’re not all in one big clump. Add the soy sauce mixture and toss continuously (don’t stop!) for a couple minutes using a pair of chopsticks or a set of tongs. Keep the heat on high.

After the noodles are uniformly golden brown, add the bean sprouts and toss. Add the rest of the scallions and toss the mixture again for another 1 to 2 minutes until you see the bean sprouts just starting to turn transparent. You want the sprouts to be cooked but still crunchy. Be careful not to overcook them or they will become limp and soggy. High heat is a key
requirement for this dish.

Plate and serve!

Pan-fried Noodles

1 package Hong Kong Style Pan-Fried Noodles (the kind they have at Wegman’s)
Soy sauce
Sesame oil
Lao Gan Ma spicy black bean sauce
Vegetable oil, for cooking

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Drop in the noodles and boil for one minute. Drain.

Heat a couple tablespoons of vegetable oil in a non-stick pan over medium-high heat. Take about a quarter of the noodles and spread them evenly in the pan.

Let them cook until golden brown on both sides. Slide onto a serving plate and toss with about two teaspoons of soy sauce, a teaspoon of sesame oil, and some hot sauce.

Supreme Soy Sauce

2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon vegetable or canola oil
1 teaspoon oyster sauce

Put everything in a small saucepan over medium heat.

Stir to dissolve the sugar. Once the sauce starts to boil, turn off the heat, and it’s done.

Let it cool completely before storing it in an air-tight container.

Banquet Fried Rice

3 cups cooked rice
Oil
2 eggs, beaten
handful of chopped carrot
handful of chopped onion
handful of chopped ham
1/2 cup frozen peas
salt and white pepper
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 scallion, chopped

Heat a splash of oil in your wok over medium high heat.

Scramble your eggs and set aside.

Add a bit more oil to the pan and cook your onions and carrots for about 2 minutes, or until slightly soft.

Add your ham and stir-fry for an additional 2 minutes.

Add peas and rice. Stir-fry to warm everything through.

Season with salt, white pepper, and soy sauce. Stir in scallions.

Continue to stir fry for another 3 minutes. Serve!

Egg Fried Rice

5 cups cooked rice
5 large eggs (divided)
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
3 tablespoons oil (divided)
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, finely chopped
1/2 cup frozen peas, thawed
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 scallions, chopped

Use a fork to fluff up the rice and break it apart. If you’re using freshly cooked rice, let it stand on the counter uncovered until it stops steaming before fluffing it. If you decide to refrigerate the rice overnight in advance of preparing this recipe, it will clump up; you can then use your hands to break up the cold rice clumps into individual grains.

Beat 3 eggs in one bowl. Beat the other 2 eggs in another bowl, along with 2 tablespoons water, the paprika, and the turmeric. Set these two bowls aside.

Heat a wok over medium high heat, and add 2 tablespoons oil. Add the 3 beaten eggs (without the spices), and scramble them. Remove them from the wok and set aside.

Heat wok over high heat, and add the last tablespoon oil. Add the diced onion and bell pepper. Stir-fry for 1-2 minutes.

Next, add the rice and stir-fry for 2 minutes, using a scooping motion to heat the rice uniformly. Use your wok spatula to flatten out and break up any rice clumps.

Next, pour the uncooked egg and spice mixture over the rice, and stir-fry for about 1 minute, until all of the rice grains are coated in egg.

Add the peas and stir fry continuously for another minute. Next spread the salt, sugar, and black pepper over the rice and mix. You should now see some steam coming off the rice, which means it is heated through.

If the rice looks a little dry, feel free to sprinkle in some water or chicken stock. Adding some liquid directly to any remaining clumps of rice will also help to break them up. Mix in the scrambled eggs and scallions and serve!

Supreme Soy Sauce Fried Rice

For the soy sauce mixture:
2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon vegetable or canola oil
1 teaspoon oyster sauce

For the fried rice:
3 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine
Salt, to taste
3 tablespoons oil, divided
6 cups of cooked rice, cooled
Your Soy Sauce mixture (see above)
3 scallions, finely chopped

First, make the soy sauce mixture. Put all the sauce ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir to dissolve the sugar.

Once the sauce starts to boil, turn off the heat, and it’s done. It’s ready to use for the fried rice, or you can let it cool completely before storing it in an air-tight container. To clarify, the amount of sauce here is just enough for this recipe. If you’re making more, double or triple, as needed.

To your beaten eggs, add 1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine and a pinch of salt. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in your wok over high heat. Quickly scramble the eggs, and transfer to a dish. Set aside.

Now turn the heat down to medium, and add 2 tablespoons of oil to the wok. Add the rice, stir for a couple of minutes to make sure the rice is heated through.

Now add the soy sauce mixture and the scrambled egg. Stir fry everything until combined. Pause for a taste test to see if additional salt is necessary. Lastly, toss in the chopped scallion, stir fry to combine, and serve!

Chendu-Style Sichuan Fried Rice

5 ounces Jinhua ham or any standard Asian salt cured ham
5 tablespoons oil
1 packet of suimi ya cai (2.8 oz./80g)
6 scallions, chopped
7 cups cooked jasmine rice
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
4 eggs, beaten

Place the jinhua ham in a heatproof bowl or plate. Heat up your choice of steaming device (e.g., an actual steamer pot, a wok with water and a metal rack, etc.), and steam the ham for 15 minutes.

Remove from the steamer and cool. Chop up the ham and then mince it finely.

Next, heat 5 tablespoons of oil in the the wok over high heat. Add the ham and stir fry until it’s lightly crisped at the edges. Add the suimi ya cai and stir fry for 2 minutes until fragrant. Add the scallions and stir-fry until the scallions get lightly blistered.

Add the rice to the wok and stir fry to distribute the ingredients evenly. Spread the rice out in one layer and let “fry” for 2 minutes. Add the white pepper and Shaoxing wine. Stir the rice to combine.

Spread out again and let the rice fry for another 2 minutes. Stir to combine, and spread it out and let it fry again. Next, drizzle the beaten eggs over the rice. Stir fry the rice, allowing the egg to cook and distribute throughout. Serve!

Chinese Chicken Curry

12 oz. boneless skinless chicken breast, thinly sliced
Vegetable oil
1 teaspoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons cornstarch, divided
1 medium onion, halved and sliced into small wedges
1 1/2 cups chicken stock
4 teaspoons curry powder
1 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon sugar
salt

In a medium bowl, combine the sliced chicken breast, 1 teaspoon vegetable oil, 1 teaspoon soy sauce, and 1 teaspoon cornstarch.

Heat your wok over high heat until smoking. Add a couple tablespoons of oil, and then add the chicken to the pan in one layer. Stir-fry the chicken just until it turns opaque, and remove from the wok.

Set aside.

Add another tablespoon of oil to the wok, and add the onions. Stir-fry for one minute, then stir in the chicken stock, curry powder, turmeric, sugar, and salt to taste.

Combine the remaining 1 teaspoon of cornstarch with 2 teaspoons of water and mix until the cornstarch is dissolved. Stir it into the curry and stock mixture, and simmer for 1 minute, until thickened. If the sauce isn’t thick enough, add more cornstarch slurry. If it’s too thick, add more chicken stock.

Add the cooked chicken back to the wok, and stir for another 30 seconds.

Serve with steamed rice and a big spoon.

Grilled Ribeye with Soy Butter

1 thick-cut rib-eye steak
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons melted butter
1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce

Rinse the steak under cold water and pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle on all sides with salt and pepper, to taste. Heat your grill to the max heat–that means at least three of the burners on full blast high, and keeping the lid closed for a good 5-10 minutes.

Mix the melted butter together with the soy sauce in a small bowl. When the grill is heated, put the steak on the grill, letting it brown for about 1-2 minutes. You can close the grill lid to let the heat build up and get some nice caramelization on the edges of the steak. After 1-2 minutes, turn the steak 45 degrees to get those pretty grill marks. Let cook again for 1-2 minutes. Flip the steak and repeat the above steps for the other side.

When the steak is pretty well-browned on both sides, use your tongs lift up the steak and brown the edges. Thick cut steaks need TLC on the edges too! Now for the soy-butter glaze.

Liberally brush the steak with the soy-butter mixture using a heat-proof basting brush. Flip the steak and brush the other side. You may want to wear an oven mitt for this process, as the butter may cause some fairly strong flame-ups. The glaze will make the steak perfectly caramelized and charred on the outside! Those grill marks we worked on earlier add the perfect uniformity of char and color!

Liberally glaze the steak continuously until it’s cooked to your preferred doneness–rare, medium-rare, medium, etc; this translates to grilling the steak for an additional 3-5 minutes for medium-rare, 5-7 minutes for medium, or 8-10 minutes for medium-well, though this does depend on steak thickness. A better test for doneness is to poke the steak gently with the tongs. The squishier it is, the rarer your steak will be. More firm means more well-done. Simple right?

Remove the steak from the heat and let rest for 10-15 minutes. It’s a long time, we know, but it’ll all be worth it when you cut into your steak and skip the lake of beef juice that escapes onto your cutting board!

Serve with additional soy-butter glaze on the side (you can make a fresh batch or reheat what you used to baste the steak–remember that you basted the steak once it was cooked on the outside, so it’s safe to consume post-grilling).

Grilled Skirt Steak with Chimichurri

1 bunch of parsley
1 bulb of garlic
2/3 cup neutral oil (such as canola oil, light olive oil, or grapeseed oil)
1½ teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon salt
? teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
juice of half a lime
Skirt steak (Make however much you want! You’ll have plenty of chimichurri to go with it.)

Pick the leaves off your bunch of parsley, and finely chop them. Peel all your garlic cloves and mince finely. You can use a food processor, garlic press, or an old fashioned knife and cutting board.

In a small bowl, combine the parsley, garlic, oil, red pepper flakes, salt, black pepper, and lime juice. Stir well to combine.

Fire up your grill to preheat. Season your steak with salt and pepper. When your grill is extremely hot (if you have a thermometer on your grill, it should be in the range of 500-600F), lay the steaks on the grill. Skirt steaks are very thin, so this process will be quick. Do not close the grill, and don’t walk away!

When the first side has been on the grill for about 1 minute, rotate the steaks to get some solid grill marks. After another minute, flip the steak, letting cook for 1 minute, then rotating, then letting cook for another minute or two. Once you’ve established a solid criss-cross, you can start moving around a little bit more erratically. This will ensure that you get a delicious uniform grill crust. These instructions are for medium rare, which is in our opinion the best way to enjoy your steak. If you like it more or less well done, add or subtract cooking time.

When the steak is cooked, transfer to a plate and let rest for a solid 10 minutes. Don’t cut into it before then. Serve as large steaks or slice against the grain and top with generous amounts of chimichurri.

Beef and Egg Rice Bowls

For the beef, you’ll need:
8 ounces flank steak, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon oil
1 teaspoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon cornstarch
Pinch of baking soda

For the rest of the dish, you’ll need:
1 tablespoon oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 scallions, chopped
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
2 1/2 cups chicken stock or beef stock
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
Freshly ground white pepper
Cornstarch slurry (2 tablespoons cornstarch mixed with 2 tablespoons water)
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Prepare the beef–a good tip is to slice it when it’s still slightly frozen, but soft enough to cut. This makes slicing perfectly uniform pieces quick and easy!

Toss the beef with 1 teaspoon of oil, the soy sauce, cornstarch, and baking soda, until the beef is well-coated. Set aside to marinate for 15 minutes. If you’re starting with slightly frozen beef, it should come down to room temperature. You can also do this step in advance!

Heat your wok until just smoking, and spread 1 tablespoon of oil around the perimeter. Immediately add the beef, and spread it in an even layer across the wok. Sear for 30 seconds, and give the beef a stir to ensure it cooks evenly.

Add the garlic and a small handful of the white parts of the scallion. Quickly stir-fry to combine. Next, add the Shaoxing wine, and stir for another 20 seconds.

Add the chicken stock, salt, sugar, soy sauces, oyster sauce, sesame oil, and fresh ground white pepper, and let everything come up to a low boil.

Make the cornstarch slurry, and stir it into the sauce. Let the sauce simmer and thicken until it coats a spoon. If you like your sauce thicker, add more cornstarch and water; if you like your sauce thinner, add more stock. You’re the cook, so make it the way you like it!

Next, pour the lightly beaten eggs over the mixture, and use your spatula to fold it gently into the sauce so the egg cooks in ribbons rather than in large clumps. After about 10 seconds, add in the rest of the scallions and continue folding the egg into the sauce for another 5 seconds. Serve over steamed rice!