Flatbread with Apple, Cheddar, and Arugula

Flatbread Dough: (makes four 5×14-inch flatbreads)
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp. salt
1 cup lukewarm water
1 Tbsp. dry active or instant yeast
1 Tbsp. honey
1/4 cup olive oil

Toppings: (for one 5×14-inch flatbread – increase as necessary)
1 cup grated or crumbled aged white cheddar
1/4 cup cooked diced pancetta or bacon
1/4 – 1/3 of a large apple cored and very thinly sliced (no need to peel) or pear
Handful of fresh baby arugula

In a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer, combine the flour and salt.

In a two-cup glass measure, combine warm water, yeast and honey. Let stand 5-10 minutes.

Add proofed yeast mixture and olive oil to bowl with flour and salt. Stir into a smooth dough, adding a few more tablespoons of flour, if necessary to make a smooth, moist (but not sticky) dough.

Place into a greased bowl and cover with greased plastic wrap. Let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Pre-heat oven to 400° F. with racks in upper third and lower third of oven. Prepare two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Remove risen dough to a well-floured surface. Cut dough into 4 equal portions. Roll each portion on a floured surface to 1/4-inch thickness. Your flatbread can be any size or shape. If making oblong ones, just be sure they aren’t longer than the length of your baking sheet, so it doesn’t hang over the edge. Somewhere around 5-inches wide to 14-inches long works well.

Place two flatbreads side-by-side onto each baking sheet. Let stand at room temperature for 10 – 15 minutes to rest.

Bake in pre-heated oven for 5 minutes, then switch baking sheets top to bottom and front to back.

*If you have some large bubbles, poke them several times with the point of a sharp knife. Bake another 5-7 minutes, until firm and starting to turn golden in spots.

*Don’t over-brown if you intend to re-bake flatbreads with toppings later on, to avoid over-browning when you bake the second time with toppings.

Remove flatbreads to a cooling rack to cool. (If making cheddar-apple flatbreads immediately, leave oven on and set to 400° and keep baking sheets with parchment handy to re-use)

Once flatbread have cooled a bit, top with cheddar and cooked pancetta/bacon. A little freshly ground black pepper, is nice here.

Arrange thinly sliced apples overtop.

Return to parchment-lined baking sheet and pop back in to the oven for 7-10 minutes, or until cheese is melted and golden and apples have softened. Allow to cool slightly, then top with fresh arugula. Cut into triangles for serving.

Moroccan Meatballs

1/3 cup pimento-stuffed green olives, roughly chopped
2 tablespoons grated lemon zest
1 28-ounce can whole tomatoes
4 tablespoons (½ stick) salted butter
1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
10 medium garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1/2 cup panko
1 pound 90 percent lean ground beef
1 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro, divided
2 large eggs, cracked into a small bowl

In a small bowl, stir together the olives and lemon zest; set aside.

In a blender, puree the tomatoes with their juice until smooth, about 30 seconds. Set aside.

In a 12-inch skillet over medium, melt the butter. Add the onion and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes.

Stir in the garlic, cumin, coriander, cinnamon and pepper flakes, then cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Remove from the heat. Transfer 1/2 cup of the onion mixture to a large bowl and set aside.

Return the skillet to medium and add the broth and tomatoes. Bring to a simmer, scraping up any browned bits. Cover and cook until the flavors meld, about 15 minutes, stirring once about halfway through. Remove from the heat.

While the sauce simmers, stir the panko and 1/2 cup water into the reserved onion mixture. Let stand until the panko softens, about 5 minutes, then use your hands to mash to a smooth paste.

Add the beef, 1/2 cup of cilantro, and 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly with your hands. Divide into 16 (2-tablespoon) portions, rolling them into smooth balls. Place on a plate, cover and refrigerate for 15 minutes.

Return the sauce to medium and bring to a simmer. Add the meatballs in a single layer, then spoon sauce over each. Cover, reduce to low and cook for 15 minutes. Flip each meatball, then continue to cook uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is slightly thickened and meatballs are cooked through, about 15 minutes.

Push the meatballs to the sides of the skillet. Taste and season the sauce with salt and pepper.

Gently pour the eggs into the center, cover and cook over medium-low until the egg whites are barely set and yolks are still runny, 4 to 5 minutes.

Off heat, sprinkle the olive mixture and remaining ½ cup cilantro over the tagine.

Tip: Don’t use ground beef less than 90 percent lean or the sauce will be greasy. Also, don’t overcook the eggs; the yolks should remain runny so they mix with the sauce.

Sichuan Stir-Fry Sauce (For Chicken or Beef)

Sauce:
1 1/2 tablespoons aged Pixian chili bean paste (doubanjiang)
3 tablespoons canola (or other neutral) oil
2 teaspoons Sichuan chili flakes (toasted and ground chilies)
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground red Sichuan pepper
1 teaspoon dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon Chinese light soy sauce
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

For Chicken
1 pound dark-meat chicken, cut in small, ½-inch cubes
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
1/4 pound mildly hot green chili peppers (Chinese or Korean long hot peppers or Anaheim), cut on the diagonal in 1-inch pieces
2 fat cloves of garlic, sliced

For Beef
3/4 pound steak (top sirloin, flank steak, etc.), cut in thin, slices
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
1 small white onion, cut in ½-inch slices
1 red or green bell pepper, cut in thin strips
2 fat cloves of garlic, sliced
cilantro

In a small bowl, mix the sauce: doubanjiang, oil, chili flakes, ground Sichuan pepper, dark brown sugar, soy sauce and sesame oil.

In a separate bowl, marinate the chicken or beef in Shaoxing wine.

Heat wok until very very hot, add a couple tablespoons of oil and swirl around the wok. Once heated, pour that oil out and add 2 tablespoons fresh oil. This procedure helps keep the chicken from sticking to the wok, which it really wants to do.

Add chicken or beef and let sear, undisturbed, on one side. When lightly browned, continue stir-frying until just cooked through. Remove and reserve.

Clean wok, return to heat, and add 2 tablespoons oil. Add vegetables and stir-fry over high heat until they start to brown but are still crispish.

Add garlic slices and cook briefly, then lower heat, push the veg to the sides of the wok and add the stir-fry sauce into the center. Cook it briefly, then add back the chicken, or the beef and cilantro, and mix all ingredients well.

Thai Grilled Chicken (Gai Yang)

3 1/2 pounds chicken leg-and-thigh quarters

Marinade
1/3 cup coarsely chopped cilantro stems
1/4 cup coarsely chopped garlic
1/4 teaspoon plus 1/8 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
2 teaspoons light palm sugar or light brown sugar
5 tablespoons fish sauce

1/2 to 3/4 cup Thai Sweet Chile Sauce

Trim excess fat and skin from the chicken. Put into a baking dish or bowl. Set aside.

Use a mini food processor to grind the cilantro stems, garlic, salt, pepper, and sugar to a coarse texture. Add the fish sauce and pulse to emulsify. Taste and season with salt, pepper, or sugar to create a marinade with a slightly intense savory-sweet bite.

Pour the marinade over the chicken. Use your hands to massage it into the chicken, making sure you get some between the skin and flesh too. Cover and set aside for 1 hour. Or, refrigerate for several hours, letting the chicken sit out for 45 minutes before grilling.

Preheat a gas grill to medium or prepare a charcoal fire to medium heat. Grill the chicken for 25 to 35 minutes, turning occasionally, until cooked through. Transfer to a platter. Brush on the sweet chile sauce or serve it on the side for guests to help themselves.

Thai Turmeric Grilled Chicken (Kai Yang Khamin)

1 teaspoon white peppercorns or ground white pepper
1 teaspoon coriander seeds or ground coriander
1 packed tablespoon light or dark brown sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons ground turmeric
5 large cloves garlic, roughly chopped
3 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro stems
1 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 1/3 to 1 1/2 pounds (600 to 675g) boneless chicken thighs (with or without skin)
1 lime, quartered (optional)

Grind the peppercorns and coriander seeds in a small food processor to a coarse texture. Add the sugar to grind it a little finer. Visible bits remaining are okay. Add the turmeric, garlic, cilantro, fish sauce, and oyster sauce. Process into a relatively smooth marinade.

Transfer to a bowl. Add the chicken and use your fingers to rub the marinade into the chicken, getting some under the skin if you kept it on the chicken. Cover and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours.

About 30 minutes before heating, remove the chicken from the fridge and let sit at room temperature to remove the chill.
Heat a gas grill to medium-high or light a charcoal fire, leaving one side free of coals. The grill is ready when you can hold your hand 6 inches (15 cm) over the grill for 4 to 5 seconds.

Cook the chicken for 12 to 15 minutes, turning frequently, until cooked through. Check for doneness by nicking with the tip of a knife. Transfer to a plate and serve with lime wedges.

Vietnamese Grilled Lemongrass Pork (Thit Heo Nuong Xa)

You can use this marinade with small pieces of pork and thread them on skewers and dip them in some nuoc cham dipping sauce. If there’s no lemongrass, use about 1/2 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder instead. Slicing the pork at the end is a traditional Vietnamese approach to eating meat as the pieces are easier to pick up with chopsticks. Enjoy with rice, a stir-fried or grilled vegetable and a quick soup (canh). Feel free to stuff leftovers into banh mi sandwiches and use them for bun rice noodle salad bowls.

Ingredients

1 pound boneless pork shoulder steak, about 1/2 inch thick

Marinade

1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons granulated or light brown sugar
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 tablespoon chopped shallot or yellow onion
1 stalk lemongrass, trimmed and finely chopped (3 tablespoons)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoon dark (black) soy sauce
1 1/2 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon oil

Cut the pork shoulder steak into pieces about 3 to 4 inches big. Set aside.

Put the sugar, garlic, shallot and lemongrass into an electric mini chopper and process to a fine texture. (Or, mince the garlic, shallot, and lemongrass individually, put them into a bowl, and add the sugar.) Add the pepper, soy sauce, fish sauce, and oil and process to combine well. Aim for a relatively smooth texture. The marinade will be chocolate brown. Transfer to a bowl.

Add the pork, and turn to coat well. Cover and set aside at room temperature to marinate for 1 hour. Or, refrigerate up to 24 hours, letting the meat sit out at room temperature for 45 minutes to remove some of the chill before grilling.

Preheat a grill to medium-high. Grill for 6 to 8 minutes, turning frequently, until cooked through. Nick with a knife to test. Transfer to a plate, loosely cover with foil or an inverted bowl for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Peking Meat Sauce Noodles (Zha Jiang Mian)

9 ounces dried spaghetti
5 to 6 ounces baby spinach leaves and/or radish greens
1 large handful bean sprouts
5 or 6 red radishes, thinly sliced then cut into matchsticks (1 cup total)
2 Persian cucumbers or 1/2 English or Armenian cucumber, seeded and cut into matchsticks
6 ounces (3/4 cup) ground pork or chicken thigh
Scant 1 teaspoon dry sherry or Shaoxing rice wine
3 tablespoons light (white) miso
3 tablespoons red (aka) miso
1 1/2 teaspoons hoisin (optional)
1 tablespoon regular or gluten-free soy sauce
Scant 1/4 teaspoon MSG
2 teaspoons canola or other neutral oil
1/3 cup lightly packed finely chopped green onion, white and green parts
Generous 1/2 cup water
2 cloves garlic, minced (2 teaspoons)
Chile oil, chile garlic sauce, sambal oelek, sriracha

Cook the spaghetti in a large pot of boiling water until chewy-tender. Drain, rinse, and set aside to drain well.

Put the spinach and bean sprouts in two separate bowls. Add very hot water (use a kettle to heat the water) to just cover. Let sit for 1 to 3 minutes (longer for the sprouts), until softened. Drain separately and set aside with the radishes and cucumber.

Mix the ground meat with the sherry. Combine the two kinds of miso, hoisin, soy sauce, and MSG (or other seasoning powder). Keep near the stove.

Set a deep skillet or shallow saucepan over medium heat. Add the oil. When shimmering, add the seasoned pork. Stir vigorously with a fork to break up the meat into small pieces. When well broken up, add the green onion, stirring constantly. Cook for 45 to 60 seconds longer before adding the miso mixture.

Once the miso and meat are well combined, add the water. Adjust the heat to low. Let gently cook for 2 minutes (expect no bubbling action) to combine and slightly darken. Turn off the heat, then stir in the garlic. Cool a few minutes, taste and if needed, add a tiny splash of water to thin out. Set aside. Use warm or slightly above room temperature.

To serve, you may set out the noodles, meat sauce, bean sprouts, cucumber, spinach, and radish for people to compose their own bowls. Or, divide the components up among four (4) individual pasta or noodle bowls and let people mix things up themselves. Alternatively, make one giant bowl and toss at the table and serve. Offer chile oil or sauce for people to add heat. Spoon and fork are my utensils of choice.

Thai Spicy Chicken and Holy Basil Fried Rice

1/2 lb. boneless chicken, cut into small bite-size pieces
6 cloves garlic, chopped
3-4 shallots, thinly sliced (or substitute with a small onion)
2-3 cups young Asian broccoli
2 jalapeno, serrano or fresno hot chilli peppers
4 cups cold cooked leftover rice
3-4 Tbs. peanut oil
2 tsp. black soy sauce – the semi-sweet kind (or substitute with regular soy plus sugar)
2 Tbs. fish sauce (nahm bplah), or to desired saltiness
1+ cups basil leaves and flowers
Liberal sprinkling of powdered white pepper
1 lime, cut into four wedges

Prepare the ingredients where instructed above. For the Asian broccoli, cut the stem ends at a very slanted angle into thin strips about 1 1/2 inches long and the leafy portion in segments about the same length. Keep the stemy pieces separate from the leafy pieces.

Slice the chilli peppers into half circles or short slivers; do not remove the seeds if you wish a spicier fried rice (skip if you don’t want your fried rice to be spicy).

Crumble and break up the cold leftover rice so that the grains are no longer stuck together in big chunks. (If you do not have leftover rice, cook rice earlier in the day and cool completely before frying. Freshly cooked rice makes mushy fried rice if used when it is still warm.) Set aside.

Heat a wok over high heat until hot. Swirl in the oil to coat its surface and wait a few seconds for the oil to heat.

Add the chopped garlic, followed a few seconds later with the chicken. Stir-fry half a minute, or until the chicken begins to lose its raw pink color.

Toss in the sliced shallots and chillies. Stir and follow 15 seconds later with the broccoli stems. Stir-fry another 20 seconds before adding the leaves. Toss until leaves are partially wilted, then add the rice and toss well with all the ingredients in the wok.

Continue to stir-fry until the rice is well coated with the oil and has softened and begun to brown. Sprinkle evenly with some black soy sauce, enough to lightly color the grains. Stir some more, then sprinkle with fish sauce to the desired saltiness. Stir-fry until the broccoli is cooked to your liking, preferably still crisp and a vibrant green color.

Toss in the basil and stir quickly for a few seconds to wilt and mix in with the rice. Sprinkle with white pepper. Stir well and transfer to serving plate(s).

Serve with a wedge of fresh lime for each serving. Squeeze the juice over the rice, as desired, before eating. Serves 2-3 as a one-dish meal.

Roast Duck and Pumpkin Curry

approximately 1 1/2-lb. kabocha or other winter squash
4-5 cups coconut milk (use two 19-oz cans of the Mae Ploy brand)
4-6 Tbs. red curry paste
1 1/2 to 2 Tbs. palm or coconut sugar
Fish sauce (nahm bplah) as needed to desired saltiness
2 1/2 to 3 lb. roast duck, chopped through the bone into small chunks
2-4 red hot chillies, cut into thin slivers with seeds (optional)
2 cups Thai basil leaves and flower buds
Basil sprig(s) for garnish

Cut the kabocha in half, scoop out the seeds and pith. Placing the cut ends flat on a surface for balance, peel and discard the greenish skin. Then cut into 1 to 1 1/2-inch chunks.

Do not shake the cans of coconut milk before opening. Spoon 2/3 cup of the thickest cream off the top of a can into a large pot placed over medium-high heat. Reduce cream until thick and bubbly (about 3 minutes), then add the curry paste. Stir and mush the paste into the coconut cream and fry for a few minutes until it is very aromatic and darkened in color. Then pour in the remaining milk from both cans, stirring well to dissolve the paste to make a smooth rich sauce.

Add 1 1/2 Tbs. of palm or coconut sugar, stirring well to blend into the curry sauce. Taste and add fish sauce only as necessary to salt to the desired saltiness (may not be necessary with some brands of curry paste which are already highly salted).

Add the kabocha chunks and duck pieces. Stir well into the sauce. If there is not enough curry sauce to cover most of the duck and squash pieces, add more coconut milk; or if the sauce already looks plenty rich, add 1/2 cup of water instead, as the squash and duck will thicken and enrich the sauce even more when they are cooked.

Return to a boil, then lower heat to medium, or just enough to boil the sauce gently. Cook partially covered, stirring occasionally, until the squash is tender, or cooked to your liking (15-20 minutes or more). Taste the sauce and adjust as needed with fish sauce and palm sugar to the desired salty-sweet combination. If more hotness is desired, stir in the slivered chillies.

If a lot of fat has cooked out from the duck, skim out the oil floating on top of the curry sauce. Then stir in the basil until it wilts to a bright green color. Turn off heat and spoon curry into a serving dish. Garnish top with basil sprig(s).

Thai Barbecue Chicken

1 tbsp finely chopped cilantro roots (or substitute with bottom stems)
8 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 shallots, finely chopped
2 tsp white peppercorns, freshly ground
1 tbsp coriander seeds, freshly ground
2 tsp yellow curry powder
2-3 tbsp fish sauce (nahm bplah), to taste
1-2 tsp sugar, to taste
1 large roasting chicken, cut into smaller sections (or see note below), or half a dozen leg-thigh pieces

Coconut milk for basting chicken while grilling (about 1/2 cup)
Using a heavy mortar and pestle, pound cilantro roots, garlic and shallots to a paste. Add the freshly ground white pepper, coriander and curry powder. Stir and pound to blend the dry and wet ingredients. Add the fish sauce and sugar. Stir well to dissolve the sugar.

Trim off excess fat around the edges of chicken pieces, leaving the skin on. Rub paste onto the surface of the chicken and under the skin. Marinate two hours or up to overnight.

Grill over medium-hot charcoals (preferably mesquite or other wood coals). Turn frequently to prevent charring and burning. Add about 1/2 cup coconut milk to the bowl with the remaining marinate. Stir to mix and use this coconut milk mixture to baste pieces after each turning. Grill until cooked through. Serve with Sweet and Tangy Dipping Sauce (see below).

Serves 6-8 with other dishes and rice in a shared family-style meal.

Thai Pork (or Chicken) Satay with Peanut Sauce

Satay Ingredients

1/2 lb (500 grams) pork or chicken, cut
into thin slices about 1″ wide and 3″ long
2 tsp. yellow curry powder
1 cup coconut milk
1 tbsp. soy sauce
30 bamboo sticks

Peanut Sauce Ingredients

2 tbsp. red curry paste
2 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. peanuts
1 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. tamarind juice
2 tbsp. coconut cream

Marinate pork or chicken for 30 minutes with all the satay ingredients.

To prepare the peanut sauce, heat coconut cream over medium heat and add curry paste mix well and add the remaining ingredients. Stir until thick and sauce-like.

Skewer the marinated pork or chicken onto the bamboo sticks. Grill over hot coals until cooked.

Serve with dipping sauce and cucumber salad.

Ginger Chicken (Gai Paht Khing)

1/2 cup peeled and julienned fresh ginger
2 small mild red chili peppers (fresno or serrano) or sweet red peppers, cut diagonally into 1/2 inch pieces
1 small white onion, peeled and cut into small sections
1 Tbsp minced garlic
2 spring onions, cut into 1 inch pieces (discard tops)
1/2 lb (200 grams) chicken breast, cut into 1 inch pieces
2 Tbsp cooking oil (e.g. palm, soybean, or corn)
1 Tbsp Thai Yellow Soybean Paste
1 Tbsp Golden Mountain Seasoning Sauce
1 Tbsp Thai Fish Sauce (Golden Boy brand is recommended)
2 Tbsp sugar

Wash and peel about 3-4 inches of ginger root. Julienne into thin 1 1/2 inch long pieces. Set aside.

Cut red peppers diagonally into attractive approximate half-inch pieces.

Peel and cut white onion in half and then into smaller sections lengthwise. Set aside.

Peel and mince the garlic (or simply smash the cloves with a side of a cleaver if you prefer and add whole to your stir-fry).

Cut spring onion into approx. 1 inch pieces, discarding the tops.

Wash chicken and pat dry. Cut into bite-size pieces, approx 1 1/2 inch length, 1/2 inch wide by 1/4 inch thick.

Heat wok over high heat. Add cooking oil, heat quickly (10 seconds), add garlic, stirring. Add chicken and cook until opaque and no longer pink.

Add ginger and white onion, stir-frying briefly.

Add soybean paste, Golden Mountain Seasoning Sauce, fish sauce and sugar, stir-frying to combine and cook for another 1-2 minutes until thoroughly combined. The vegetables should still be somewhat firm, not soft.

Add spring onion, red chili peppers, quickly stir to combine and transfer to a serving plate.

Serve hot for best taste.

Roasted Duck Curry

Ingredients

1 1/3 cup coconut cream, reserve 2 tablespoons (30ml) for garnish
2 1/4 cup coconut milk
6 oz (200g) roast duck, thinly sliced
1.76 oz (50g) red curry paste
3 tablespoons Thai fish sauce
1 tablespoon (20g) palm sugar
3 kaffir lime leaves: 2 torn into pieces, discarding the stem and 1 finely shredded (for garnish)
1 large eggplant, cut into 1/2 inch (1 cm) pieces
1 1/2 cup (5oz, 150g) fresh pineapple, cut into bite-sized pieces (1 inch x 1.5 inch)
6 small cherry tomatoes (4 oz, 100 grams)
10 seedless grapes (optional)
3/4 cup (1 oz, 30g) sweet basil leaves (reserve some for garnish)

Pour the coconut cream into a wok or sauce pan and simmer for 2 minutes, stirring constantly, until the coconut oil begins to separate out.

Add the curry paste, fish sauce, palm sugar and torn kaffir lime leaves. Simmer for 2 more minutes.

Add the duck and eggplant. Bring to a boil. Then add the coconut milk and simmer for 5 minutes.

Add the pineapple and cherry tomatoes and simmer for 2 minutes. Then add the grapes (if using) and sweet basil leaves. Turn off the heat and serve garnished with the remaining kaffir lime leaves, sweet basil and a few spoonfuls of thick coconut milk.

Lemongrass Chicken (Gai Tod Takrai)

2 stalks fresh lemongrass
1 lb chicken thighs, boneless and skinless is preferred; wash thoroughly and cut thighs in half)
3 cloves garlic (minced)
1/4 tsp freshly-ground black pepper
1/2 tsp ground Thai chili (prik haeng)
2 tbsp palm sugar
1 tsp sea salt
2 tbsp Thai fish sauce
4 tbsp peanut oil

Cut off the woody tops and bottoms of the lemon grass. Remove the outer 2-3 layers of the stalk and cut the tender middle section into 1 inch lengths. Bruise the lemongrass by hitting it with the back of a Chinese cleaver or pound it in a mortar and pestle.

Combine bruised lemon grass, chicken thighs, garlic, black pepper, ground Thai chili, palm sugar, salt, and fish sauce in a bowl. Mix thoroughly and refrigerate for 1-2 hours.
Heat a wok over medium-high heat and add the peanut oil, swirling to coat the entire surface. Heat the oil for 1 minute and add the marinated chicken mixture. Stir-fry for 15 minutes (the chicken and sauce will thicken and become caramelized). Remove from heat and serve with cold cucumber slices, lettuce, and jasmine rice or sticky rice.

Thai Satay (Chicken, Beef, or Pork)

1 1/2 lb. boneless chicken breast, beef, or pork
1 tsp. whole coriander seeds
1 tsp. whole cumin seeds
1 tsp. ground turmeric
3-4 shallots, peeled and sliced thin crosswise
1 stalk fresh lemon grass, sliced thin crosswise
1/4 inch piece of fresh galangal
1 clove garlic, peeled and smashed
1/2 tsp. sea salt
2 tsp. sugar
20 bamboo skewers
2 Tbsp. cooking oil, canola or peanut

Slice meat into long thin slices, approximately 1/4″ thick and 2″ in length. Pat dry with paper towels.

Dry roast coriander seeds for a minute or two in a wok over medium heat to roast lightly, stirring often.

Grind the coriander seeds in a mortar and pestle or electric coffee grinder (reserved for spices).

Combine all the spices with the shallot, lemon grass, galangal and garlic together in a bowl.

Add meat to the marinade and mix well to cover meat. Allow to marinate for at least an hour or up to overnight.

Before cooking, soak bamboo skewers in water for at least 10 minutes, so that they will not burn.

Skewer 2 to 3 pieces of meat onto each stick. Grill over a hot fire until cooked through. Baste with cooking oil after turning.

Serve with rice and a cucumber salad.

Chicken (or Pork) with Holy Basil (Pad Ga Prao)

1 lb boneless chicken thighs, coarsely chopped, or cut into small bite-size pieces (or an equivalent amount of chopped pork)
4-6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2-3 shallots, thinly sliced (or substitute with 1/2 cup sliced onion)
2-3 tbsp peanut oil for stir-frying
2 tsp black soy sauce (the semi-sweet kind, siew dohm)
1-2 tbsp Thai fish sauce (nam bplah), to taste
1 cup fresh Thai holy basil (bai gka-prow)
2 small kaffir lime leaves (bai ma-gkrood), very finely slivered (optional)
5-10 Thai chillies (prik kee noo), chopped and pounded with a mortar and pestle; or 2-3 fresh jalapeno or fresno peppers, cut into large slivers
Dash of ground white pepper

Prepare the ingredients as indicated. Leave the fresh basil leaves whole; the flowers may also be used. The dried holy basil will soften when soaked in tap water for 10-15 minutes. Pull off and discard the hard stems. Drain.

Heat a wok until the surface is smoking hot. Swirl in the oil to coat the wok surface. Wait a few seconds for the oil to heat, then stir in the garlic, followed a few seconds later with shallots. Stir another few seconds before adding the chicken. Stir-fry a minute or two, or until most of the chicken has started to change color on the outside and is no longer pink.

Toss in the chillies, slivered kaffir lime leaves and reconstituted dried holy basil (if using). Sprinkle black soy sauce over the mixture and stir-fry another 15-20 seconds. Then add fresh basil leaves and fish sauce to taste. Stir and mix well. Stir-fry another half a minute, or until the basil is wilted and the chicken is cooked through. Sprinkle with white pepper. Stir and transfer to a serving dish, or spoon directly over individual plates of plain steamed rice.

Chicken and Rice Noodle Soup (Kway Teow Tom Kha Gai)

2 oz (60 grams) chicken
1 handful thin rice noodles (*soaked)
3/4 cup (170 ml) water
(1/2 cup) 100 ml coconut milk
4-5 pieces galangal (sliced)
1/2 stalk lemongrass (sliced)
2 kaffir lime leaves
1 Thai shallot (press gently)
2 small green chillies (press gently)
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 teaspoon crispy fried garlic

Put the coconut milk in a pan and bring to the boil then add the chicken and mix them well. Stir until it is half cooked then add the water and fish sauce, sugar and lime juice then mix them well.

Add all the herbs and wait until it boils and then pour over the noodles. Garnish with crispy fried garlic and serve.
Serves 1.

*Note: Before cooking, soak the rice noodles in cold water for 20-25 minutes until they become soft, then drain. In a pot, bring 1 liter of water to the boil. Dunk the noodles for 2-3 seconds in the boiling water; set aside in a bowl.

Drunken Noodles (Kway Teow Pad Kee Mao)

3-4 Tablespoons cooking oil (palm, soybean or corn but not olive oil)
1 pkg (13.2 oz) Thai rice noodles
1 pkg (1.76oz) Holy Basil Seasoning, Lobo brand or 3 1/2 Tablespoon Por Kwan brand (optional)
1 lb kale, Chinese broccoli or green cabbage (2-3 cups), cut into bite size pieces
4 oz cherry tomatoes
6 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
4 oz Thai chilies peppers, crushed
7oz (200 grams) chicken or pork, sliced into thin pieces
2 Tablespoons Thai fish sauce (Golden Boy brand is recommended)
2 1/2 Tablespoons Oyster Sauce (Thai Mae Krua brand is recommended)
2-3 teaspoons Thai Sweet Black Soy Sauce
1 teaspoon white sugar, to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/2 cup sweet basil leaves or holy basil if available (leaves and flowers), optional
2 Anaheim chilies or 1 green bell pepper, cut into strips, optional (for added texture and color)
Lime wedges to serve

Soak the dried rice noodles in cool or lukewarm tap water for 40 minutes to one hour or until the noodles are limp but still firm to touch.
Heat oil in wok until almost smoking. Add the garlic and Thai chilli peppers and stir-fry quickly until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add chicken or pork and stir-fry until no longer pink.
Add ready-made Holy Basil Seasoning, fish sauce, oyster sauce, black sweet soy sauce, sugar and ground white pepper. Stir to mix. Add pre-soaked noodles, fresh basil if using, tomatoes and bell or Anaheim chili peppers (if desired). Garnish with fresh basil leaves, lime wedges and serve immediately, hot!

Pad See Ew with Pork

14oz dried rice noodles, soaked in water for 40 minutes
1/2 lb (1 cup) pork, thinly sliced
approximately 6 tblsp cooking oil
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 cup Chinese broccoli (or broccoli, cauliflower, carrots or mushrooms), cut into 1″ pieces
2 eggs, beaten

Sauce:
3 tbsp oyster sauce
1 tsp black soy sauce
2 tbsp light soy sauce
2 tsp sugar
1/8 tsp ground black pepper

Combine all the sauce ingredients and add the sliced pork. Marinate the meat in the sauces at room temperature while preparing the other ingredients.

Heat 1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil in a wok over high heat, add one of the cloves of smashed garlic, stir briefly (about 30 seconds), then add the cut vegetables and cook stirring constantly until partially cooked, but still firm. Remove from the wok.

Heat 4 tblsp cooking oil in a wok over medium heat until hot. Add the remainder of the garlic cloves, stir briefly. Then add the noodles and stir fry another 2-3 minutes until brown and soft, remove from the wok to a plate.

Add 1 tblsp oil to the wok, when hot add the marinated pork and eggs, stirring to cook through and combine. Then add the vegetables and stir fry to combine. Then add the noodles and stir fry to combine and if possible char the noodles until a little crispy on the edge (this may require more oil then you like!).

Serve hot with small condiment bowls of ground dried red chilis, sliced green chilies in white vinegar and white sugar.
Note: This recipe is adapted from A Passion for Thai Cooking available in our Thai cookbook section. We have broken down the cooking of the ingredients for adaptation to a Western home stove. In Thailand this dish is best cooked in the outdoor marketplaces over blazingly high heat all at once in a big wok.

Thai Yellow Curry with Cucumber Salad (Gaeng Karee Gai)

Ingredients

300g (11/2 cups, 10oz) chicken breast – thinly sliced
250mls (1 cup, 8 fl. oz.) thick coconut milk (coconut cream)
250mls (1 cup, 8 fl. oz.) thin coconut milk
1 teaspoon yellow curry powder
100g (4 tablespoons) yellow curry paste
2 medium potatoes – peeled and cut into small cubes and boiled in water for 5 minutes (or other vegetables such as sweet potato, taro root or pumpkin)
40g (2 tablespoons) palm sugar
45mls (3 tablespoons) soy sauce
Cucumber Salad Ingredients

90mls (6 tablespoons) sugar syrup
30mls (2 tablespoons) white vinegar
4 tablespoons cucumber, thinly sliced
20g (11/2 tablespoons) ground, roasted peanuts
1 shallot – thinly sliced
1 tablespoon fresh coriander leaves – chopped
A few slices of big, red chilli
Preparation

Put the thick coconut milk into a wok and fry for 3-5 minutes stirring continuously, until the coconut oil begins to separate out. Then add the yellow curry paste and the yellow curry powder and fry for 1-2 minutes.

Once the paste is cooked, add the chicken and potato and cook until the outside of the chicken turns white. Then add the thin coconut milk and bring to the boil. Add the palm sugar along the side of the wok until it melts and then add the soy sauce. Simmer for about 5 minutes until the chicken and potato are cooked.

Mix the ingredients for the sauce together and serve with the yellow curry.